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  • 1.
    Bergkvist, Karin
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Larsen, Joacim
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Mattsson, Jonas
    Fossum, Bjöörn
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Being me and being us in an uncertain time: Family members' experiences during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation when care is given in the patient's home or in hospitalManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Holmberg, Katarina
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Bergkvist, Karin
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Lundh Hagelin, Carina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    ESAS as a teaching tool for self-care in allogeneic stem cell transplantation2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3. Kisch, A
    et al.
    Bergkvist, Karin
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Alvariza, A
    Winterling, J
    Family caregivers' preparedness before allogeneic stem cell transplantation2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Bergkvist, Karin
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Larsen, Joacim
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Mattsson, Jonas
    Fossum, Bjöörn
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Family members' experiences of different caring organizations during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells transplantation - a qualitative study2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Bergkvist, Karin
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Larsen, J
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Mattsson, J
    Fossum, Bjöörn
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Family members' life situation and experiences of different caring organisations during allogeneic haematopoietic stem cells transplantation:: A qualitative study2018In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 27, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe family members' life situation and experiences of care in two different care settings, the patient's home or in hospital during the acute post-transplantation phase after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 14 family members (seven women and seven men). An inductive qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data. The majority of the family members' (n = 10) had experiences from home care. The findings show the family members' voice of the uncertainty in different ways, related with the unknown prognosis of the HSCT, presented as Being me being us in an uncertain time. The data are classified into; To meet a caring organisation, To be in different care settings, To be a family member and To have a caring relationship. Positive experiences such as freedom and security from home care were identified. The competence and support from the healthcare professionals was profound. Different strategies such as adjusting, having hope and live in the present used to balance to live in an uncertain time. The healthcare professionals need to identify psychosocial problems, and integrate the psychosocial support for the family to alleviate or decrease anxiety during HSCT, regardless of the care setting.

  • 6.
    Bergkvist, Karin
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Winterling, Jeanette
    Johansson, Eva
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Svahn, Britt-Marie
    Remberger, Mats
    Mattsson, Jonas
    Larsen, Joacim
    General health, symptom occurrence, and self-efficacy in adult survivors after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a cross-sectional comparison between hospital care and home care2015In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 1273-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Earlier studies have shown that home care during the neutropenic phase after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is medically safe, with positive outcomes. However, there have been few results on long-term outcomes after home care. The aims of this study were to compare general health, symptom occurrence, and self-efficacy in adult survivors who received either home care or hospital care during the early neutropenic phase after allo-HSCT and to investigate whether demographic or medical variables were associated with general health or symptom occurrence in this patient population.

    METHODS: In a cross-sectional survey, 117 patients (hospital care: n = 78; home care: n = 39) rated their general health (SF-36), symptom occurrence (SFID-SCT, HADS), and self-efficacy (GSE) at a median of 5 (1-11) years post-HSCT.

    RESULTS: No differences were found regarding general health, symptom occurrence, or self-efficacy between groups. The majority of patients in both hospital care (77 %) and home care (78 %) rated their general health as "good" with a median of 14 (0-36) current symptoms. Symptoms of fatigue and sexual problems were among the most common. Poor general health was associated with acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), low self-efficacy, and cord blood stem cells. A high symptom occurrence was associated with female gender, acute GVHD, and low self-efficacy.

    CONCLUSIONS: No long-term differences in general health and symptom occurrence were observed between home care and hospital care. Thus, home care is an alternative treatment method for patients who for various reasons prefer this treatment option. We therefore encourage other centers to offer home care to patients.

  • 7.
    Bergkvist, Karin
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Hospital care or home care after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation - patients' experiences of care and daily life during the early phase2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Bergkvist, Karin
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Larsen, Joacim
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Mattsson, Jonas
    Svahn, Britt-Marie
    Hospital care or home care after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: patients' experiences of care and support2013In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 389-395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    Treatment at home during the pancytopenic phase after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been an option for patients at our center since 1998. Earlier studies have shown that home care is safe and has medical advantages. In this study, we present patients' experiences of care and support while being treated in hospital or at home during the acute post-transplantation phase.

    METHOD:

    Patients (n = 41, 22 in hospital care and 19 in home care) answered the SAUC questionnaire at discharge (when home, or from hospital). Both statistical analysis and deductive content analysis were used.

    RESULTS:

    The patients were highly satisfied with the care and support during the acute post-transplantation phase. Patients in home care were found to be more satisfied with care in general than patients in hospital care. The importance of safety, empathy, and encouragement from healthcare staff were expressed regardless of where care was given. Patients also felt that receipt of continuous, updated information during treatment was important and they had a strong belief in HSCT but were uncertain of the future regarding recovery.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The main findings of this study were that in comparison to hospital care, home care does not appear to have a significant negative effect on patients' experiences of care and support during the acute post-transplantation phase. In addition patients in home care felt safe, seen as a person and encouragement seem to empower the patients at home. Thus, this study may encourage other transplantation centers to provide home care if the patients want it.

  • 9.
    Bergkvist, Karin
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Kommunikation: Samtal och bemötande i vården2019In: Kommunikation / [ed] Bjöörn Fossum, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2019, 3, p. 327-339Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Bergkvist, Karin
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Life situation in patients and their family members after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: aspects of health and support in different care settings2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is mainly an intensive treatment option for hematology malignancies. During the past decades, improved care and treatment have been systematically developed. One example is the possibility for patients to choose to be at home rather than in the hospital during the early neutropenic phase after HSCT. Recent studies have shown positive medical advantages with home care. The overall aim of this thesis was to describe patients and family members’ life situation after HSCT, as well their experiences from two different care setting: the patient’s home or the hospital. Data from patient-reported experiences were used in studies I and II and patient reported- outcomes in study III. In study IV data from family members experiences were used. Data from 173 (study I n=41; study II n= 15; study III n= 117) patients and 14 family members (study IV) were included in the thesis.

    In study I patients in both the hospital care group and the home care group expressed high satisfaction with the care and support during the acute post- transplantation phase.

    In study II four categories were identified from the interviews with patients To be in a safe place, To have a supportive network, My way of taking control, and My uncertain way back to normal.

    In study III, a cross-sectional survey was conducted and the majority of patients in both hospital care (77%) and home care (78%) rated their general health as ‘good’. A median of 14 symptoms were reported by patients in both hospital (0- 36) and home care (1-29). There were no significant differences regarding general health, symptom occurrence or self-efficacy between patients in hospital and those in home care.

    In study IV interviews with family members generated a main category, Being me and being us in an uncertain time was identified and five generic categories To receive the information I need, To meet a caring organization, To be in different care settings, To be a family member, and To have a caring relationship.

    In summary, numerous factors (the care routines, information, the competence and support from the health care team) related to the care were shown to influence the feeling of being safe regardless of care setting. Both patients and family members express the uncertainty associated with the HSCT. Different strategies (to have faith, being positive, hope and live in the present) were used to balancing the uncertainty. The majority of patients in both hospital care and home care rated their general health as ‘good’. A high symptom occurrence was reported in both groups in median five years post HSCT.

  • 11.
    Gellerstedt, Linda
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Moquist, Annelie
    Roos, Anette
    Bergkvist, Karin
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Gransjön Craftman, Åsa
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Newly-graduated nurses' experiences of a trainee programme regarding the introduction process and leadership in a hospital setting: a qualitative interview study2019In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 28, no 9-10, p. 1685-1694Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM AND OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to describe newly-graduated nurses' experiences of introduction processes and leadership within a hospital trainee programme.

    BACKGROUND: For many, being a newly-graduated nurse is associated with stress, influenced by the challenge of the transition to independent nurse, coupled with the loss of mentorship due to nurse turnover and rapidly changing demands.

    METHODS: A qualitative design with an inductive approach was chosen and four focus groups were convened. A total of nineteen nurses were included in the study. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. COREQ was used as EQUATOR checklist.

    FINDINGS: The analysis resulted in three themes: Need for an introduction when facing a complex reality, Striving to stand on my own, and The importance of having an accessible and multi-skilled manager. The transition is a complex, dynamic and demanding process.

    CONCLUSIONS: The orientation process from student to becoming an independent nurse is a challenging period. A flexible manager and a readily accessible leadership facilitate the newly-graduated nurse's striving to become an independent nurse. The study demonstrates that a trainee programme and support are essential in this process. There are indications that today's newly-graduated nurses have high expectations of coaching from the manager during the orientation process.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The hospital setting and its organisation are rapidly changing in relation to the increasing number of patients and their health status. In addition, there is a need for newly-graduated nurses to secure regrowth, to fill the ranks of experienced nurses leaving the field. Newly-graduated nurses increasingly perceive a gap between their training and clinical realities, thus necessitating changes in tutoring and their introduction to the work. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 12.
    Bergkvist, Karin
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Fossum, Bjöörn
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Mattsson, J
    Larsen, J
    Patients' experiences of different care settings and a new life situation after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation2018In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 27, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past 20 years, considerable healthcare resources have shifted from an inpatient to an outpatient setting. To be in an outpatient setting or at home after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) has been shown to be medically safe and beneficial to the patient. In this study we describe patients' experiences of different care settings (hospital or home) and a new life situation during the acute post-transplant phase after HSCT. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 patients (six women and nine men) 29-120 days after HSCT. An inductive qualitative content analysis was performed to analyse the data. The analysis resulted in four categories: To be in a safe place, To have a supportive network, My way of taking control, and My uncertain return to normality. The findings showed that patients undergoing HSCT felt medically safe regardless of the care setting. The importance of a supportive network (i.e. the healthcare team, family and friends) was evident for all patients. Both emotional and problem-focused strategies were used to cope with an uncertain future. Being at home had some positive advantages, including freedom, having the potential for more physical activity, and being with family members. The study highlights some key areas thought to provide more personalised care after HSCT.

  • 13.
    Bergkvist, Karin
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Fossum, Bjöörn
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Mattsson, Jonas
    Larsen, Joacim
    Patients' life situation during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation - when care is given in different care settingsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 14. Eriksson, L
    et al.
    Bergkvist, Karin
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Ljungman, P
    Wennman-Larsen, Agneta
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Winterling, J
    Sick leave after allogeneic stem cell transplantation and its association with life satisfaction2018Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 14 of 14
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