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  • 1.
    Medin, Jörgen
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Windahl, Jenny
    von Arbin, Magnus
    Tham, Kerstin
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Eating difficulties among patients 3 months after stroke in relation to the acute phase2012In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 68, no 3, p. 580-589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim.  This paper is a report of a study comparing eating difficulties among patients 3 months after stroke in relation to the acute phase. Background.  There is limited knowledge of patients with eating problems early after stroke, hence the progress of eating abilities needs to be further explored. Method.  From March 2007 to June 2008 36 stroke patients with 2-7 eating difficulties or problems with reduced alertness or swallowing in the acute phase were included. Eating difficulties were detected using a structured protocol of observation of meals. In addition, stroke severity (National Institute of Health Stroke Scale), functional status (Barthel Index), unilateral neglect (Line Bisection test and Letter Cancellation test), psychological well-being (The Well-being Questionnaire-12), nutritional status (Mini Nutritional Assessment) and oral status (Revised Oral Assessment Guide) were assessed. Results.  There were 36 participants (58% female) with a median age of 74·5 years. The proportion of eating difficulties decreased significantly from the acute phase to the 3-month follow-up in 'sitting position', 'managing food on the plate' and 'manipulating food in the mouth' and increased regarding inadequate food consumption. Improvements were shown at 3 months in stroke severity, functional status, nutritional status and neglect. Oral status and psychological well-being remained unchanged. Conclusion.  The majority of eating problems persisted 3 months after stroke despite a marked improvement in most of the physical functions. The unchanged psychological well-being and sustained problems with food consumption indicate that factors other than physical function should be taken into account regarding eating difficulties poststroke.

  • 2.
    Medin, Jörgen
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Windahl, Jenny
    von Arbin, Magnus
    Tham, Kerstin
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Eating difficulties among stroke patients in the acute state: a descriptive, cross-sectional, comparative study2011In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 20, no 17-18, p. 2563-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To examine eating difficulties among stroke patients - a comparison between women and men.

    BACKGROUND: Gender differences have been reported in studies of stroke, but the findings are inconclusive and few of these studies have specifically focused on gender differences in eating difficulties.

    DESIGN: This study was a descriptive, cross-sectional, comparative study.

    METHOD: Patients with stroke were recruited at a general hospital in Sweden. To detect eating difficulties, individual observations of the patients were made during one meal using a structured observation protocol. Assessment also included measurements of nutritional and oral status, degree of independence, stroke severity, neglect and well-being.

    RESULTS: One hundred and four patients (53·8% women) were included in the study. The proportion of stroke patients with one or more eating difficulties was 81·7%. The most common eating difficulties were 'managing food on the plate' (66·3%), 'food consumption' (54·8%) and 'sitting position' (45·2%). Women had lower 'food consumption', more severe stroke (p = 0·003), worse functional status (p = 0·001) and lower quality of life (QoL) (p=0·038) than men. More women than men were malnourished and living alone. After adjustment for functional status and motor arm, the odds ratio of having difficulties with food consumption was four times higher among women than men (1·7-9·4, confidence interval 95%).

    CONCLUSIONS: More women than men with stroke suffered from inadequate food consumption. The women had more severe strokes, experienced poorer QoL and showed lower functional status than the men. In the rehabilitation process of women with stroke, these factors should be taken into consideration.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Structured observation of meals, including assessment of food consumption, might be necessary in acute stroke care to detect patients, especially women, who might need closer supervision and nutritional intervention.

  • 3.
    Wahlström, Maria
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Rydell Karlsson, Monica
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Medin, Jörgen
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Frykman, Viveka
    Effects of yoga in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation - a randomized controlled study.2016In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 57-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Patients with atrial fibrillation often have an impaired quality of life (QoL). Practising yoga may decrease stress and have positive effects on mental and physical health. The aim of this study was to investigate whether yoga can improve QoL and decrease blood pressure and heart rate in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF).

    METHODS: In this pilot study, 80 patients diagnosed with PAF were randomized to standard treatment (control group, n=40) or standard treatment in combination with yoga (yoga group, n=40) during a 12-week period. QoL, blood pressure and heart rate were evaluated at baseline and at the end of the study (12 (+2) weeks). EuroQoL-5D (EQ-5D) Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the two dimensions in Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) were used to evaluate QoL.

    RESULTS: At baseline there was a significant difference in QoL between the groups in EQ-5D VAS- scale (p=0.02) and SF-36 mental health score (p<0.001) in which the control group had higher scores. At the end of the study, the yoga group averaged higher SF-36 mental health scores. There was a significant difference between the two groups (p=0.016), but no differences in EQ-5D VAS- scale and physiological health score was seen between the two groups. At the end of the study, the yoga group had significantly lower heart rate (p=0.024) and systolic (p=0.033) and diastolic blood pressure (p<0.001) compared to the control group.

    CONCLUSIONS: Yoga with light movements and deep breathing may lead to improved QoL, lower blood pressure and lower heart rate in patients with PAF compared to a control group. Yoga could be a complementary treatment method to standard therapy.

  • 4.
    Medin, Jörgen
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Larson, Jenny
    von Arbin, Magnus
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Tham, Kerstin
    Elderly persons' experience and management of eating situations 6 months after stroke2010In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 32, no 16, p. 1346-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To explore the experience and management of eating situations among persons affected by stroke, 6 months after stroke onset.

    METHOD: A qualitative constant comparative approach, influenced by principles of grounded theory, was used to analyse the interviews. Thirteen participants were interviewed in the home setting 6 months after the stroke.

    RESULTS: Experiences and desire to master eating situations varied, and was related to values and previous habits. Eating difficulties were experienced as disgusting, uncomfortable, strenuous, or unproblematic and not implying shame. Getting help from others could be experienced as embarrassing and undesirable. In particular, eating could be more difficult when eating in company of unfamiliar people. The participants found new ways of mastering eating situations. Some had regained former routines.

    CONCLUSIONS: Old values and habits and/or involvement of other people were the basis of mastering eating situations. New ways of mastering were found, some accepted, and got used to the new situation. Some regained former routines. This knowledge could contribute to health care personnel's awareness of each patient's individual values and previous habits during the rehabilitation process. A dialogue is needed with the person suffering from eating difficulties after stroke, to help create the best possible individual conditions for mastering eating situations.

  • 5.
    Gellerstedt, Linda
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Medin, Jörgen
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Kumlin, Maria
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Rydell Karlsson, Monica
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Nurses' experiences of hospitalised patients' sleep in Sweden: a qualitative study2015In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 23/24, p. 3664-3673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

    The aim was to describe nurses' experiences of patients' sleep at an emergency hospital and their perceptions of sleep-promoting interventions.

    BACKGROUND:

    Promotion of patients' sleep during hospital care is an important intervention for the nursing profession. To promote sleep and to initiate sleep-promoting interventions, nurses need basic knowledge about sleep and its physiology. Therefore, it is of importance to explore and expand knowledge about how nurses experience patients' sleep and how they perceive working with it while providing care.

    DESIGN:

    A qualitative descriptive design was used.

    METHODS:

    Data were collected from four focus groups and seven individual interviews. A total of twenty-two registered nurses participated. Data were analysed using a qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS:

    Nurses expressed a desire and an ambition to work in ways that promote patients' sleep during hospitalisation. Nurses reported that health care services and emergency hospitals were not organised according to patients' perspective and needs. Furthermore, they did not have opportunities to work effectively to promote sleep according to the patients' wishes. Several nurses stated that they did not have sufficient knowledge about sleep and that they did the best they could under prevailing circumstances. Nurses emphasised the importance of sleep for patients and that it was an area that should be given far greater priority.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The results indicate that nurses currently have insufficient knowledge about sleep and sleep-promoting interventions. These aspects of nursing is based on personal experience and common sense rather than being evidence based. Furthermore, sleep as a nursing topic needs to be developed and given more focus in order for nurses to be able to deliver high quality care at emergency hospitals.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

    Nurses require more knowledge and education to gain deeper understanding of sleep and to deliver evidence-based, high quality care.

  • 6.
    Gellerstedt, Linda
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Medin, Jörgen
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Kumlin, Maria
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Rydell Karlsson, Monica
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Patients' experiences of sleep in hospital: a qualitative interview study2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Gellerstedt, Linda
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Medin, Jörgen
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Rydell Karlsson, Monica
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Patient's experiences of sleep in hospital: a qualitative interview study2014In: Journal of Research in Nursing, ISSN 1744-9871, E-ISSN 1744-988X, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 176-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many patients experience sleep disturbances and a reduced quality of sleep while hospitalised. Studies have shown that a person with a disease and/or a bodily injury has an increased need for sleep. Patients' experiences of sleep should govern how sleep disturbances should be managed. It is thus necessary to focus upon and describe patients’ needs and experiences. The aim of this study was to explore and describe patients’ experiences of sleeping in hospital. This study is based on qualitative semi-structured interviews with 10 consecutively included patients. The interviews were conducted between October 2010 and March 2011 and were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Collected data were analysed by qualitative content analysis. The participants reported physical and psychological experiences that had affected their sleep. Their experiences were categorised using four themes: bedside manner, physical factors, being involved and integrity. Patients considered that experiencing some degree of control, feeling involved and preserving one’s integrity affect sleep during hospitalisation. Several factors have an impact on patients’ sleep. It is not only physical factors but also psychological factors such as bedside manner and having the opportunity to influence and be involved. The patients’ accounts provide a new perspective and open the door to changes in nursing care regarding patients’ sleep.

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  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
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  • text
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