shh.sePublikationer
Ändra sökning
Avgränsa sökresultatet
1 - 16 av 16
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Träffar per sida
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
Markera
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Andreassen, Sissel
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Randers, Ingrid
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Näslund, Erik
    Stockeld, Dag
    Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Family members' experiences, information needs and information seeking in relation to living with a patient with oesophageal cancer2005Ingår i: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 14, nr 5, s. 426-34Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A qualitative study was conducted with the aim to describe family members' experiences, information needs and information seeking in relation to living with a patient suffering from oesophageal cancer. Data were collected by means of semi-structured interviews with nine family members. A content analysis was used in order to organize data. It was found that family members were not aware of the severe diagnosis and the illness caused intrusions on the family. The time following diagnosis family members' information seeking was low. They used interpersonal as well as mass media sources to obtain knowledge about and handle the uncertainty related to the illness. Some family members did not actively seek information. In conclusion, healthcare professionals are expected to improve quality of cancer care. These improvements are unlikely to occur without an understanding of family members' needs. This study shows that the family members were unprepared of receiving a diagnosis of oesophageal cancer. They emphasized the importance of including the children in the care given. Moreover, the whole family was faced with uncertainty, which led to intrusion on everyday life. Therefore, family members used different strategies for managing the uncertainty, whereof one was searching for information. The primary source of information was the physician.

  • 2.
    Andreassen, Sissel
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Randers, Ingrid
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Näslund, Erik
    Stockeld, Dag
    Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Information needs following a diagnosis of oesophageal cancer; self-perceived information needs of patients and family members compared with the perceptions of healthcare professionals: a pilot study2007Ingår i: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 16, nr 3, s. 277-85Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This pilot study was undertaken to describe patients' and family members' information needs following a diagnosis of oesophageal cancer and healthcare professionals' (HCP) perceptions concerning patients' and family members' information needs. Another aim was to describe patients' and family members' satisfaction with information provided. Data were collected by means of a self-report questionnaire. A total of 15 patients, 16 family members and 34 HCP participated. Patients and family members consider most information to be important. The high rating for information about tests/treatment and self-care means that both patients and family members consider this to be the most important areas of information. Healthcare professionals tend to underestimate both patients' and family members' needs for information. Patients and family members were only partly satisfied with the information received, with patients in general more satisfied with information given compared with family members. Patients' and family members' needs for information following a diagnosis of oesophageal cancer are substantial and have not been adequately met by HCP. A qualitative study might be helpful to complete the description of patients' and family members' needs. If a questionnaire is employed, it ought to be less extensive.

  • 3.
    Andreassen, Sissel
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Randers, Ingrid
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Näslund, Erik
    Stockeld, Dag
    Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Patients' experiences of living with oesophageal cancer2006Ingår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 15, nr 6, s. 685-95Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The aim of this study is to describe patients' experiences of living with oesophageal cancer and how they seek information. BACKGROUND: Oesophageal cancer is a devastating disease with poor prognosis. Nursing care for individuals with oesophageal cancer requires increased knowledge of how they experience illness and how it affects them. METHOD: Data were collected by semi-structured, qualitative interviews with 13 participants. Content analysis was used to analyse data. RESULTS: Four themes were identified: (i) Experiences of becoming a patient diagnosed with oesophageal cancer is distinguished by the participants' experiences of vague symptoms, of receiving the diagnosis and of existential concerns evoked by the illness. (ii) Experiences of undergoing investigations and treatment consist of the participants' experiences of extreme tiredness in relation to investigations and treatment. (iii) Experiences of intrusions in daily life is conceptualized by the participants' experiences of how the illness influenced their daily life. (iv) Managing a life-threatening illness consists of a variety of strategies, which the participants employed to manage their life-threatening illness. CONCLUSIONS: The participants were unprepared of receiving a diagnosis of oesophageal cancer. Dysphagia, fatigue and uncertainty influenced the participants' everyday life. To manage the illness one of their strategies was seeking for information. The physicians were considered the main source of information, but family as well as friends with medical knowledge were also acknowledged as valuable sources. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Understanding patients' experiences of living with oesophageal cancer is important to improve nursing care. When caring for these patients, focus ought to be on the whole family. In nursing care, it is important to be aware of the effects of dysphagia and fatigue. Health-care professionals ought to organize meetings with fellow patients and recommend literature and websites that provide patients with high quality information.

  • 4.
    Andreassen, Sissel
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Randers, Ingrid
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Ternulf Nyhlin, Kerstin
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    A meta-analysis of qualitative studies on living with oesophageal and clinically similar forms of cancer, seen from the perspective of patients and family members2007Ingår i: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, Vol. 2, nr 2, s. 114-27Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is part of a research programme of which the aim is to generate knowledge about patients' and family members' experiences of living with oesophageal cancer from their perspective. The aim of the present study was to extend this knowledge by adding other forms of cancer: other upper gastrointestinal cancer, and head and neck cancer. These cancer forms have clinical similarities with oesophageal cancer and the survival rates are similar. This study is a qualitative meta-analysis that examines the results reported in 13 qualitative original research reports, published in peer-reviewed nursing journals between April 1998 and June 2006. We used thematic analysis. Three themes were formulated: “running into an unpredictable enemy”, “enduring a fading body” and “entering social silence”. Patients and family members gave voice to a suffering that involved the whole person. Our findings show that the whole person must be given care, and this care must include the whole family

  • 5.
    Axelsson, Lena
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Björvell, Catrin
    Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Randers, Ingrid
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Swedish Registered Nurses' incentives to use nursing diagnoses in clinical practice2006Ingår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 15, nr 8, s. 936-45Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to describe Registered Nurses' incentives to use nursing diagnoses in clinical practice. BACKGROUND: The use of nursing diagnoses is scarce in Swedish patient records. However, there are hospital wards were all nurses formulate and use nursing diagnoses in their daily work. This leads to the question of what motivates these nurses who do use nursing diagnoses in clinical practice. DESIGN: A qualitative descriptive design. METHODS: A purposeful sampling of 12 Registered Nurses was used. Qualitative interviews to collect data and a content analysis were performed. RESULTS: Five categories were identified: identification of the patient as an individual and as a whole, a working tool for facilitating nursing care, increasing awareness within nursing, support from the management and influence on the professional role. The principle findings of this study were: (i) that the Registered Nurses perceived that nursing diagnoses clarified the patient's individual needs and thereby enabled them to decide on more specific nursing interventions, (ii) that nursing diagnoses were found to facilitate communication between colleagues concerning patient care and thus promoted continuity of care and saved time and (iii) that nursing diagnoses were perceived to increase the Registered Nurses' reflective thinking leading to a continuous development of professional knowledge. CONCLUSIONS: The present findings suggest that the incentives to use nursing diagnoses originate from effects generated from performing a deeper analysis of the patient's nursing needs. Further research is needed to test and validate the usability and consequences of using nursing diagnoses in clinical practice. Motivating factors found in this study may be valuable to Registered Nurses for the use and development of nursing diagnoses in clinical care. Moreover, these factors may be of relevance in other countries that are in a similar situation as Sweden concerning application of nursing diagnoses.

  • 6.
    Axelsson, Lena
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Randers, Ingrid
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Jacobson, Stefan H
    Klang, Birgitta
    Living with haemodialysis when nearing end of life2012Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 26, nr 1, s. 45-52Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to describe and to elucidate the meanings of being severely ill living with haemodialysis when nearing end of life.

    INTRODUCTION: To have end stage renal disease and to be treated with maintenance haemodialysis implies being dependent on lifelong treatment. Several studies have reported that these patients suffer a high symptom burden and an impaired quality of life due to both disease and treatment. In the dialysis unit, where the focus is on handling technology and maintaining life, end of life care may be neglected or overlooked. Nevertheless, mortality rates show that about one-fourth of patients in haemodialysis care are in their last year of life.

    DESIGN: A qualitative interpretative design was used.

    METHODS: Serial qualitative interviews over a period of 12 months were conducted with eight patients (aged 66-87). Altogether text of 31 interviews was interpreted using a phenomenological hermeneutical method in three phases. The study is ethically approved.

    FINDINGS: The structural analysis resulted in 11 subthemes and thereafter the following three themes were formulated; being subordinate to the deteriorating body, changing outlook on life and striving for upheld dignity. The comprehensive interpretation revealed that being severely ill living with haemodialysis near the end of life means living with suffering simultaneously with reconciliation and well-being. Further, the meanings are understood as intertwined with being old.

    CONCLUSIONS: Findings contribute to an increased awareness of the complexities of these patients' life worlds and their meanings, and thus of the importance to listen to their experiences and their understandings. Findings suggest that to integrate the philosophy of palliative care in haemodialysis units may improve care for patients who are living with haemodialysis and approaching the end of their lives.

  • 7.
    Axelsson, Lena
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Randers, Ingrid
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Lundh Hagelin, Carina
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Jacobson, Stefan H
    Klang, Birgitta
    Thoughts on death and dying when living with haemodialysis approaching end of life2012Ingår i: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, nr 15-16, s. 2149-59Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe inner thoughts and feelings relating to death and dying when living with haemodialysis approaching end of life.

    BACKGROUND: Patients who undergo maintenance haemodialysis suffer a significant symptom burden and an impaired quality of life. The high mortality rate in these patients indicates that about one-fourth of them are in their last year of life, suggesting the presence of death and dying in the haemodialysis unit.

    DESIGN: A qualitative descriptive design was used. Methods.  A total of 31 qualitative interviews were conducted with eight patients (aged 66-87) over a period of 12 months. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse data.

    RESULTS: The analysis revealed 10 subthemes that were sorted into three main themes. Being aware that death may be near comprises being reminded of death and dying by the deteriorating body, by the worsening conditions and deaths of fellow patients, and by knowing haemodialysis treatment as a border to death. Adapting to approaching death comprises looking upon death as natural, preparing to face death, hoping for a quick death and repressing thoughts of death and dying. Being alone with existential thoughts comprises a wish to avoid burdening family, lack of communication with healthcare professionals and reflections on haemodialysis withdrawal as an hypothetic option.

    CONCLUSIONS: Living with haemodialysis approaching, the end of life involves significant and complex existential issues and suffering, and patients are often alone with their existential thoughts.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nurses and other healthcare professionals in haemodialysis settings need to combine technical and medical abilities with committed listening and communication skills and be open to talking about death and dying, with sensitivity to individual and changeable needs.

  • 8. Berglund, Britta
    et al.
    Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Randers, Ingrid
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Dignity not fully upheld when seeking health care: experiences expressed by individuals suffering from Ehlers-Danlos syndrome2010Ingår i: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 32, nr 1, s. 1-7Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. The principle of human dignity has assumed importance in ethics and constitutional law throughout the 20th century in the Western world. It calls for respect of each individual as unique, and of treating him or her as a subject, never as a mere object. As such, the principle constitutes an ethical cornerstone in health care. Patients suffering from Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) challenge medical care and knowledge in health-care professionals' as symptoms sometimes are vague. Individuals with this disorder have reported not being respected when seeking health care. Purpose. To describe encounters in health-care situations when individuals suffering from EDS experienced that their dignity was not fully upheld. A further aim was to describe the long-term consequences of these experiences. Method. A study-specific questionnaire was designed, where individuals with EDS described their encounters with health care from a personal perspective. Results. After qualitative content analysis, the following five categories were identified: 'Being ignored and belittled by health-care professionals,' 'Being assigned psychological and/or psychiatric explanations', 'Being treated and considered merely as an object', 'Being trespassed in one's personal sphere' and 'Being suspected of family violence'. Consequences of these encounters were 'Mistrusting the physician' and 'Risking bad health'. Conclusions. The memory of not being respected is substantial for individuals with EDS and can last for years. As a result, lack of trust for the health-care system is created and they may experience difficulties in future encounters with health care. Therefore, health-care professionals should base their actions on norms that protect human dignity and confirm each patient as a unique human being with resources and abilities to master their own life.

  • 9. Nordlund, Ewa
    et al.
    Börjesson, Astrid
    Cacciatore, Joanne
    Pappas, Carissa
    Randers, Ingrid
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    When a baby dies: motherhood, psychosocial care and negative affect2012Ingår i: British journal of midwifery, ISSN 0969-4900, E-ISSN 2052-4307, Vol. 20, nr 11, s. 780-784Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 10.
    Randers, Ingrid
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Upholding Older Adults' Innate and Inherent Dignity within a Caring Context2002Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    In the ethical ideals of autonomy and integrity reducing the level of abstraction is necessary in order to more easily be able to follow them in every day care practices. This is especially true concerning the effort of upholding older adult patients dignity. Creative intervention programs may help to increase health care professionals ethical competence. In the first study (I) 12 older adults experiences of care are described, with special reference to their integrity. In addition, four student nurses were interviewed and participant observations were performed in order to describe the health care professionals integrity- promoting or non-promoting behaviours. The findings confirmed, in relation to a theoretical model, which determined ten categories of integrity related to the self-concept the complexity of the concept, but they also indicated that in relation to older patients a further category should be included namely one relating to their social self Therefore, the purpose of the second study (II) was to deepen the understanding of the identified eleventh category, social self, and how it may effect the ethical care in older adult patients. Two themes were identified: Social exchange, which was described as the older adult informants wish to be respected for their needs of meaningful social and human contacts, but also for their needs of meaningful social activities. Social experiences included the older informants wish to be respected for their needs of talking about themselves, recalling and sharing memories, moreover, to be respected for their needs of being a part of the world outside the hospital. Thus, the findings indicate the relevance of the new identified category. In the third study (III) the aim was to achieve a deeper understanding of an older cognitively intact mans lived experiences of being a patient in a geriatric context, where the majority of the patients were cognitively impaired. An earlier qualitative interview from study I was used and analysed from a phenomenological approach that illustrated health care professionals lack of meeting and confirming individual patients needs to be met as unique individuals with personal preferences, own resources and the ability to take charge over their own life. The health care professionals care actions tended to depend upon the needs of the cognitively impaired. In the fourth study (IV) the aim was to teach ethics from an activating instructional approach and then to evaluate whether or not this was a practicable strategy to influence individual health care members attitudes as well as their ethical caring behaviour with a special focus on the patients autonomy and integrity. A 6 and 12 months follow up was performed including group-interviews and participant observations. The findings indicate that the attitudes of individual participants had actually changed into a more patient-centred perspective and that their caring behaviour agreed to their attitudes. Based on real- life care situations taken from the fields of geriatrics, where the majority of the patients were cognitively impaired the aim of the fifth study (V) was to examine the relationship between autonomy and integrity resulting from the interactions between the individual health care member and the patients. These findings indicate that the relationship was ethically complex and that they were inseparable for maintaining a patients dignity. Consequently, this meant that if the health care professionals respected the older adult patients autonomy their integrity was protected and thereby, their innate and inherent dignity.

  • 11.
    Randers, Ingrid
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Krakau, Ingvar
    Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    The activating instructional approach: a practical strategy for teaching ethical geriatric health care2004Ingår i: International Nursing Perspectives, ISSN 1592-6478, Vol. 4, nr 1, s. 21-32Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 12.
    Randers, Ingrid
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Autonomy and integrity: upholding older adult patients' dignity2004Ingår i: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 45, nr 1, s. 63-71Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this study was to deepen understanding of the relationship between autonomy and integrity in interactions between patients and individual health care workers in real-life care situations. METHOD: The data reported here are from a 6- and 12-month follow-up of the teaching of ethics to health care professionals working with older people. The data collection method used was participant observation. Health professionals' caring behaviour in everyday situations was observed from the point of view of patients' autonomy and integrity. Theoretical frameworks relating to autonomy and integrity were used to analyse the data. FINDINGS: The structural framework was useful for identifying the two concepts and their relationship in everyday situations. The data suggest that the two concepts are ethically complex. Autonomy is grounded in respect for patients' ability to choose, decide and take responsibility for their own lives. Autonomy varies within and between individuals and is dependent on context and on those involved. It stresses the intrinsic value of patients, which marks their worth independently of others. Integrity, however, is bound to patients' very existence, no matter what their physical and mental conditions, and must be respected regardless of their ability to act autonomously. CONCLUSION: The concepts of autonomy and integrity appear to presuppose one another and to be indivisible if older adult patients' dignity is to be maintained. This implies that when patients' autonomy is supported their integrity is protected and, consequently, their dignity upheld.

  • 13.
    Randers, Ingrid
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Den Aristoteliska Etiken: förståelsegrund för den enskilda sjuksköterskans moraliskt goda handlande i vården och omsorgen om den gamla människan1999Ingår i: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 19, nr 1, s. 18-23Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 14.
    Randers, Ingrid
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    The experiences of elderly people in geriatric care with special reference to integrity2000Ingår i: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 7, nr 6, s. 503-19Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to obtain an increased understanding of the experiences of elderly people in geriatric care, with special reference to integrity. Data were collected through qualitative interviews with elderly people and, in order to obtain a description of caregivers' integrity-promoting or non-promoting behaviours, participant observations and qualitative interviews with nursing students were undertaken. Earlier studies on the integrity of elderly people mainly concentrated on their personal and territorial space, so Kihlgren and Thorsén opened up the possibility of considering the concept of integrity from a broader view by recognizing its relationship to the larger framework of the self-concept. Based on this, findings in the present study indicate that elderly people's integrity relating to their corporal self were the least violated. On the other hand, their psychological, information and cultural selves were the most exposed. The study also identified a further dimension (i.e. one relating to social self), which should be included in the concept of integrity because respecting elderly people's social self reduces their feelings of loneliness, isolation and seclusion. In summary, the results indicate that the concept of integrity is complex and has several dimensions.

  • 15.
    Randers, Ingrid
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Olson, TH
    Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    The 'Social self': the 11th category of integrity - implications for enhancing geriatric care2003Ingår i: Journal of Applied Gerontology, ISSN 0733-4648, E-ISSN 1552-4523, Vol. 22, nr 2, s. 289-309Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 16.
    Randers, Ingrid
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Olson, Tina H
    Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Confirming older adult patients' views of who they are and would like to be2002Ingår i: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 9, nr 4, s. 416-31Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reveals a 91-year-old cognitively intact man's lived experiences of being cared for in a geriatric context in which the majority of the patients were cognitively impaired. A narrative patient story was analysed phenomenologically. The findings indicate that this patient's basic needs for ethical care were not met. The staff did not see him as a unique individual with his own preferences, resources and abilities to master his life. In order to survive this lack of ethical care, he played the role of an 'old cognitively impaired man', which provided him with at least the understanding and attention the cognitively impaired patients received from the staff. The findings also indicate that ethical care is independent of whether or not older cognitively intact and impaired patients stay or live in the same unit, but it is more dependent on a caregiver's ability to respect and confirm each and every patient for who he or she is and would like to be.

1 - 16 av 16
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf