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  • 1. Aguera-Torres, Hedda
    et al.
    Hillerås, Pernilla
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Winblad, Bengt
    Disability in activities of daily living among the elderly2001In: Current Opinion in Psychiatry, ISSN 0951-7367, E-ISSN 1473-6578, Vol. 14, no 4, 355-359 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Anderbro, Therese
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Amsberg, Susanne
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Adamson, U
    Bolinder, J
    Lins, P-E
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Moberg, E
    Lisspers, J
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Fear of hypoglycaemia in adults with type 1 diabetes2010In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 27, no 10, 1151-8 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims  The aim of this study was to examine the fear of hypoglycaemia and its association with demographic and disease-specific variables in a large and unselective population of adult patients with Type 1 diabetes. Methods  Questionnaires were sent by post to all patients with Type 1 diabetes who were identified in the local diabetes registries of two hospitals in Stockholm, Sweden (n = 1387). Fear of hypoglycaemia was measured using the Swedish Hypoglycaemia Fear Survey, the Worry subscale and the Aloneness subscale. Demographic variables and disease-specific factors were collected from patients' self reports and medical records. Univariate analysis and multiple stepwise linear regression analysis were used in the statistical analyses of the data. Results  Seven hundred and sixty-four (55%) patients participated in the study (mean age 43.3 years and mean HbA(1c) 7.0%, normal < 5.0%). The Hypoglycaemia Fear Survey - Worry subscale was significantly associated with frequency of severe hypoglycaemia, number of symptoms during mild hypoglycaemia, gender, hypoglycaemic symptoms during hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemic unawareness. The Hypoglycaemia Fear Survey - Aloneness subscale was significantly associated with frequency of severe hypoglycaemia, number of symptoms during mild hypoglycaemia, gender, frequency of mild hypoglycaemia, HbA(1c) , hypoglycaemic unawareness and visits to the emergency room because of severe hypoglycaemia. Fear of hypoglycaemia proved to be more prevalent in females and indicated a different pattern between genders in relation to factors associated with fear of hypoglycaemia. Conclusions  This study identifies the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia as the most important factor associated with fear of hypoglycaemia. Moreover, for the first time, we document gender differences in fear of hypoglycaemia, suggesting that females are more affected by fear of hypoglycaemia than men.

  • 3. Henoch, Ingela
    et al.
    Carlander, Ida
    Holm, Maja
    James, Inger
    Kenne Sarenmalm, Elisabeth
    Lundh Hagelin, Carina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Lind, Susanne
    Sandgren, Anna
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Palliative Care Research - A Systematic Review of foci, designs and methods of research conducted in Sweden between 2007 and 20122016In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 30, no 1, 5-25 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In 2007, a literature review was undertaken of palliative care research from Sweden during the 1970s-2006, paving the way for a follow-up study to explore the recent developments. The aim was to systematically examine palliative care research from Sweden between 2007 and 2012, with special attention to methods, designs and research foci.

    METHODS: A literature review was undertaken. The databases Academic search elite, Age line, Ahmed, Cinahl, PsychInfo, PubMed, Scopus, Soc abstracts, Web of science and Libris were reviewed for Swedish palliative care research studies published from 2007 to 2012, applying the search criteria 'palliative care OR palliative medicine OR end-of-life care OR terminal care OR hospice care OR dying OR death'.

    RESULTS: A total of 263 papers met the inclusion criteria, indicating an increased volume of research compared to the 133 articles identified in the previous review. Common study foci were symptom assessment and management, experiences of illness and care planning. Targeting non-cancer-specific populations and utilisation of population-based register studies were identified as new features. There was continued domination of cross-sectional, qualitative and mono-disciplinary studies, not including ethnic minority groups, nonverbally communicable people or children <18 years of age.

    CONCLUSIONS: The trend is that Swedish palliative care research has expanded in volume from 2007 to 2012 compared to during the 1970s to 2006, with increasing participation of non-cancer-specific populations. A domination of qualitative approaches and small, cross-sectional studies with few interventions is still characteristic. Still more strategies are needed to expand the knowledge development of palliative care to respond to demographical, epidemiological, therapeutic and healthcare structure changes.

  • 4.
    Hillerås, Pernilla K
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Aguero-Torres, Hedda
    Winblad, Bengt
    Factors influencing well-being in the elderly2001In: Current Opinion in Psychiatry, ISSN 0951-7367, E-ISSN 1473-6578, Vol. 14, no 4, 361-365 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 5. Raijmakers, Natasja
    et al.
    Galushko, Maren
    Domeisen, Franzisca
    Beccaro, Monica
    Lundh Hagelin, Carina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Lindqvist, Olav
    Popa-Velea, Ovidiu
    Romotzky, Vanessa
    Schuler, Stefanie
    Ellershaw, John
    Ostgathe, Christoph
    Quality indicators for care of cancer patients in their last days of life: literature update and experts' evaluation2012In: Journal of Palliative Medicine, ISSN 1096-6218, E-ISSN 1557-7740, Vol. 15, no 3, 308-316 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Quality indicators (QIs) are needed to monitor and to improve palliative care. Care of patients in the last days of life is a discrete phase of palliative care and therefore specific QIs are needed. This study aimed to identify and evaluate current QIs against which to measure future care of patients in the last days of life. Methods: To identify QIs for patients in the last days of life an update of the literature and national guidelines was conducted. Subsequently, an international panel of palliative care experts was asked to evaluate the identified QIs: how well they describe care and how applicable they are for care in the last days of life. Also additional QIs were asked. Results: In total, 34 QIs for care in the last days were identified in the literature and guidelines. The experts (response rate 58%) agreed with seven QIs as being good descriptors and applicable: concerning a home visit for the family following a patient's death, the presence of a dedicated family room, limited patients receiving chemotherapy, limited need for pain control, gastrointestinal symptoms, and communication from professional to patient and family. The experts also suggested 18 additional topics for QIs for the last days of life. Conclusion: Currently no definite set of QIs exist to describe quality of care of patients in their last days of life. New QIs that are focused on care for patients in their last days of life, their relatives, as well as their professional caregivers are needed

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