shh.sePublikationer
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 30 of 30
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Amsberg, Susanne
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Anderbro, Therese
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Lisspers, Jan
    Lins, Per-Eric
    Adamson, Ulf
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    A cognitive behavior therapy-based intervention among poorly controlled adult type 1 diabetes patients: a randomized controlled trial2009In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 77, no 1, 72-80 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the impact of a Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT)-based intervention on HbA(1c), self-care behaviors and psychosocial factors among poorly controlled adult type 1 diabetes patients. METHODS: Ninety-four type 1 diabetes patients were randomly assigned to either an intervention group or a control group. The intervention was based on CBT and was mainly delivered in group format, but individual sessions were also included. All subjects were provided with a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) during two 3-day periods. HbA(1c), self-care behaviors and psychosocial factors were measured up to 48 weeks. RESULTS: Significant differences were observed with respect to HbA(1c) (P<0.05), well-being (P<0.05), diabetes-related distress (P<0.01), frequency of blood glucose testing (P<0.05), avoidance of hypoglycemia (P<0.01), perceived stress (P<0.05), anxiety (P<0.05) and depression (P<0.05), all of which showed greater improvement in the intervention group compared with the control group. A significant difference (P<0.05) was registered with respect to non-severe hypoglycemia, which yielded a higher score in the intervention group. CONCLUSION: This CBT-based intervention appears to be a promising approach to diabetes self-management. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Diabetes care may benefit from applying tools commonly used in CBT. For further scientific evaluation in clinical practice, there is a need for specially educated diabetes care teams, trained in the current approach, as well as cooperation between diabetes care teams and psychologists trained in CBT.

  • 2.
    Amsberg, Susanne
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Anderbro, Therese
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Lisspers, Jan
    Lins, Per-Eric
    Adamson, Ulf
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Experience from a behavioural medicine intervention among poorly controlled adult type 1 diabetes patients2009In: Diabetes research and clinical practice, ISSN 1872-8227, Vol. 84, no 1, 76-83 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe experience from a behavioural medicine intervention among poorly controlled adult type 1 diabetes patients, in terms of feasibility, predictors and associations of improved glycaemic control. METHODS: Data were collected on 94 poorly controlled adult type 1 diabetes patients who were randomised to a study evaluating the effects of a behavioural medicine intervention. Statistics covered descriptive and comparison analysis. Backward stepwise regression models were used for predictive and agreement analyses involving socio-demographic and medical factors, as well as measures of diabetes self-efficacy (DES), diabetes locus of control (DLOC), self-care activities (SDSCA), diabetes-related distress (Swe-PAID-20), fear of hypoglycaemia (HFS), well-being (WBQ), depression (HAD) and perceived stress (PSS). RESULTS: The participation rate in the study was 41% and attrition was 24%. Of those patients actually participating in the behavioural medicine intervention, 13% withdrew. From the regression models no predictors or associations of improvement in HbA(1c) were found. CONCLUSIONS: The programme proved to be feasible in terms of design and methods. However, no clear pattern was found regarding predictors or associations of improved metabolic control as the response to the intervention. Further research in this area is called for.

  • 3.
    Amsberg, Susanne
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Lins, Per-Eric
    Adamson, Ulf
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    The psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale (Swe-PAID-20): scale development2008In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 45, no 9, 1319-28 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Considering the importance of psychological aspects in the management of diabetes, there is a need of validated measurements in this area. Such tools make it possible to screen patients for specific conditions as well as they serve as reliable measures when evaluating medical, psychological and educational interventions. OBJECTIVES: The current study was conducted to adapt the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale for use among Swedish-speaking patients with type 1 diabetes and to evaluate the psychometric properties. DESIGN: Methodological research design was used in this study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: A convenience sample of 325 type 1 diabetes patients was systematically selected from the local diabetes registry of a university hospital in Stockholm, Sweden. METHODS: Following the linguistic adaptation using the forward-backward translation method, the 20-item PAID was answered by the selected patients. Statistics covered exploratory factor analysis, Cronbach's alpha, convergent validity and content validity. RESULTS: In the factor analysis a three-factor solution was found to be reasonable with the sub-dimensions diabetes-related emotional problems (15 items), treatment-related problems (2 items) and support-related problems (3 items). Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the total score was 0.94 and varied between 0.61 and 0.94 in the three subscales. The findings also gave support for the convergent and content validity. CONCLUSIONS: The Swedish version of the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale (Swe-PAID-20) seems to be a reliable and valid outcome for measuring diabetes-related emotional distress in type 1 diabetes patients.

  • 4.
    Anderbro, Therese
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Amsberg, Susanne
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Adamson, U
    Bolinder, J
    Lins, P-E
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Moberg, E
    Lisspers, J
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Fear of hypoglycaemia in adults with type 1 diabetes2010In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 27, no 10, 1151-8 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims  The aim of this study was to examine the fear of hypoglycaemia and its association with demographic and disease-specific variables in a large and unselective population of adult patients with Type 1 diabetes. Methods  Questionnaires were sent by post to all patients with Type 1 diabetes who were identified in the local diabetes registries of two hospitals in Stockholm, Sweden (n = 1387). Fear of hypoglycaemia was measured using the Swedish Hypoglycaemia Fear Survey, the Worry subscale and the Aloneness subscale. Demographic variables and disease-specific factors were collected from patients' self reports and medical records. Univariate analysis and multiple stepwise linear regression analysis were used in the statistical analyses of the data. Results  Seven hundred and sixty-four (55%) patients participated in the study (mean age 43.3 years and mean HbA(1c) 7.0%, normal < 5.0%). The Hypoglycaemia Fear Survey - Worry subscale was significantly associated with frequency of severe hypoglycaemia, number of symptoms during mild hypoglycaemia, gender, hypoglycaemic symptoms during hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemic unawareness. The Hypoglycaemia Fear Survey - Aloneness subscale was significantly associated with frequency of severe hypoglycaemia, number of symptoms during mild hypoglycaemia, gender, frequency of mild hypoglycaemia, HbA(1c) , hypoglycaemic unawareness and visits to the emergency room because of severe hypoglycaemia. Fear of hypoglycaemia proved to be more prevalent in females and indicated a different pattern between genders in relation to factors associated with fear of hypoglycaemia. Conclusions  This study identifies the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia as the most important factor associated with fear of hypoglycaemia. Moreover, for the first time, we document gender differences in fear of hypoglycaemia, suggesting that females are more affected by fear of hypoglycaemia than men.

  • 5.
    Anderbro, Therese
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Amsberg, Susanne
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Lins, Per-Eric
    Adamson, Ulf
    Lisspers, Jan
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version of the Hypoglycaemia Fear Survey2008In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 73, no 1, 127-31 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the Hypoglycaemia Fear Survey (Swe-HFS) for use among Swedish-speaking patients with type 1 diabetes. METHODS: The HFS was translated using the forward-backward translation method and was thereafter answered by 325 type 1 patients. The psychometric properties were investigated using exploratory factor analysis, Cronbach's alpha, content and convergent validity. RESULTS: The factor analysis showed that a three-factor solution was reasonable with the subscales Behaviour/Avoidance (10 items), Worry (6 items) and Aloneness (4 items). Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the total score was 0.85. The result also supports the instrument's content validity and convergent validity. CONCLUSION: The Swedish version of the HFS appears to be a reliable and valid instrument for measuring fear of hypoglycaemia (FoH) in type 1 patients. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: The results from this study suggest that the Swe-HFS, an instrument that is brief and easy to administer, may be valuable in clinically assessing FoH among patients with type 1 diabetes.

  • 6.
    Anderbro, Therese
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Bolinder, J
    Lins, P-E
    Wredling, Regina
    Moberg, E
    Lisspers, J
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    The role of emotional and psychosocial factors in relation to fear of hypoglycemia in adults with type 1 diabetesArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Anderbro, Therese
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Bolinder, J.
    Lins, Per-Eric
    Wredling, Regina
    Moberg, E.
    Lisspers, Jan
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Pscyhosocial aspects of fear of hypoglycemia2012In: FEND 17th Annual Conference, 2012, 18- p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8. Anderbro, Therese
    et al.
    Gonder-Frederick, Linda
    Bolinder, Jan
    Lins, Per-Eric
    Wredling, Regina
    Moberg, Erik
    Lisspers, Jan
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Fear of hypoglycemia: relationship to hypoglycemic risk and psychological factors2014In: Acta Diabetologica, ISSN 0940-5429, E-ISSN 1432-5233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The major aims of this study were to examine (1) the association between fear of hypoglycemia (FOH) in adults with type 1 diabetes with demographic, psychological (anxiety and depression), and disease-specific clinical factors (hypoglycemia history and unawareness, A1c), including severe hypoglycemia (SH), and (2) differences in patient subgroups categorized by level of FOH and risk of SH.

    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Questionnaires were mailed to 764 patients with type 1 diabetes including the Swedish translation of the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey (HFS) and other psychological measures including the Perceived Stress Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Anxiety Sensitivity Index, Social Phobia Scale, and Fear of Complications Scale. A questionnaire to assess hypoglycemia history was also included and A1c measures were obtained from medical records. Statistical analyses included univariate approaches, multiple stepwise linear regressions, Chi-square t tests, and ANOVAs.

    RESULTS: Regressions showed that several clinical factors (SH history, frequency of nocturnal hypoglycemia, self-monitoring) were significantly associated with FOH but R (2) increased from 16.25 to 39.2 % when anxiety measures were added to the model. When patients were categorized by level of FOH (low, high) and SH risk (low, high), subgroups showed significant differences in non-diabetes-related anxiety, hypoglycemia history, self-monitoring, and glycemic control.

    CONCLUSION: There is a strong link between FOH and non-diabetes-related anxiety, as well as hypoglycemia history. Comparison of patient subgroups categorized according to level of FOH and SH risk demonstrated the complexity of FOH and identified important differences in psychological and clinical variables, which have implications for clinical interventions.

  • 9. Avelin, Pernilla
    et al.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Säflund, Karin
    Wredling, Regina
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Parental grief and relationships after the loss of a stillborn baby2013In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 29, no 6, 668-673 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: to describe the grief of mothers and fathers and its influence on their relationships after the loss of a stillborn baby. DESIGN: a postal questionnaire at three months, one year and two years after stillbirth. SETTING: a study of mothers and fathers of babies stillborn during a one-year period in the Stockholm region of Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: 55 parents, 33 mothers and 22 fathers. FINDINGS: mothers and fathers stated that they became closer after the loss, and that the feeling deepened over the course of the following year. The parents said that they began grieving immediately as a gradual process, both as individuals, and together as a couple. During this grieving process their expectations, expressions and personal and joint needs might have threatened their relationship as a couple, in that they individually felt alone at this time of withdrawal. While some mothers and fathers had similar grieving styles, the intensity and expression of grief varied, and the effects were profound and unique for each individual. KEY CONCLUSIONS: experiences following a loss are complex, with each partner attempting to come to terms with the loss and the resultant effect on the relationship with their partner. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: anticipating and being able to acknowledge the different aspects of grief will enable professionals to implement more effective intervention in helping couples grieve both individually and together.

  • 10. Erlandsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Säflund, Karin
    Wredling, Regina
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Support after stillbirth and its effect on parental grief over time2011In: Journal of social work in end-of-life & palliative care, ISSN 1552-4264, Vol. 7, no 2-3, 139-52 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study the authors describe parents' experiences of support over a 2-year period after a stillbirth and its effect on parental grief. Data was collected by questionnaire from 33 mothers and 22 fathers at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after a stillbirth. Midwives, physicians, counselors, and priests--at the hospital where the stillbirth occurred--are those on the front line providing professional support. The support from family and friends was seen to be important 2 years after the stillbirth. The need for professional support after stillbirth can differ, depending on the support provided by family, friends, and social networks. They may not fully realize the value of their support and how to be supportive. Printed educational materials given to individuals in the social network or family might therefore be helpful.

  • 11. Franzén-Dahlin, Åsa
    et al.
    Larson, Jenny
    Murray, Veronica
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University College.
    Billing, Ewa
    A randomized controlled trial evaluating the effect of a support and education programme for spouses of people affected by stroke2008In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, Vol. 22, no 8, 722-30 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether a nurse-led support and education programme for spouses of patients affected by stroke improved the psychological health of the spouses. DESIGN: A longitudinal, open, randomized controlled trial. SAMPLE: One hundred spouses of stroke patients were randomly assigned to either an intervention or a control group. SETTING: The study was conducted in a hospital setting. INTERVENTION: The intervention consisted of six group meetings during six months, with a follow-up after further six months. Comparison between the intervention and the control groups was made at baseline, after six and 12 months using analysis with repeated measures. MAIN MEASURES: The Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale--Self-Affective for psychological health. RESULTS: No significant difference was found between the intervention and control groups concerning overall psychological health. However, a subanalysis revealed that those who participated more frequently in the group meetings (five or six times) had significantly stronger psychological health (P<0.05). Knowledge about stroke increased over time in both groups, but participants in the intervention group learned more (P=0.041). CONCLUSION: Encouraging participation in the group meetings of a support programme might have a positive effect on psychological health.

  • 12. Franzén-Dahlin, Åsa
    et al.
    Laska, Ann-Charlotte
    Larson, Jenny
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University College.
    Billing, Ewa
    Murray, Veronica
    Predictors of life situation among significant others of depressed or aphasic stroke patients2008In: Journal of clinical nursing, ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, no 12, 1574-80 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this study was to examine predictors of the life situation of the significant other of depressed or aphasic stroke patients. BACKGROUND: Depression and aphasia are common consequences of stroke, and both may put pressure on the significant other who have to deal not only with a possible physical handicap but also with communication and/or serious psychiatric difficulties. DESIGN: Descriptive, cross-sectional study. METHODS: The participants were significant others of 71 depressed and 77 aphasic stroke patients. Depression was diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder, and degree of aphasia was diagnosed with the Amsterdam Nijmegen Everyday Language Test. Assessments of the life situation, state of depression and aggression, personality change and need of assistance were made through questionnaires issued to the significant others. RESULTS: Perceived need of assistance was the only common predictor of life situation of the significant other in both groups (p < 0.001). With respect to the aphasic patients, perceived personality change (p < 0.001) and living with the patient (p = 0.004) were factors that had a negative effect on the life situation of the significant other. CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights that the perception of the patient's need of assistance is an important factor in predicting the life situation among spouses of depressed as well as aphasic stroke patients. A comparison of the two groups to explain the life situation of the significant others revealed greater explanatory power for the aphasic group. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Assessments of the spouses' perception as well as of the patients' factual situation may identify those significant others at risk. With this new approach, necessary steps may be taken to alleviate pressure on the significant other.

  • 13.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Adamson, Ulf
    Lins, Per-Eric
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Patient management of long-term continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion2005In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 51, no 2, 112-8 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This paper reports a study of patients' current practice with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusions, particularly with respect to the management of the pump. BACKGROUND: Successful implementation of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion requires a motivated patient with a range of technical skills and self-management capabilities. The therapy should be prescribed, implemented and monitored by a skilled professional team familiar with it and capable of supporting the patient. METHODS: A questionnaire was mailed to 102 continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion treated patients at a Swedish university hospital with experience of pump treatment for at least 6 months. RESULTS: The questionnaire was answered by 88% of the patients, 53 women and 37 men, aged 22-71 years with a duration of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion use of between 7 months and 19 years. The changing interval for soft infusion set ranged from 2.0 to 10.0 days (mean 4.8) and for metal needles from 1.5 to 7.5 days (mean 3.8), P = 0.001. Catheter occlusions were significantly more often reported in patients with presence of bleeding at the infusion site (P = 0.011) and among those using insulin lispro (P = 0.032). CONCLUSIONS: Patients having long-term continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion should be carefully audited with respect to the management of the insulin pump and its accessories. In patients who frequently experience problems, shorter intervals between changes of infusion sets are strongly advocated and type of insulin preparation may be of importance in some cases.

  • 14.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Amsberg, Susanne
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Hannerz, Lena
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Adamson, Ulf
    Arnqvist, Hans J
    Lins, Per-Eric
    Impaired absorption of insulin aspart from lipohypertrophic injection sites2005In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 28, no 8, 2025-7 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Eskils, J
    Adamson, Ulf
    Elwin, C E
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Lins, Per-Eric
    A paracetamol-pasta test for assessing gastric emptying in healthy and diabetic subjects2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, Vol. 63, no 2, 159-66 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have shown that the relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms and gastric emptying is weak. Therefore the quantitative assessment of gastric emptying with a relatively simple, non-invasive test would be of considerable clinical value in insulin-treated diabetic patients to identify those with disturbed gastric emptying. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the inter- and intra-subject variability of a paracetamol-pasta test in healthy subjects and in IDDM patients. Eighteen healthy subjects (8 women) with a mean age of 37 years (range 19-68) and 19 IDDM patients (10 women) with a mean age of 48 years (range 25-62) and mean duration of diabetes of 28 years (range 6-52) were studied on two occasions with an interval of 1 to 4 weeks. After an overnight fast the subjects ingested a standardized pasta meal mixed with 2 g paracetamol in a period of 15 min. Blood samples were drawn at regular intervals after meal intake and analysed for paracetamol (P) and blood glucose. The serum levels of P were significantly lower at 15 min in diabetic patients. The intra-subject coefficients of variation (CV%) of the areas under the serum paracetamol concentration-time curve (AUC) were almost identical in healthy and diabetic subjects, while the intra-subject CV of the P-Tmax was considerably lower in diabetic patients as well as markedly lower than the corresponding inter-subject CV. The inter-subject CVs of all parameters calculated were generally higher in diabetic patients. This study indicates that the assessment of paracetamol absorption kinetics during a paracetamol-pasta test is reproducible in healthy as well as in diabetic subjects. Diabetic patients with non-optimal glucose control and without a case history indicating gastroduodenal motor function disturbances achieve lower serum concentration of P at 15 min and generally display a higher inter-individual variability indicative of subclinical disturbances of gastric emptying in this group of patients.

  • 16.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Wredling, Regina
    Diabetes hos vuxna2012In: Omvårdnad vid diabetes / [ed] Karin Wikblad, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, 2, 227-236 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Diabetes hos vuxna2006In: Omvårdnad vid diabetes / [ed] Karin Wikblad, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2006, 115-35 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Kvalitetsindikatorer för patienter med diabetes2009In: Kvalitetsindikatorer inom omvårdnad / [ed] Ewa Idvall, Stockholm: Svensk sjuksköterskeförening ; Gothia , 2009, 5, 37-44 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Wredling, Regina
    Mätning av patientens välbefinnande, behandlingstillfredsställelse och rädsla för hypoglykemi2012In: Omvårdnad vid diabetes / [ed] Karin Wikblad, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, 2, 429-433 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Mätning av patientens välbefinnande och behandlingstillfredsställelse2006In: Omvårdnad vid diabetes / [ed] Karin Wikblad, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2006, 343-47 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Adamson, Ulf
    Lins, Per-Eric
    A morning dose of insulin glargine prevents nocturnal ketosis after postprandial interruption of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion with insulin lispro2007In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, Vol. 33, no 6, 469-71 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this crossover trial was to evaluate the potential of partial substitution of basal insulin with glargine, administered once daily in the morning, to protect against nocturnal ketosis after postprandial interruption of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). METHODS: Seven patients with type 1 diabetes received 4 weeks of treatment with insulin lispro, administered by CSII, and 4 weeks of treatment with CSII and a partial basal replacement dose of insulin glargine administered in the morning. On day 28 of each treatment phase, patients were admitted to the research unit where dinner was served and their usual dinner insulin bolus dose given, after which CSII was discontinued at 7 pm. Plasma (p) beta-hydroxybutyrate and p glucose were measured every hour for 12 h thereafter. RESULTS: Plasma beta-hydroxybutyrate at 7 pm was 0.16+/-0.05 and 0.13+/-0.07 mmol/l with and without glargine, respectively, and increased to 0.17+/-0.10 and 0.60+/-0.3 mmol/l within 6 h (P=0.02). Plasma glucose increased without glargine, from 8.6+/-2.9 to 21.1+/-3.0 mmol/l (P=0.003), but did not rise significantly following glargine (13.6+/-4.7 vs. 12.6+/-5.6 mmol/l; P=0.65). CONCLUSIONS: Partial replacement with a morning dose of insulin glargine protects against the development of ketosis for as much as 12 h after postprandial interruption of CSII. This treatment strategy could, therefore, be useful for patients who are prone to ketosis but, for other reasons, are deemed suitable for CSII.

  • 22. Jäghult, S
    et al.
    Saboonchi, Fredrik
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Wredling, Regina
    Kapraali, M
    Stress as a trigger for relapses in IBD: a case-crossover studyArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 23. Jäghult, Susanna
    et al.
    Saboonchi, Fredrik
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Wredling, Regina
    Kapraali, Marjo
    Factor structures of the Swedish version of the RFIPC: investigating the validity of measurements of IBD patient's worries and concerns2010In: Gastroenterology Research, ISSN 1918-2805, Vol. 3, no 5, 191-200 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Worries and concerns of patients with IBD comprise an important negative factor in their HRQOL. The Rating Form of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patient Concerns (RFIPC) was developed to describe the nature and degree of the worries and concerns of IBD patients. In the original version, the specific issues of worries are divided into four separate factors. These factors provide useful information about HRQOL and the kind of worries and concerns which are most important to the patient. However, the Swedish version of the RFIPC is often scored using a single sum score, implying that all the specific issues of worries stem from a single general worry factor. The aim of this study was to validate the factor structure of the Swedish version of the RFIPC.Methods: A sample consisting of 195 patients with IBD filled out the RFIPC. Confirmatory factor analysis was performed to examine fit of three hypothesized models of factor structure. Spearman’s correlation and Mann-Whitney analysis were used to follow up the results.Results: The single-factor model displayed poor fit indices. The four-factor model marked substantive improvement, but still remains inadequate. The final four-factor model permitting correlated error terms between some items displayed the most adequate fit.  Conclusions: The factorial structure of the RFIPC, as suggested in the original version, was able to be replicated with a slight modification in the Swedish version. The separate factors identified in this structure provide more detailed information about the worries and concerns of IBD patients as these components of worries are different related to HRQOL and general health.

  • 24. Jäghult, Susanna
    et al.
    Saboonchi, Fredrik
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Kapraali, Marjo
    Identifying predictors of low health-related quality of life among patients with inflammatory bowel disease: comparison between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis with disease duration2011In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 20, no 11-12, 1578-1587 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim.  To identify predictors of low health-related quality of life among patients with inflammatory bowel disease and make a comparison between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis with disease duration. Background.  Studies have shown that patients with inflammatory bowel disease rate their health-related quality of life lower, as compared with a general population. Design.  Survey. Methods.  In this study, 197 patients in remission were included and divided into a Crohn's disease group and an ulcerative colitis group. Each group was also divided into separate groups whether the patients had short disease duration or long disease duration. Generic instruments, combined with disease-specific questionnaires, were used for measuring health-related quality of life. Results.  The analysis showed a non-significant effect for diagnosis, but a significant effect for disease duration showing that the patients with short disease duration had lower scores of health-related quality of life compared with patients with long disease duration. A significant interaction between diagnosis and disease duration was also revealed. Conclusion.  Patients with longer disease duration experienced a better health-related quality of life than patients with short disease duration. Patients with Crohn's disease and short disease duration have the lowest health-related quality of life and are in greatest need of education and support. Relevance to clinical practice.  It is important to identify which patients' are in the greatest need of education and support.

  • 25. Larson, Jenny
    et al.
    Franzén-Dahlin, Åsa
    Billing, Ewa
    von Arbin, Magnus
    Murray, Veronica
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University College.
    The impact of gender regarding psychological well-being and general life situation among spouses of stroke patients during the first year after the patients' stroke event: a longitudinal study2008In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, Vol. 45, no 2, 257-65 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The informal caregivers perceive lack of choice to take on the role of caregiving, receiving little or no preparation for the caregiving role at home. The typical informal caregiver is female, either a spouse or adult child of the care recipient, and seldom shares the responsibilities of caregiving with other family members. The spouses worry about the ill relative, but also about what consequences the disease might have for their own life. The worries seem to vary with gender and disease. There are, to our knowledge, few previous longitudinal studies that have focused on gender differences among spouses of stroke patients. OBJECTIVES: To explore gender differences among spouses in perceived psychological well-being and general life situation, during the first year after the patients' stroke event. DESIGN: Longitudinal study with three assessments regarding psychological well-being and general life situation during 1 year. SETTINGS: The study took place at a stroke ward, Stockholm, Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: Consecutively 80 female and 20 male spouses of stroke patients admitted to a stroke unit participated. METHODS: Data were analysed using analyses of variance. RESULTS: Female spouses have a negative impact on psychological well-being, while male spouses have a lower occurrence of emotional contacts in their social network. Consistently, the female spouses reported lower quality of life and well-being than the male spouses. CONCLUSIONS: This study generates the hypotheses that there are gender differences among spousal caregivers of stroke patients; female spouses are more negatively affected in their life situation due to the patients' stroke event than the male spouses. It is important to take the individual differences under consideration when designing a nursing intervention, to meet the different needs and demands of male and female caregivers. The interventions should focus on individual support, so that the caregivers can adapt to their new role and be comfortable and effective as informal caregivers.

  • 26.
    Medin, Jörgen
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Larson, Jenny
    von Arbin, Magnus
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Tham, Kerstin
    Elderly persons' experience and management of eating situations 6 months after stroke2010In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 32, no 16, 1346-53 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To explore the experience and management of eating situations among persons affected by stroke, 6 months after stroke onset.

    METHOD: A qualitative constant comparative approach, influenced by principles of grounded theory, was used to analyse the interviews. Thirteen participants were interviewed in the home setting 6 months after the stroke.

    RESULTS: Experiences and desire to master eating situations varied, and was related to values and previous habits. Eating difficulties were experienced as disgusting, uncomfortable, strenuous, or unproblematic and not implying shame. Getting help from others could be experienced as embarrassing and undesirable. In particular, eating could be more difficult when eating in company of unfamiliar people. The participants found new ways of mastering eating situations. Some had regained former routines.

    CONCLUSIONS: Old values and habits and/or involvement of other people were the basis of mastering eating situations. New ways of mastering were found, some accepted, and got used to the new situation. Some regained former routines. This knowledge could contribute to health care personnel's awareness of each patient's individual values and previous habits during the rehabilitation process. A dialogue is needed with the person suffering from eating difficulties after stroke, to help create the best possible individual conditions for mastering eating situations.

  • 27. Medin, Jörgen
    et al.
    Larson, Jenny
    von Arbin, Magnus
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University College.
    Tham, Kerstin
    Striving for control in eating situations after stroke2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 24, no 4, 772-80 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    UNLABELLED: THE STUDY'S RATIONALE: Eating difficulties are common after stroke. However, to better meet individuals' needs, in terms of care, support and rehabilitation after stroke, it was considered important to know more about how patients with stroke experience their eating difficulties while in process of regaining their ability.

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to explore the experience of eating difficulties among patients with stroke 3 months after stroke onset. METHODOLOGICAL DESIGN AND JUSTIFICATION: A qualitative interpretive descriptive approach was used. The analysis was based on constant comparative approach, using the principles of grounded theory.

    RESEARCH METHODS: The study included 14 participants with stroke and eating difficulties. A semi-structured interview guide with open-ended questions and probes was used. The interview guide was gradually modified during the data collection process. The interviews were digital audio recorded and fully transcribed. Memos were documented simultaneously with the analysis. Instruments:  A structured observation of a meal verified eating difficulties, and semi-structured interviews were conducted.

    RESULTS: 'Striving for control' emerged as a tentative core category. The participants related their striving for control to 'eating safely', and 'eating properly'; they also had to analyse the consequences of their eating difficulties, being careful when eating, and/or avoiding activities. Some also felt a need of help from others. Those others could remind and provide advice in this matter.

    CONCLUSION: This study highlights the complexity of having eating difficulties after stroke. Aspects related to the participants' striving for control are based on different strategies to eat safely and properly. Nurses can use this knowledge to support patients in their strive for control by observing them in eating situations. In addition, nurses can also ask them to describe and make explicit the experience of eating situations after stroke.

  • 28.
    Medin, Jörgen
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Windahl, Jenny
    von Arbin, Magnus
    Tham, Kerstin
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Eating difficulties among patients 3 months after stroke in relation to the acute phase2012In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 68, no 3, 580-589 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim.  This paper is a report of a study comparing eating difficulties among patients 3 months after stroke in relation to the acute phase. Background.  There is limited knowledge of patients with eating problems early after stroke, hence the progress of eating abilities needs to be further explored. Method.  From March 2007 to June 2008 36 stroke patients with 2-7 eating difficulties or problems with reduced alertness or swallowing in the acute phase were included. Eating difficulties were detected using a structured protocol of observation of meals. In addition, stroke severity (National Institute of Health Stroke Scale), functional status (Barthel Index), unilateral neglect (Line Bisection test and Letter Cancellation test), psychological well-being (The Well-being Questionnaire-12), nutritional status (Mini Nutritional Assessment) and oral status (Revised Oral Assessment Guide) were assessed. Results.  There were 36 participants (58% female) with a median age of 74·5 years. The proportion of eating difficulties decreased significantly from the acute phase to the 3-month follow-up in 'sitting position', 'managing food on the plate' and 'manipulating food in the mouth' and increased regarding inadequate food consumption. Improvements were shown at 3 months in stroke severity, functional status, nutritional status and neglect. Oral status and psychological well-being remained unchanged. Conclusion.  The majority of eating problems persisted 3 months after stroke despite a marked improvement in most of the physical functions. The unchanged psychological well-being and sustained problems with food consumption indicate that factors other than physical function should be taken into account regarding eating difficulties poststroke.

  • 29.
    Medin, Jörgen
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Windahl, Jenny
    von Arbin, Magnus
    Tham, Kerstin
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Eating difficulties among stroke patients in the acute state: a descriptive, cross-sectional, comparative study2011In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 20, no 17-18, 2563-72 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To examine eating difficulties among stroke patients - a comparison between women and men.

    BACKGROUND: Gender differences have been reported in studies of stroke, but the findings are inconclusive and few of these studies have specifically focused on gender differences in eating difficulties.

    DESIGN: This study was a descriptive, cross-sectional, comparative study.

    METHOD: Patients with stroke were recruited at a general hospital in Sweden. To detect eating difficulties, individual observations of the patients were made during one meal using a structured observation protocol. Assessment also included measurements of nutritional and oral status, degree of independence, stroke severity, neglect and well-being.

    RESULTS: One hundred and four patients (53·8% women) were included in the study. The proportion of stroke patients with one or more eating difficulties was 81·7%. The most common eating difficulties were 'managing food on the plate' (66·3%), 'food consumption' (54·8%) and 'sitting position' (45·2%). Women had lower 'food consumption', more severe stroke (p = 0·003), worse functional status (p = 0·001) and lower quality of life (QoL) (p=0·038) than men. More women than men were malnourished and living alone. After adjustment for functional status and motor arm, the odds ratio of having difficulties with food consumption was four times higher among women than men (1·7-9·4, confidence interval 95%).

    CONCLUSIONS: More women than men with stroke suffered from inadequate food consumption. The women had more severe strokes, experienced poorer QoL and showed lower functional status than the men. In the rehabilitation process of women with stroke, these factors should be taken into consideration.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Structured observation of meals, including assessment of food consumption, might be necessary in acute stroke care to detect patients, especially women, who might need closer supervision and nutritional intervention.

  • 30. Rådestad, Ingela
    et al.
    Säflund, Karin
    Wredling, Regina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Onelöv, Erik
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Holding a stillborn baby: mother's feelings of tenderness and grief2009In: British Journal of Midwifery, ISSN 0969-4900, Vol. 17, no 3, 178-80 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Actions by health professionals and the atmosphere surrounding the birth of a stillborn baby may determine the nature of the mother’s contact with her baby. A questionnaire studied mothers’ feelings when holding their stillborn baby. A total of 33 mothers of stillborn babies born after 22 weeks completed the questionnaire three months after the birth. All mothers saw their baby. Before meeting the baby, 23 women had feelings of being afraid. Thirty-one mothers held their baby. When holding their baby all mothers felt tenderness and grief, 29 warmth and 25 prides. Fifteen mothers at the same time felt insecure when holding the baby, 12 had feelings of discomfort and 11 feelings of fear. A hypothesis for future investigations is that the more that a mother can be prepared for what is to come after birth, the better the chance that feelings of fear or discomfort can be diminished.

1 - 30 of 30
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf