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  • 1.
    Anderbro, Therese
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Behavior change intervention and fear of hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Individuals with type 1 diabetes require lifelong insulin supply as well as behavioral adjustments for good treatment result. Only a minority reach the goal for glycemic control set in order to reduce the risk of severe long-term complications. Interventions based on cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) have been proposed to improve diabetes-management, but evidence for its efficacy in adults with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes is sparse. One common barrier to optimal diabetes-management is fear of hypoglycemia (FOH), especially in those who have experienced severe hypoglycemic episodes. Thus there is a need for a valid and reliable instrument to assess individuals who are affected by FOH. It is also vital to identify factors associated with FOH in order to find targets for interventions to reduce fear.Aim: The overall aims of this thesis were to evaluate a CBT intervention for poorly controlled individuals with type 1 diabetes and to explore fear of hypoglycemia in an effort to gain deeper knowledge of possible targets for interventions to reduce FOH.Methods: All four studies applied quantitative designs. Study I was a randomized controlled trial in which a cognitive behavioral intervention was evaluated on poorly controlled adult persons with type 1 diabetes. Study II was a psychometric evaluation of a Swedish version of the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey (HFS) in a survey study in adult persons with type 1 diabetes. Studies III and IV were cross-sectional survey studies employed on adults with type 1 diabetes exploring disease-specific, demographic, (studies III and IV) emotional and psychosocial factors (study IV) related to FOH.Results and conclusions: Study I: The intervention group receiving CBT showed significant improvements in HbA1c, diabetes related distress, well-being, FOH, perceived stress, anxiety and depression as well as frequency in self monitoring of blood glucose. Study II: A three- factor solution was found for the Swedish version of the HFS with the dimensions Worry, Behavior and Aloneness. Cronbach’s alpha for the total scale was 0.85 and varied between 0.63 – 0.89 in the subscales. Convergent validity was also supported with moderate correlation between Swe-HFS and Swe-PAID-20. The Swe-HFS seems to be a reliable and valid instrument to measure FOH in adults with type 1 diabetes. Study III: Seven hundred and sixty- four persons (55%) responded to the questionnaire. The HFS-Worry subscale was significantly associated with frequency of severe hypoglycemia, number of symptoms during mild hypoglycemia, gender, hypoglycemic symptoms during hyperglycemia and hypoglycemic unawareness. The HFS-Aloneness subscale was significantly associated with frequency of severe hypoglycemia, number of symptoms during mild hypoglycemia, gender, frequency of mild hypoglycemia, HbA1c, hypoglycaemic unawareness and visits to the emergency room because of severe hypoglycemia. FOH proved to be more prevalent in females. Frequency of severe hypoglycemia was identified as the most important factor associated with FOH. Study IV: A total of 469 (61%) persons responded to the questionnaire. The HFS was significantly associated with The Anxiety Sensitivity Index, the Anxiety subscale of Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Social Phobia Scale. Together with the disease-specific factors the regression model explained 39% of the variance. Support for a positive association between FOH and anxiety was present and previously identified gender differences were confirmed. Differences between the subgroups on factors associated with FOH were found that may have implications in developing interventions

  • 2.
    Anderbro, Therese
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Bolinder, J
    Lins, P-E
    Wredling, Regina
    Moberg, E
    Lisspers, J
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    The role of emotional and psychosocial factors in relation to fear of hypoglycemia in adults with type 1 diabetesArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Anderbro, Therese
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Bolinder, J.
    Lins, Per-Eric
    Wredling, Regina
    Moberg, E.
    Lisspers, Jan
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Pscyhosocial aspects of fear of hypoglycemia2012In: FEND 17th Annual Conference, 2012, 18- p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Botond, Agnes
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Positiv posttraumatisk personlighetsutveckling: om Posttraumatic Growth (PTG) och dess kliniska relevans2009In: Psykisk hälsa, ISSN 0033-3212, Vol. 50, no 2, 39-43 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Botond, Agnes
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Studenters kognition - "svart på vitt"2013In: Universitetsläraren, ISSN 0282-4973, no 10-11, 26-27 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Botond, Agnes
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Trauma kan leda till positiv personlighetsutveckling2009In: Psykologtidningen, ISSN 0280-9702, Vol. 55, no 7, 15-17 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7. Hedegaard, Joel
    et al.
    Ahl, Helene
    Rovio-Johansson, Airi
    Siouta, Eleni
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Gendered communicative construction of patients in consultation settings2014In: Women & health, ISSN 1541-0331, Vol. 54, no 6, 513-29 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to explore the communication in consultations between patients and health care staff from a gender perspective. We used 23 tape-recorded consultations between patients with Atrial Fibrillation and 5 nurses and 5 physicians at cardiac outpatient clinics at 6 different hospitals in southern Sweden during autumn 2009 to explore the verbal gendered constructions of patients. Through critical discourse analysis, we revealed that the male patients tended to describe their ailments with performance-oriented statements, whereas the female patients usually used emotional-oriented statements. The staff downplayed the male patients' questions and statements, while they acknowledged concern toward the female patients. Both the patients and the staff made conclusions according to a mutual construction. Male patients were constructed as competent, and female patients as fragile through gender-stereotypical communication. Open-ended statements and questions enabled consultations to be less limited by gender stereotypes.

  • 8. Hedegaard, Joel
    et al.
    Rovio-Johansson, Airi
    Siouta, Eleni
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Communicative construction of native versus non-native Swedish speaking patients in consultation settings2014In: Offentlig Förvaltning. Scandinavian Journal of Public Administration, ISSN 2000-8058, E-ISSN 2001-3310, Vol. 17, no 4, 21-47 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we examine patient-centered care through analyzing communicative constructions of patients, on the basis of their native language, in consultations with physicians. Whereas patient-centered care is of current interest in health care, research has not addressed its implications in this dimension. Previous studies indicate that non-native Swedish speaking patients, experience substandard interpersonal treatment far more than native Swedish speaking patients. Our findings show that the non-native Swedish speaking patients presented themselves as participating, whereas the native Swedish speaking patients presented themselves as amenable. The physicians responded in two different ways, argumentatively towards the non-native Swedish speaking patients and acknowledging vis-à-vis the native Swedish speaking patients. When decisions and conclusions were made by the patients and physicians, this resulted in preservation of the status quo in the consultations with the non-native Swedish speaking patients, while the corresponding result with the native Swedish speaking patients was monitoring of their health status. So, whereas the non-native Swedish speaking patients actually were model patient-centered care patients, physicians were more amenable towards the native Swedish speaking patients. We suggest that patient-centered care is desirable, but its practical application must be more thoroughly scrutinized from both a patient and a health care worker perspective.

  • 9. Hylin, Uffe
    et al.
    Nyholm, Helena
    Sophiahemmet University College.
    Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine
    Sophiahemmet University College.
    Ponzer, Sari
    Interprofessional training in clinical practice on a training ward for healthcare students: a two-year follow-up2007In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, Vol. 21, no 3, 277-88 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This follow-up study describes the former students' lasting impressions of a two-week interprofessional course on a training ward aimed at enhancing the understanding of the roles of other professions and the importance of communication for teamwork and for patient care as well as providing an opportunity for profession-specific training. A questionnaire with both closed and open-ended questions was sent to 633 former students two years after the course and 348 (55%) responded. The course was rated as very good and most of the former students had lasting and positive impressions. Ninety-two percent of respondents encouraged teamwork in their present work and 90% wanted to retain the course. The qualitative analysis of the open-ended questions resulted in five categories describing students' perceptions: professional role development, working in teams, tutoring, patient care and future aspects of the course and real world practice. Our results suggest that interprofessional training during undergraduate education provides lasting impressions that may promote teamwork in students' future occupational life.

  • 10.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Kaila, Päivi
    Ahlner-Elmqvist, Marianne
    Leksell, Janeth
    Isoaho, Hannu
    Saarikoski, Mikko
    Clinical learning environment, supervision and nurse teacher evaluation scale: psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version2010In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 66, no 9, 2085-93 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is a report of the development and psychometric testing of the Swedish version of the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher evaluation scale. Background. To achieve quality assurance, collaboration between the healthcare and nursing systems is a pre-requisite. Therefore, it is important to develop a tool that can measure the quality of clinical education. The Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher evaluation scale is a previously validated instrument, currently used in several universities across Europe. The instrument has been suggested for use as part of quality assessment and evaluation of nursing education. Methods. The scale was translated into Swedish from the English version. Data were collected between March 2008 and May 2009 among nursing students from three university colleges, with 324 students completing the questionnaire. Exploratory factor analysis was performed on the 34-item scale to determine construct validity and Cronbach's alpha was used to measure the internal consistency. Results. The five sub-dimensions identified in the original scale were replicated in the exploratory factor analysis. The five factors had explanation percentages of 60.2%, which is deemed sufficient. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the total scale was 0.95, and varied between 0.96 and 0.75 within the five sub-dimensions. Conclusion. The Swedish version of Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher evaluation scale has satisfactory psychometric properties and could be a useful quality instrument in nursing education. However, further investigation is required to develop and evaluate the questionnaire.

  • 11. Kalén, Susanne
    et al.
    Lachmann, Hanna
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Varttinen, Maria
    Möller, Riitta
    Bexelius, Tomas S
    Ponzer, Sari
    Medical students' experiences of their own professional development during three clinical terms: a prospective follow-up study.2017In: BMC Medical Education, ISSN 1472-6920, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 17, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A modern competency-based medical education is well implemented globally, but less is known about how the included learning activities contribute to medical students' professional development. The aim of this study was to explore Swedish medical students' perceptions of the offered learning activities and their experiences of how these activities were connected to their professional development as defined by the CanMEDS framework.

    METHODS: A prospective mixed method questionnaire study during three terms (internal medicine, scientific project, and surgery) in which data were collected by using contextual activity sampling system, i.e., the students were sent a questionnaire via their mobile phones every third week. All 136 medical students in the 6th of 11 terms in the autumn of 2012 were invited to participate. Seventy-four students (54%) filled in all of the required questionnaires (4 per term) for inclusion, the total number of questionnaires being 1335. The questionnaires focused on the students' experiences of learning activities, especially in relation to the CanMEDS Roles, collaboration with others and emotions (positive, negative, optimal experiences, i.e., "flow") related to the studies. The quantitative data was analysed statistically and, for the open-ended questions, manifest inductive content analysis was used.

    RESULTS: Three of the CanMEDs Roles, Medical Expert, Scholar, and Communicator, were most frequently reported while the four others, e.g., the role Health Advocate, were less common. Collaboration with students from other professions was most usual during the 8th term. Positive emotions and experience of "flow" were most often reported during clinical learning activities while the scientific project term was connected with more negative emotions.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our results showed that it is possible, even during clinical courses, to visualise the different areas of professional competence defined in the curriculum and connect these competences to the actual learning activities. Students halfway through their medical education considered the most important learning activities for their professional development to be connected with the Roles of Medical Expert, Scholar, and Communicator. Given that each of the CanMEDS Roles is at least moderately important during undergraduate medical education, the entire spectrum of the Roles should be emphasised and developed during the clinical years.

  • 12.
    Lachmann, Hanna
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Interprofessionellt lärande i verksamhetsförlagd utbildning2017In: Vårdpedagogik: vårdens kärnkompetenser från ett pedagogiskt perspektiv / [ed] Margret Lepp & Janeth Leksell, Stockholm: Liber, 2017, 1, 218-234 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Lachmann, Hanna
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Fossum, Bjöörn
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Karlgren, Klas
    Ponzer, Sari
    Promoting reflection by using contextual activity sampling: a study on students' interprofessional learning2014In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 28, no 5, 400-406 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Students' engagement and reflection on learning activities are important during interprofessional clinical practice. The contextual activity sampling system (CASS) is a methodology designed for collecting data on experiences of ongoing activities by frequent distribution of questionnaires via mobile phones. The aim of this study was to investigate if the use of the CASS methodology affected students' experiences of their learning activities, readiness for interprofessional learning, academic emotions and experiences of interprofessional team collaboration. Student teams, consisting of 33 students in total from four different healthcare programs, were randomized into an intervention group that used CASS or into a control group that did not use CASS. Both quantitative (questionnaires) and qualitative (interviews) data were collected. The results showed that students in the intervention group rated teamwork and collaboration significantly higher after than before the course, which was not the case in the control group. On the other hand, the control group reported experiencing more stress than the intervention group. The qualitative data showed that CASS seemed to support reflection and also have a positive impact on students' experiences of ongoing learning activities and interprofessional collaboration. In conclusion, the CASS methodology provides support for students in their understanding of interprofessional teamwork.

  • 14.
    Lauffs, Monica
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University College.
    Ponzer, Sari
    Saboonchi, Fredrik
    Sophiahemmet University College.
    Lonka, Kirsti
    Hylin, Uffe
    Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine
    Sophiahemmet University College.
    Cross-cultural adaptation of the Swedish version of Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS)2008In: Medical education, ISSN 1365-2923, Vol. 42, no 4, 405-11 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT: Interprofessional learning activities in health care are being gradually introduced on an international basis and therefore cross-cultural and internationally collaborative research into the outcomes of these activities is needed. Hence, it is necessary not only to translate research instruments into the language of the culture in which they are to be used, but also to adapt them culturally if they are to fulfil the testing purposes for which they are intended. It is also necessary to test a translated instrument in order to ensure that it retains its intended psychometric properties. METHODS: In the present study, the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) was adapted for use in a Swedish student population. Cross-cultural adaptation was performed according to recommended guidelines. The Swedish version was tested on a group of students from various health care professions (n = 214). Cronbach's alpha coefficient was adopted to ensure internal consistency. RESULTS: Minor discrepancies during the different translation processes were identified and corrected. Confirmatory factor analysis suggests that the model had an acceptable fit, implying that the factor structure of the scale did not undergo any significant changes by being subjected to translation. The psychometric qualities of the instrument were comparable with those of the English-language version. CONCLUSIONS: This study presents the cross-cultural adaptation of the RIPLS and demonstrates that its subscale Teamwork and Collaboration is the only reliable subscale. The other 2 subscales (Professional Identity, and Roles and Responsibilities) probably require further scrutiny and development, at least in the Swedish population.

  • 15. Lundh, Lars-Gunnar
    et al.
    Saboonchi, Fredrik
    Sophiahemmet University College.
    Wangby, Margit
    The role of personal standards in clinically significant perfectionism: a person-oriented approach to the study of patterns of perfectionism2008In: Cognitive Therapy and Research, ISSN 0147-5916, Vol. 32, no 3, 333-50 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinically significant perfectionism is defined as patterns of perfectionism which are over-represented in clinical samples and under-represented in non-clinical samples. The present study contrasted two hypotheses about what characterizes clinically significant perfectionism: the two-factor theory and perfectionism/acceptance theory. First, a person-oriented approach by means of cluster analysis was used to identify typical patterns of perfectionism. These clusters were then cross-tabulated with two clinical samples (patients with social phobia and patients with panic disorder) and a non-clinical sample. The results showed that patterns of clinically significant perfectionism combined high Concern over Mistakes (CM) and Doubts about Action (DA) with high Personal Standards (PS) (and to a lesser extent also high Organization)--which is consistent with perfectionism/acceptance theory, but at odds with the two factor theory. The results illustrate the value of a person-oriented methodological approach as a complement to the traditional variable-oriented approach.

  • 16. Ponzer, Sari
    et al.
    Hylin, Uffe
    Kusoffsky, Ann
    Lauffs, Monica
    Sophiahemmet University College.
    Lonka, Kirsti
    Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine
    Sophiahemmet University College.
    Nordström, Gun
    Interprofessional training in the context of clinical practice: goals and students' perceptions on clinical education wards2004In: Medical Education, ISSN 0308-0110, Vol. 38, no 7, 727-36 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: This paper describes the context of interprofessional training on clinical education wards (CEWs) and reports students' perceptions of this type of interprofessional and professional training. CONTEXT: A 2-week interprofessional clinical course was designed for medical students in their surgical eighth term, and nursing, occupational therapy and physiotherapy students, all in their sixth term. Clinical tutors were responsible for the patients and also supervised the students. The goals for the students included: to provide the patients with good medical care, nursing and rehabilitation; to develop their own professional roles; to enhance their level of understanding of the other professions; to stress the importance of good communication for teamwork and for patient care; to enhance understanding of the role of the patient, and to become more aware of ethical aspects of health care. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A questionnaire developed by teachers from the 4 educational departments was used. A total of 962 students responded (78%). RESULTS: The CEWs provided the students with good clinical practice in terms of training in their own professions as well in learning more about the other professions. The importance of good communication for teamwork and for patient care was recognised. The quality of supervision and students' perception of their own professional roles were important factors regarding satisfaction with the CEW course. CONCLUSIONS: The CEW course seemed to provide the students with an opportunity to develop their own professional roles and their functions as team members.

  • 17.
    Prahl, Charlotte
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Den frånvarande dialogen: Om en utbildningssatsning inom demensvård2010Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Educational investments may serve several purposes. They can be carried out in order to increase the students’ knowledge within a specific discipline, but also to increase the level of knowledge within an organization. ’Silviahemmet’ in Stockholm, which was inaugurated in the year of 1996, had as one of its objectives to become a school for education of assistant nurses working in the area of dementia care. The educational program had the aim to educate assistant nurses to become supervisors in dementia care, the assistant nurses should acquire an edge competence in the close care of patients with dementia. This educational investment has been investigated in order to study the significance an educational investment may have for a health care organization in which some of the health care personnel has participated in an education and moreover, to study how this knowledge is communicated within the organization.

    Thus, the overall purpose of my study is to describe and analyse the significance an educational investment is given, by the participating assistant nurses as well as by other health care personnel. The study was carried out during the year 2005 and concerned assistant nurses educated in the years between 1996 and 2001. Four different data gathering techniques were used; questionnaires, interviews, observations at two workplaces and conversations with health care personnel. The questionnaire concerned all 34 assistant nurses who had participated in specialist training in dementia care during this period. Seven persons were interviewed.

    Summing up my results, the knowledge that the assistant nurses have achieved from the education is theoretical and social knowledge of dementia. This constituted a platform to stand on for the assistant nurses in their work when meeting the patient

    An important result of the study, concerning the importance of the assistant nurses specialist training for other categories of health care personnel, is the lack of verbal communication between personnel categories that seems to be at hand. Furthermore, dialogues or shared reflections among the personnel could not be noticed. Often it was solely one-way communication that existed on the wards. A knowledge creating dialogue was missing. Questions were asked, but only regarding about "what" and "when" a work task should be performed, not "why" something should be carried out.

    An obstacle regarding the communication of new knowledge appears to be the gap existing between an educational investment and the everyday reality of the health care organization. The result of the study shows the importance of adopting the theoretical knowledge to the reality that the health care personnel is facing. Other obstacles seem to be status and hierarchies.

    The study showed that the assistant nurses working hours did not allow for educating health care personnel in dementia. There ought to be possibilities within the organization to make space for the use and communication of new knowledge through the supervising of health care personnel caring for elderly with dementia. This in turn may lead to better health care for elderly. This supervision could take the form of a dialogue and shared reflections concerning the patients and their need of health care.

  • 18.
    Randers, Ingrid
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University College.
    Krakau, Ingvar
    Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine
    Sophiahemmet University College.
    The activating instructional approach: a practical strategy for teaching ethical geriatric health care2004In: International Nursing Perspectives, ISSN 1592-6478, Vol. 4, no 1, 21-32 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Saboonchi, Fredrik
    Sophiahemmet University College.
    Den skapande människans tolerans:  2012In: Tolerera: en antologi om intolerans och tolerans ur ett psykologiskt perspektiv / [ed] Jon Brunberg, Stockholm: Jon Brunberg Förlag , 2012, 17-37 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Saboonchi, Fredrik
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University College.
    Lundh, Lars-Gunnar
    Perfectionism, anger, somatic health, and positive affect2003In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, Vol. 35, no 7, 1585-99 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The associations between perfectionism, anger, somatic health, and positive affect were examined in 184 Swedish adults from a randomly selected population sample. Somewhat unexpectedly, trait anger was found to be associated with self-oriented perfectionism rather than with socially prescribed perfectionism. Both socially prescribed perfectionism and self-oriented perfectionism showed weak positive correlations with self-reported somatic complaints, particularly symptoms of tension and fatigue, and more clearly in women than in men, whereas other-oriented perfectionism appeared as a predictor of whether the participants were undergoing medical treatment or not. Finally, the results did not support the notion of self-oriented perfectionism representing a positive, adaptive dimension of perfectionism; on the contrary, this dimension was found to be negatively associated with positive affect.

  • 21. Theander, Kersti
    et al.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Florin, Jan
    Gardulf, Ann
    Johansson, Eva
    Lindholm, Christina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Nordström, Gun
    Nilsson, Jan
    Adjusting to future demands in healthcare: Curriculum changes and nursing students' self-reported professional competence2015In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 37, 178-183 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Nursing competence is of significant importance for patient care. Newly graduated nursing students rate their competence as high. However, the impact of different designs of nursing curricula on nursing students' self-reported nursing competence areas is seldom reported.

    OBJECTIVES: To compare newly graduated nursing students' self-reported professional competence before and after the implementation of a new nursing curriculum. The study had a descriptive comparative design. Nursing students, who graduated in 2011, having studied according to an older curriculum, were compared with those who graduated in 2014, after a new nursing curriculum with more focus on person-centered nursing had been implemented.

    SETTING: A higher education nursing program at a Swedish university.

    PARTICIPANTS: In total, 119 (2011 n=69, 2014 n=50) nursing students responded.

    METHODS: Nursing students' self-reported professional competencies were assessed with the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) scale.

    RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the two groups of nursing students, who graduated in 2011 and 2014, respectively, with regard to age, sex, education, or work experience. Both groups rated their competencies as very high. Competence in value-based nursing was perceived to be significantly higher after the change in curriculum. The lowest competence, both in 2011 and 2014, was reported in education and supervision of staff and students.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that newly graduated nursing students - both those following the old curriculum and the first batch of students following the new one - perceive that their professional competence is high. Competence in value-based nursing, measured with the NPC scale, was reported higher after the implementation of a new curriculum, reflecting curriculum changes with more focus on person-centered nursing.

  • 22.
    Westerbotn, Margareta
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Kneck, Åsa
    Hovland, Olav Johannes
    Elrond, Malene
    Pedersen, Ingrid
    Lejonqvist, Gun-Britt
    Dulavik, Johild
    Ecklon, Tove
    Nilsson, Inga-Lill
    Sigurdardottir, Árún K
    Taking part in Nordic collaboration; nursing students' experiences and perceptions from a learning perspective: A qualitative study2015In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 35, no 5, 712-717 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Nordic networking of different kinds has a long tradition aiming to increase collaboration and understanding between citizens in different countries. Cultural competence in relation to health care and nursing is important for clinical nurses and is a central issue in nurse education.

    OBJECTIVE: To gain an understanding of what nurse students experienced and learned during an intensive course in diabetes together with students and nurse educators from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden and the Faroe Islands.

    METHODS: In 2012, an intensive course within the Nordic network, Nordkvist, was conducted in Faroe Islands with the theme "Nursing - to live a good life with diabetes". To answer the objective of the study, 26 students conducted written reflections based on two questions. The data was analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: Through meetings with nurse students and educators from the Nordic countries the intensive course strengthened the students' identification with the nursing profession. The students gained new perspectives on diabetes, such as how complex it can be to live with a chronic illness. Because of the difficulties in understanding one another and because of different mother tongues, the students gained a better understanding of patients' vulnerability in relation to hospital jargon and how it felt to be in an unfamiliar place.

    CONCLUSIONS: The intensive course increased the students' personal and professional growth, cross-cultural competence, and their identification with nursing. Students' understanding of health care in the Nordic countries improved as similarities and differences were recognized.

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