shh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Axelsson, Lena
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Alvariza, Anette
    Lindberg, Jenny
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Reimertz, Helene
    Fürst, Carl Johan
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Unmet palliative care needs among patients with end-stage kidney disease: A national registry study about the last week of life2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Axelsson, Lena
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Alvariza, Anette
    Lindberg, Jenny
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Reimertz, Helene
    Fürst, Carl-Johan
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Unmet palliative care needs among patients with end-stage kidney disease: a national registry study about the last week of life2018In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, ISSN 0885-3924, E-ISSN 1873-6513, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 236-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT: End-stage kidney disease (ESKD) is characterized by high physical and psychological burden and therefore, more knowledge about the palliative care provided close to death is needed.

    OBJECTIVES: To describe symptom prevalence, relief and management during the last week of life, as well as end-of-life communication, in patients with ESKD.

    METHODS: This study was based on data from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care. Patients aged 18 or older who died from a chronic kidney disease, with or without dialysis treatment (ICD-10-SE; N18.5 or N18.9), during 2011 and 2012 were selected.

    RESULTS: 472 patients were included. Of six predefined symptoms, pain was the most prevalent (69%), followed by respiratory secretion (46%), anxiety (41%), confusion (30%), shortness of breath (22%), and nausea (17%). Of patients with pain and/or anxiety, 32% and 44% respectively were only partly relieved or not relieved at all. Of patients with the other symptoms, a majority (55%-84%) were partly relieved or not relieved at all. End-of-life discussions were reported in 41% of patients and 71% of families. A minority died in specialized palliative care: 8% in hospice/in-patient palliative care and 5% in palliative home care. Of all patients, 19% died alone. Bereavement support was offered to 38% of families.

    CONCLUSION: Even if death is expected, the majority of patients dying with ESKD had unmet palliative care needs regarding symptom management, advance care planning, and bereavement support.

  • 3. Harding, Richard
    et al.
    Marchetti, Stefano
    Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D
    Wilson, Donna M
    Ruiz-Ramos, Miguel
    Cardenas-Turanzas, Maria
    Rhee, YongJoo
    Morin, Lucas
    Hunt, Katherine
    Teno, Joan
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Houttekier, Dirk
    Deliens, Luc
    Cohen, Joachim
    Place of death for people with HIV: a population-level comparison of eleven countries across three continents using death certificate data2018In: BMC Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1471-2334, E-ISSN 1471-2334, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: With over 1 million HIV-related deaths annually, quality end-of-life care remains a priority. Given strong public preference for home death, place of death is an important consideration for quality care. This 11 country study aimed to i) describe the number, proportion of all deaths, and demographics of HIV-related deaths; ii) identify place of death; iii) compare place of death to cancer patients iv), determine patient/health system factors associated with place of HIV-related death.

    METHODS: In this retrospective analysis of death certification, data were extracted for the full population (ICD-10 codes B20-B24) for 1-year period: deceased's demographic characteristics, place of death, healthcare supply.

    RESULTS: i) 19,739 deaths were attributed to HIV. The highest proportion (per 1000 deaths) was for Mexico (9.8‰), and the lowest Sweden (0.2‰). The majority of deaths were among men (75%), and those aged <50 (69.1%). ii) Hospital was most common place of death in all countries: from 56.6% in the Netherlands to 90.9% in South Korea. The least common places were hospice facility (3.3%-5.7%), nursing home (0%-17.6%) and home (5.9%-26.3%).iii) Age-standardised relative risks found those with HIV less likely to die at home and more likely to die in hospital compared with cancer patients, and in most countries more likely to die in a nursing home. iv) Multivariate analysis found that men were more likely to die at home in UK, Canada, USA and Mexico; a greater number of hospital beds reduced the likelihood of dying at home in Italy and Mexico; a higher number of GPs was associated with home death in Italy and Mexico.

    CONCLUSIONS: With increasing comorbidity among people ageing with HIV, it is essential that end-of-life preferences are established and met. Differences in place of death according to country and diagnosis demonstrate the importance of ensuring a "good death" for people with HIV, alongside efforts to optimise treatment.

  • 4. O'Sullivan, Anna
    et al.
    Öhlen, Joakim
    Alvariza, Anette
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Adaptation and validation of the VOICES (SF) questionnaire - for evaluation of end-of-life care in Sweden2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Instruments for evaluating end-of-life care by voicing experiences of family members have previously been lacking in Sweden. The objective of this study was therefore to adapt and validate the VOICES (SF) questionnaire to evaluate quality of end-of-life care in Sweden. The VOICES (SF) [Views of Informal Carers - Evaluation of Services (Short form)] is a questionnaire about bereaved relatives' experiences of care in the last three months of life of a deceased family member.

    METHODS: This study was performed based on translation and back translation, cross-cultural adaptation and content validation through cognitive interviewing and feedback from professional experts. For the cognitive interviews, a purposeful sample of 35 bereaved family members was recruited from home care, hospital wards and nursing homes. The participants were 13 men and 22 women (age ranged between 20 and 90+, mean age 66), who were relatives of persons who died from life-limiting conditions. The bereaved family members' and the professional experts' concerns were summarised and analysed based on clarity, understanding, relevance, sensitivity and alternative response/wording.

    RESULTS: The main concerns emerging from the content validation related to the understanding and clarity of some of the questionnaire items', and a few concerns regarding the relevance of different response alternatives or items. Only two of the family members found it emotional to complete the questionnaire, and they still deemed completing it to be important and manageable.

    SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS: The VOICES (SF) can be considered as feasible in the Swedish context, provided that cultural adaptation has been achieved, that is translation alone is not enough. The Swedish version will be available for healthcare professionals to use for quality monitoring of the care provided over the last three months in life, and for research, it enables national and cross-national comparisons between different healthcare places and organisations.

  • 5. Årestedt, Kristofer
    et al.
    Alvariza, Anette
    Boman, Kurt
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Goliath, Ida
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Fürst, Carl Johan
    Brännström, Margareta
    Symptom Relief and Palliative Care during the Last Week of Life among Patients with Heart Failure: A National Register Study2018In: Journal of Palliative Medicine, ISSN 1096-6218, E-ISSN 1557-7740, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 361-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Heart failure is a disease with high morbidity, mortality, and physical and psychological burden. More knowledge about the care provided for patients with heart failure close to death is needed.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to describe key aspects of palliative care during the last week of life in patients with heart failure, as reported by healthcare professionals.

    DESIGN: This is a national register study.

    SETTING/SUBJECTS: The study included 3981 patients with diagnosed heart failure as the underlying cause of death.

    MEASUREMENTS: Data were obtained from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care, a national quality register that focuses on patients' last week of life, independent of diagnosis or care setting. The register includes information about care interventions connected with key aspects of palliative care. Data are reported retrospectively by a nurse or physician at the healthcare unit where the patient dies.

    RESULTS: Only 4.2% of patients with heart failure received specialized palliative care. In their last week of life, symptom prevalence was high, validated scales were seldom used, and symptoms were unsatisfactorily relieved. Around one-fifth (17%) of the patients in the study died alone. Less than half of family members had been offered bereavement support (45%). Moreover, one-third (28%) of the patients and more than half (61%) of the family members were reported to have had end-of-life discussions with a physician during the illness trajectory.

    CONCLUSION: The results indicate inadequate palliative care for patients with heart failure during their last week of life.

  • 6. Öhlén, Joakim
    et al.
    Reimer-Kirkham, Sheryl
    Astle, Barbara
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Lee, Joyce
    Eriksson, Marjukka
    Sawatzky, Richard
    Person-centred care dialectics-Inquired in the context of palliative care2017In: Nursing Philosophy, ISSN 1466-7681, E-ISSN 1466-769X, Vol. 18, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although a widely used concept in health care, person-centred care remains somewhat ambiguous. In the field of palliative care, person-centred care is considered a historically distinct ideal and yet there continues to be a dearth of conceptual clarity. Person-centred care is also challenged by the pull of standardization that characterizes much of health service delivery. The conceptual ambiguity becomes especially problematic in contemporary pluralistic societies, particularly in the light of continued inequities in healthcare access and disparities in health outcomes. Our aim was to explicate premises and underlying assumptions regarding person-centred care in the context of palliative care with an attempt to bridge the apparently competing agendas of individualization versus standardization, and individuals versus populations. By positioning person-centredness in relation to the hermeneutics of the self according to Paul Ricœur, dialectics between individualization and standardization, and between individuals and populations were constructed. The competing agendas were related in a dialectic manner in the way that population health is of importance for the individual, and standardization is of importance for the population. The analysis suggests that person-centred care is an ethical stance, which gives prominence to both suffering and capability of the individual as a person. The dialectic analysis points towards the importance of extending person-centred care to encompass population and societal perspectives and thereby avoiding a problematic tendency of affiliating person-centred care with exclusively individualistic perspectives. Considerations for person-centred palliative care on micro-, meso- and macrolevels conclude the paper.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf