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  • 1. Alvariza, Anette
    et al.
    Holm, Maja
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Benkel, Inger
    Norinder, Maria
    Ewing, Gail
    Grande, Gunn
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Öhlen, Joakim
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    A person-centred approach in nursing: Validity and reliability of the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool2018In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 35, p. 1-8, article id S1462-3889(18)30058-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT) was developed for use among family caregivers in palliative care for assessment of their support needs. The purpose of this study was to translate and evaluate the validity and reliability of the CSNAT in a sample of Swedish family caregivers and nurses in a palliative care context.

    METHODS: Data for this validation study was collected during 2016 in the context of palliative home care in two larger Swedish cities. The study was conducted in three stages to reach conceptual, semantic, operational and measurement equivalence between the original UK version and the Swedish version. Stage I consisted of translation to Swedish. In Stage II, cognitive interviews were performed with 8 family caregivers and 10 nurses. Data were analyzed based on relevance, clarity and sensitivity. In Stage III, the CSNAT and related self-rating measures (caregiver burden, preparedness for caregiving and quality of life) were completed by 118 family caregivers. Data quality, construct validity and test-retest reliability were evaluated.

    RESULTS: The CSNAT items were considered relevant and useful to identify areas of support needs. The Swedish CSNAT showed sound psychometric properties with satisfactory data quality and few problems with missing data across items (1.8%-6.1%). All items except one correlated as expected (rho>0.3) with caregiver burden, supporting construct validity. All items had satisfactory test-retest reliability (κw=0.45-0.75).

    CONCLUSIONS: This study further adds to the validity of the CSNAT and shows in addition that it is reliable and stable for use among family caregivers in palliative care.

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  • 2.
    Axelsson, Lena
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Alvariza, Anette
    Lindberg, Jenny
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Reimertz, Helene
    Fürst, Carl Johan
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Unmet palliative care needs among patients with end-stage kidney disease: A national registry study about the last week of life2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Axelsson, Lena
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Alvariza, Anette
    Lindberg, Jenny
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Reimertz, Helene
    Fürst, Carl-Johan
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Unmet palliative care needs among patients with end-stage kidney disease: a national registry study about the last week of life2018In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, ISSN 0885-3924, E-ISSN 1873-6513, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 236-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT: End-stage kidney disease (ESKD) is characterized by high physical and psychological burden and therefore, more knowledge about the palliative care provided close to death is needed.

    OBJECTIVES: To describe symptom prevalence, relief and management during the last week of life, as well as end-of-life communication, in patients with ESKD.

    METHODS: This study was based on data from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care. Patients aged 18 or older who died from a chronic kidney disease, with or without dialysis treatment (ICD-10-SE; N18.5 or N18.9), during 2011 and 2012 were selected.

    RESULTS: 472 patients were included. Of six predefined symptoms, pain was the most prevalent (69%), followed by respiratory secretion (46%), anxiety (41%), confusion (30%), shortness of breath (22%), and nausea (17%). Of patients with pain and/or anxiety, 32% and 44% respectively were only partly relieved or not relieved at all. Of patients with the other symptoms, a majority (55%-84%) were partly relieved or not relieved at all. End-of-life discussions were reported in 41% of patients and 71% of families. A minority died in specialized palliative care: 8% in hospice/in-patient palliative care and 5% in palliative home care. Of all patients, 19% died alone. Bereavement support was offered to 38% of families.

    CONCLUSION: Even if death is expected, the majority of patients dying with ESKD had unmet palliative care needs regarding symptom management, advance care planning, and bereavement support.

  • 4. Friberg, Febe
    et al.
    Wallengren, Catarina
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Carlsson, Eva
    Smith, Frida
    Pettersson, Monica
    Kenne Sarenmalm, Elisabeth
    Sawatzky, Richard
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Exploration of dynamics in a complex person-centred intervention process based on health professionals' perspectives2018In: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The assessment and evaluation of practical and sustainable development of health care has become a major focus of investigation in health services research. A key challenge for researchers as well as decision-makers in health care is to understand mechanisms influencing how complex interventions work and become embedded in practice, which is significant for both evaluation and later implementation. In this study, we explored nurses' and surgeons' perspectives on performing and participating in a complex multi-centre person-centred intervention process that aimed to support patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer to feel prepared for surgery, discharge and recovery.

    METHOD: Data consisted of retrospective interviews with 20 professionals after the intervention, supplemented with prospective conversational data and field notes from workshops and follow-up meetings (n = 51). The data were analysed to construct patterns in line with interpretive description.

    RESULTS: Although the participants highly valued components of the intervention, the results reveal influencing mechanisms underlying the functioning of the intervention, including multiple objectives, unclear mandates and competing professional logics. The results also reveal variations in processing the intervention focused on differences in using and talking about intervention components.

    CONCLUSIONS: The study indicates there are significant areas of ambiguity in understanding how theory-based complex clinical interventions work and in how interventions are socially constructed and co-created by professionals' experiences, assumptions about own professional practice, contextual conditions and the researchers' intentions. This process evaluation reveals insights into reasons for success or failure and contextual aspects associated with variations in outcomes. Thus, there is a need for further interpretive inquiry, and not only descriptive studies, of the multifaceted characters of complex clinical interventions and how the intervention components are actually shaped in constantly shifting contexts.

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  • 5. Harding, Richard
    et al.
    Marchetti, Stefano
    Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D
    Wilson, Donna M
    Ruiz-Ramos, Miguel
    Cardenas-Turanzas, Maria
    Rhee, YongJoo
    Morin, Lucas
    Hunt, Katherine
    Teno, Joan
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Houttekier, Dirk
    Deliens, Luc
    Cohen, Joachim
    Place of death for people with HIV: a population-level comparison of eleven countries across three continents using death certificate data2018In: BMC Infectious Diseases, E-ISSN 1471-2334, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: With over 1 million HIV-related deaths annually, quality end-of-life care remains a priority. Given strong public preference for home death, place of death is an important consideration for quality care. This 11 country study aimed to i) describe the number, proportion of all deaths, and demographics of HIV-related deaths; ii) identify place of death; iii) compare place of death to cancer patients iv), determine patient/health system factors associated with place of HIV-related death.

    METHODS: In this retrospective analysis of death certification, data were extracted for the full population (ICD-10 codes B20-B24) for 1-year period: deceased's demographic characteristics, place of death, healthcare supply.

    RESULTS: i) 19,739 deaths were attributed to HIV. The highest proportion (per 1000 deaths) was for Mexico (9.8‰), and the lowest Sweden (0.2‰). The majority of deaths were among men (75%), and those aged <50 (69.1%). ii) Hospital was most common place of death in all countries: from 56.6% in the Netherlands to 90.9% in South Korea. The least common places were hospice facility (3.3%-5.7%), nursing home (0%-17.6%) and home (5.9%-26.3%).iii) Age-standardised relative risks found those with HIV less likely to die at home and more likely to die in hospital compared with cancer patients, and in most countries more likely to die in a nursing home. iv) Multivariate analysis found that men were more likely to die at home in UK, Canada, USA and Mexico; a greater number of hospital beds reduced the likelihood of dying at home in Italy and Mexico; a higher number of GPs was associated with home death in Italy and Mexico.

    CONCLUSIONS: With increasing comorbidity among people ageing with HIV, it is essential that end-of-life preferences are established and met. Differences in place of death according to country and diagnosis demonstrate the importance of ensuring a "good death" for people with HIV, alongside efforts to optimise treatment.

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  • 6.
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Kroppslighet2019In: Omvårdnadens grunder: Perspektiv och förhållningssätt, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019, 3, p. 487-507Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Larsdotter, Cecilia
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Tolkande beskrivning2021In: Kvalitativa metoder helt enkelt! / [ed] Gunilla Klingberg & Ulrika Hallberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2021, p. 303-324Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8. Lundberg, Emma
    et al.
    Ozanne, Anneli
    Larsdotter, Cecilia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Böling, Susanna
    Dellenborg, Lisen
    Ensted, Daniel
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Place of death among foreign-born individuals: A national population-based register study2023In: Palliative Care and Social Practice, ISSN 2632-3524, Vol. 17, article id 26323524231185157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Relatively little is known about where foreign-born individuals die in Sweden and how birth region might influence place of death. Thus, there is a need for population-based studies investigating place of death and associated factors among foreign-born individuals.

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to identify variations in place of death among foreign-born individuals residing in Sweden and to compare place of death between the foreign- and domestic-born population. We also examine the association between place of death, underlying cause of death and sociodemographic characteristics among the foreign-born population.

    DESIGN: A population-based register study.

    METHODS: All deceased individuals ⩾18 years of age in Sweden with a registered place of death between 2012 and 2019 (n = 682,697). Among these, 78,466 individuals were foreign-born. Univariable multinomial logistic regression modelling and multivariable multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed.

    RESULTS: Overall, hospital was the most common place of death among the foreign-born population. However, there were variations in place of death related to region of birth. Compared to domestic-born, a higher proportion of foreign-born individuals dies at home, the majority of whom were born on the African continent.

    CONCLUSION: Region of birth is one of the several factors associated with place of death among foreign-born individuals. Further research is needed to explore both preferences and barriers to place of death among foreign-born individuals.

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  • 9. O'Sullivan, Anna
    et al.
    Alvariza, Anette
    Öhlen, Joakim
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Bereaved Family Members' Satisfaction with Care during the Last Three Months of Life for People with Advanced Illness2018In: Healthcare (Basel, Switzerland), ISSN 2227-9032, Vol. 6, no 4, article id E130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Studies evaluating the end-of-life care for longer periods of illness trajectories and in several care places are currently lacking. This study explored bereaved family members' satisfaction with care during the last three months of life for people with advanced illness, and associations between satisfaction with care and characteristics of the deceased individuals and their family members.

    METHODS: A cross-sectional survey design was used. The sample was 485 family members of individuals who died at four different hospitals in Sweden.

    RESULTS: Of the participants, 78.7% rated the overall care as high. For hospice care, 87.1% reported being satisfied, 87% with the hospital care, 72.3% with district/county nurses, 65.4% with nursing homes, 62.1% with specialized home care, and 59.6% with general practitioners (GPs). Family members of deceased persons with cancer were more likely to have a higher satisfaction with the care. A lower satisfaction was more likely if the deceased person had a higher educational attainment and a length of illness before death of one year or longer.

    CONCLUSION: The type of care, diagnoses, length of illness, educational attainment, and the relationship between the deceased person and the family member influences the satisfaction with care.

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  • 10. O'Sullivan, Anna
    et al.
    Alvariza, Anette
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Larsdotter, Cecilia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Support received by family members before, at and after an ill person's death2021In: BMC Palliative Care, E-ISSN 1472-684X, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: It is widely recognised, that family members are central to care of people with advanced illness, and that support should be provided to all family members in need thereof. The aim of this study was to investigate family members' experiences of support received during the last three months of life, at the time of death and after the death of a person with advanced illness.

    METHODS: A retrospective cross-sectional survey design was employed, using the VOICES(SF) questionnaire and multiple methods for data analyses. The sample consisted of 485 bereaved family members (aged: 20-90 years old, 70% women) of people who died in hospital between August 2016-April 2017.

    RESULTS: Of the family members, 58,8% reported they had received enough help and support during the illness, whereas 30,2% had not. Family members' comments about support during the illness were mainly related to care the ill person had or had not received, rather than about support they themselves received. Of all family members, 52,8% reported having had enough support at the time of the ill person's death. Related to support at death, 14,6% reported that the imminence of death was not clear, which was described as having affected their opportunity to be with the dying person at the time of death. Of all, 25,2% had a follow-up conversation after the death, 48% did not and did not want to, and 21% had no follow-up conversation, but would have liked one. A follow-up conversation was described as helpful for the bereavement process, and disappointment was expressed when not receiving support after the death.

    CONCLUSIONS: Family members' experiences of support were partly related to whether the ill person's care needs were fulfilled. Healthcare staff expressing empathy and respect in the care of dying people and their family members were important for family members' experiences of support. Family members' difficulty recognising that death was imminent and the importance of healthcare staff providing them with clear information were expressed in connection with support at death. Follow-up conversations were valued by family members, especially if with a healthcare professional who was present at the time of death.

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  • 11. O'Sullivan, Anna
    et al.
    Alvariza, Anette
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Larsdotter, Cecilia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    The influence of care place and diagnosis on care communication at the end of life: Bereaved family members' perspective2021In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 664-671Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of care place and diagnosis on care communication during the last 3 months of life for people with advanced illness, from the bereaved family members' perspective.

    METHOD: A retrospective survey design using the VOICES(SF) questionnaire with a sample of 485 bereaved family members (aged: 20-90 years old, 70% women) of people who died in hospital was employed to meet the study aim.

    RESULTS: Of the deceased people, 79.2% had at some point received care at home, provided by general practitioners (GPs) (52%), district nurses (36.7%), or specialized palliative home care (17.9%), 27.4% were cared for in a nursing home and 15.7% in a specialized palliative care unit. The likelihood of bereaved family members reporting that the deceased person was treated with dignity and respect by the staff was lowest in nursing homes (OR: 0.21) and for GPs (OR: 0.37). A cancer diagnosis (OR: 2.36) or if cared for at home (OR: 2.17) increased the likelihood of bereaved family members reporting that the deceased person had been involved in decision making regarding care and less likely if cared for in a specialized palliative care unit (OR: 0.41). The likelihood of reports of unwanted decisions about the care was higher if cared for in a nursing home (OR: 1.85) or if the deceased person had a higher education (OR: 2.40).

    SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS: This study confirms previous research about potential inequalities in care at the end of life. The place of care and diagnosis influenced the bereaved family members' reports on whether the deceased person was treated with respect and dignity and how involved the deceased person was in decision making regarding care.

  • 12. O'Sullivan, Anna
    et al.
    Öhlen, Joakim
    Alvariza, Anette
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Adaptation and validation of the VOICES (SF) questionnaire - for evaluation of end-of-life care in Sweden2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 1254-1260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Instruments for evaluating end-of-life care by voicing experiences of family members have previously been lacking in Sweden. The objective of this study was therefore to adapt and validate the VOICES (SF) questionnaire to evaluate quality of end-of-life care in Sweden. The VOICES (SF) [Views of Informal Carers - Evaluation of Services (Short form)] is a questionnaire about bereaved relatives' experiences of care in the last three months of life of a deceased family member.

    METHODS: This study was performed based on translation and back translation, cross-cultural adaptation and content validation through cognitive interviewing and feedback from professional experts. For the cognitive interviews, a purposeful sample of 35 bereaved family members was recruited from home care, hospital wards and nursing homes. The participants were 13 men and 22 women (age ranged between 20 and 90+, mean age 66), who were relatives of persons who died from life-limiting conditions. The bereaved family members' and the professional experts' concerns were summarised and analysed based on clarity, understanding, relevance, sensitivity and alternative response/wording.

    RESULTS: The main concerns emerging from the content validation related to the understanding and clarity of some of the questionnaire items', and a few concerns regarding the relevance of different response alternatives or items. Only two of the family members found it emotional to complete the questionnaire, and they still deemed completing it to be important and manageable.

    SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS: The VOICES (SF) can be considered as feasible in the Swedish context, provided that cultural adaptation has been achieved, that is translation alone is not enough. The Swedish version will be available for healthcare professionals to use for quality monitoring of the care provided over the last three months in life, and for research, it enables national and cross-national comparisons between different healthcare places and organisations.

  • 13. Ozanne, Anneli
    et al.
    Sawatzky, Richard
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Alvariza, Anette
    Fürst, Carl Johan
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Symptom relief during last week of life in neurological diseases2019In: Brain and Behavior, ISSN 2162-3279, E-ISSN 2162-3279, Vol. 9, no 8, article id e01348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate symptom prevalence, symptom relief, and palliative care indicators during the last week of life, comparing them for patients with motor neuron disease (MND), central nervous system tumors (CNS tumor), and other neurological diseases (OND).

    MATERIAL & METHODS: Data were obtained from the Swedish Register for Palliative Care, which documents care during the last week of life. Logistic regression was used to compare patients with MND (n = 419), CNS tumor (n = 799), and OND (n = 1,407) as the cause of death.

    RESULTS: The most prevalent symptoms for all neurological disease groups were pain (52.7% to 72.2%) and rattles (58.1% to 65.6%). Compared to MND and OND, patients with CNS tumors were more likely to have totally relieved pain, shortness of breath, rattles, and anxiety. They were also more likely to have their pain assessed with a validated tool; to receive symptom treatment for anxiety, nausea, rattles, and pain; to have had family members receive end-of-life discussions; to have someone present at death; and to have had their family members offered bereavement support. Both patients with CNS tumor and MND were more likely than patients with OND to receive consultation with a pain unit and to have had end-of-life discussions.

    CONCLUSIONS: The study reveals high symptom burden and differences in palliative care between the groups during the last week of life. There is a need for person-centered care planning based on a palliative approach, focused on improving symptom assessments, relief, and end-of-life conversations.

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  • 14. Sarenmalm, Elisabeth Kenne
    et al.
    Nasic, Salmir
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Carlsson, Eva
    Pettersson, Monica E
    Sawatzky, Richard
    Swedish Version of the Distress Thermometer: Validity Evidence in Patients With Colorectal Cancer2018In: The Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, ISSN 1540-1405, E-ISSN 1540-1413, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 959-966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The objective of this study was to validate the NCCN Distress Thermometer (DT), including the accompanying Problem List (PL), in a Swedish population of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC).

    Methods: A total of 488 patients diagnosed with CRC completed the DT/PL and EORTC core quality-of-life questionnaire (QLQ-C30) before surgery. Construct validity of the PL was analyzed using a confirmatory factor analysis. Internal consistency reliability (ICR) was tested using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Correlations between the reported PL areas and QLQ-C30 function scales were used to explore convergent validity. Discriminant validity was examined by evaluating associations between the DT and QLQ-C30 measures of overall health-related quality of life (HRQoL). R

    esults: Findings showed that the Swedish translation of the DT/PL is consistent with the original English version. The DT has good ICR, with the total number of reported problems significantly correlating with DT scores (r=0.67; P<.001). Analysis of convergent validity indicated that the PL areas significantly correlated with QLQ-C30 function scales, with emotional problems showing the highest correlation (r=0.76; P<.001), and item-level correlation analyses showed significant correlations between symptoms. There was also good discriminant validity between the DT and the QLQ-C30 in terms of HRQoL, including overall health status (r=-0.49; P<.001) and overall quality of life (r=-0.57; P<.001). Furthermore, there was good discriminant validity between the DT and QLQ-C30 regarding poor, moderate, and excellent HRQoL.

    Conclusions: These findings provide validity evidence regarding the DT, including the PL. Findings also show that the DT has good potential for screening distress-related practical, family, emotional, and physical problems during the cancer trajectory in Swedish-speaking patients. Additionally, the DT seems to be an effective screening tool to detect patients with poor, moderate, and excellent HRQoL.

  • 15. Sawatzky, Richard
    et al.
    Larsdotter, Cecilia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Carlsson, Eva
    Pettersson, Monica
    Kenne Sarenmalm, Elisabeth
    Smith, Frida
    Nygren, Jonas
    Russell, Lara
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Predictors of preparedness for recovery following colorectal cancer surgery: A latent class trajectory analysis2023In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 62, no 12, p. 1625-1634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: With an interest in providing knowledge for person-centred care, our overall goal is to contribute a greater understanding of diversity among patients in terms of their preparedness before and up to six months after colorectal cancer surgery. Our aim was to describe and provide a tentative explanation for differences in preparedness trajectory profiles.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was explorative and used prospective longitudinal data from a previously published intervention study evaluating person-centred information and communication. The project was conducted at three hospitals in Sweden. Patient-reported outcomes measures, including the Longitudinal Preparedness for Colorectal Cancer Surgery Questionnaire, were collected before surgery, at discharge, and four to six weeks, three months, and six months after surgery. Clinical data were retrospectively obtained from patients' medical records. We used latent class growth models (LCGMs) to identify latent classes that distinguish subgroups of patients who represent different preparedness trajectory profiles. To determine the most plausible number of latent classes, we considered statistical information about model fit and clinical practice relevance. We used multivariable regression models to identify variables that explain the latent classes.

    RESULTS: The sample (N = 488) comprised people with a mean age of 68 years (SD = 11) of which 44% were women. Regarding diagnoses, 60% had colon cancer and 40% rectal cancer. The LCGMs identified six latent classes with different preparedness for surgery and recovery trajectories. The latent classes were predominantly explained by differences in age, sex, physical classification based on comorbidities, treatment hospital, global health status, distress, and sense of coherence (comprehensibility and meaningfulness).

    CONCLUSION: Contrary to the received view that emphasizes standardized care practices, our results point to the need for adding person-centred and tailored approaches that consider individual differences in how patients are prepared before and during the recovery period related to colorectal cancer surgery.

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  • 16. Årestedt, Kristofer
    et al.
    Alvariza, Anette
    Boman, Kurt
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Goliath, Ida
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Fürst, Carl Johan
    Brännström, Margareta
    Symptom relief and palliative care during the last week of life among patients with heart failure: A national register study2018In: Journal of Palliative Medicine, ISSN 1096-6218, E-ISSN 1557-7740, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 361-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Heart failure is a disease with high morbidity, mortality, and physical and psychological burden. More knowledge about the care provided for patients with heart failure close to death is needed.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to describe key aspects of palliative care during the last week of life in patients with heart failure, as reported by healthcare professionals.

    DESIGN: This is a national register study.

    SETTING/SUBJECTS: The study included 3981 patients with diagnosed heart failure as the underlying cause of death.

    MEASUREMENTS: Data were obtained from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care, a national quality register that focuses on patients' last week of life, independent of diagnosis or care setting. The register includes information about care interventions connected with key aspects of palliative care. Data are reported retrospectively by a nurse or physician at the healthcare unit where the patient dies.

    RESULTS: Only 4.2% of patients with heart failure received specialized palliative care. In their last week of life, symptom prevalence was high, validated scales were seldom used, and symptoms were unsatisfactorily relieved. Around one-fifth (17%) of the patients in the study died alone. Less than half of family members had been offered bereavement support (45%). Moreover, one-third (28%) of the patients and more than half (61%) of the family members were reported to have had end-of-life discussions with a physician during the illness trajectory.

    CONCLUSION: The results indicate inadequate palliative care for patients with heart failure during their last week of life.

  • 17. Öhlén, Joakim
    et al.
    Reimer-Kirkham, Sheryl
    Astle, Barbara
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Lee, Joyce
    Eriksson, Marjukka
    Sawatzky, Richard
    Person-centred care dialectics-Inquired in the context of palliative care2017In: Nursing Philosophy, ISSN 1466-7681, E-ISSN 1466-769X, Vol. 18, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although a widely used concept in health care, person-centred care remains somewhat ambiguous. In the field of palliative care, person-centred care is considered a historically distinct ideal and yet there continues to be a dearth of conceptual clarity. Person-centred care is also challenged by the pull of standardization that characterizes much of health service delivery. The conceptual ambiguity becomes especially problematic in contemporary pluralistic societies, particularly in the light of continued inequities in healthcare access and disparities in health outcomes. Our aim was to explicate premises and underlying assumptions regarding person-centred care in the context of palliative care with an attempt to bridge the apparently competing agendas of individualization versus standardization, and individuals versus populations. By positioning person-centredness in relation to the hermeneutics of the self according to Paul Ricœur, dialectics between individualization and standardization, and between individuals and populations were constructed. The competing agendas were related in a dialectic manner in the way that population health is of importance for the individual, and standardization is of importance for the population. The analysis suggests that person-centred care is an ethical stance, which gives prominence to both suffering and capability of the individual as a person. The dialectic analysis points towards the importance of extending person-centred care to encompass population and societal perspectives and thereby avoiding a problematic tendency of affiliating person-centred care with exclusively individualistic perspectives. Considerations for person-centred palliative care on micro-, meso- and macrolevels conclude the paper.

  • 18. Öhlén, Joakim
    et al.
    Sawatzky, Richard
    Pettersson, Monica
    Sarenmalm, Elisabeth Kenne
    Larsdotter, Cecilia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Smith, Frida
    Wallengren, Catarina
    Friberg, Febe
    Kodeda, Karl
    Carlsson, Eva
    Preparedness for colorectal cancer surgery and recovery through a person-centred information and communication intervention: a quasi-experimental longitudinal design.2019In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 12, article id e0225816Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To meet patients' information and communication needs over time in order to improve their recovery is particularly challenging for patients undergoing cancer surgery. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether an intervention with a person-centred approach to information and communication for patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer undergoing surgery can improve the patients' preparedness for surgery, discharge and recovery during six months following diagnosis and initial treatment. The intervention components involving a novel written interactive patient education material and person-centred communication was based on critical analysis of conventional information and communication for these patients. During 2014-2016, 488 consecutive patients undergoing elective surgery for colorectal cancer were enrolled in a quasi-experimental longitudinal study. In three hospitals, first a conventional care group (n = 250) was recruited, then the intervention was introduced, and finally the intervention group was recruited (n = 238). Patients' trajectories of preparedness for surgery and recovery (Preparedness for Colorectal Cancer Surgery Questionnaire-PCSQ) health related quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30) and distress (NCCS Distress Thermometer) were evaluated based on self-reported data at five time points, from pre-surgery to 6 months. Length of hospital stay and patients' behavior in seeking health care pre- and post-surgery were extracted from patient records. Longitudinal structural equation models were used to test the hypothesized effects over time. Statistically significant positive effects were detected for two of the four PCSQ domains (patients searching for and making use of information, and making sense of the recovery) and for the role functioning domain of the EORTC QLQ-C30. Patients in the intervention group were also more likely to contact their assigned cancer "contact nurse" (a.k.a. nurse navigator) instead of contacting a nurse on duty at the ward or visiting the emergency department. In conclusion, the overall hypothesis was not confirmed. Further research is recommended on written and oral support tools to facilitate person-centred communication.

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