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  • 1. Ericson-Lidman, Eva
    et al.
    Franklin Larsson, Lise-Lotte
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Caring for people with dementia disease (DD) and working in a private not-for-profit residential care facility for people with DD2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 337-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Caring for people with dementia and working in dementia care is described as having both rewarding and unpleasant aspects and has been studied to a minor extent. This study aims to explore care providers' narrated experiences of caring for people with dementia disease (DD) and working in a private not-for-profit residential care facility for people with DD. Nine care providers were interviewed about their experiences, the interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. The analysis revealed that participants were struggling to perform person-centred care, which meant trying to see the person behind the disease, dealing with troublesome situations in the daily care, a two-edged interaction with relatives, feelings of shortcomings and troubled conscience, and the need for improvements in dementia care. The analysis also revealed an ambiguous work situation, which meant a challenging value base, the differently judged work environment, feelings of job satisfaction and the need for a functional leadership and management. The results illuminate participants' positive as well as negative experiences and have identified areas requiring improvements. It seems of great importance to strive for a supportive and attendant leadership, a leadership which aims to empower care providers in their difficult work. Using conscience as a driving force together in the work group may benefit care providers' health.

  • 2.
    Franklin Larsson, Lise-Lotte
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Identitetsvärdighet2013In: Palliativ vård: begrepp & perspektiv i teori och praktik / [ed] Birgitta Andershed, Britt-Marie Ternestedt, Cecilia Håkanson, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 1, p. 185-191Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Malm, Mari-Cristin
    Lindgren, Helena
    Pettersson, Karin
    Franklin Larsson, Lise-Lotte
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Being alone in silence - Mothers' experiences upon confirmation of their baby's death in utero2014In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 30, no 3, p. e91-e95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: to explore mothers' experiences of the confirmation of ultrasound examination results and how they were told that their baby had died in-utero.

    DESIGN: in-depth interviews.

    SETTING: Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: 26 mothers of stillborn babies.

    MEASUREMENT: narratives were analysed using a qualitative content analysis with an inductive approach.

    FINDINGS: the mothers experienced that silence prevailed during the entire process of confirming the ultrasound results. Typically all present in the ultrasound room were concentrating and focusing on what they observed on the screen, no one spoke to the mother. The mothers had an instinctive feeling that their baby might be dead based on what they observed on the ultrasound screen and on their interpretation of the body language of the clinicians and midwives. Some mothers reported a time delay in receiving information about their baby's death. Experiencing uncertainty about the information received was also noticed.

    CONCLUSION: mothers emphasised an awareness of silence and feelings of being completely alone while being told of the baby's death.

    IMPLICATION FOR PRACTICE: the prevalence of silence during an ultrasound examination may in certain cases cause further psychological trauma for the mother of a stillborn baby. One way to move forward given these results may be to provide obstetric personnel sufficient training on how difficult information might be more effectively and sensitively provided in the face of an adverse pregnancy outcome.

  • 4. Seiger Cronfalk, Berit
    et al.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Franklin Larsson, Lise-Lotte
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Henriksen, Eva
    Norberg, Astrid
    Österlind, Jane
    Utilization of palliative care principles in nursing home care: Educational interventions2015In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 1745-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: This study is part of the overarching PVIS (Palliative Care in Nursing Homes) project aimed at building competence in palliative care for nursing home staff. Our objective was to describe nursing home staff's attitudes to competence-building programs in palliative care.

    METHOD: Three different programs were developed by specialist staff from three local palliative care teams. In all, 852 staff at 37 nursing homes in the greater Stockholm area participated. Staff from 7 nursing homes participated in 11 focus-group discussions. Variation in size between the seven nursing homes initiated purposeful selection of staff to take part in the discussions, and descriptive content analysis was used.

    RESULTS: The results suggest that staff reported positive experiences as they gained new knowledge and insight into palliative care. The experiences seemed to be similar independent of the educational program design. Our results also show that staff experienced difficulties in talking about death. Enrolled nurses and care assistants felt that they carried out advanced care without the necessary theoretical and practical knowledge. Further, the results also suggest that lack of support from ward managers and insufficient collaboration and of a common language between different professions caused tension in situations involved in caring for dying people.

    SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS: Nursing home staff experienced competence-building programs in palliative care as useful. Even so, further competence is needed, as is long-term implementation strategies and development of broader communication skills among all professions working in nursing homes.

  • 5. Östlund, Petra
    et al.
    Rüter, Anders
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Franklin Larsson, Lise-Lotte
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Patienters upplevelser av delaktighet i vården: En intervjustudie på en akutvårdsavdelning2016Conference paper (Other academic)
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