shh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Bylund Grenklo, Tove
    et al.
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Hauksdóttir, Arna
    Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur A
    Nyberg, Tommy
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Fürst, Carl Johan
    Self-injury in teenagers who lost a parent to cancer: a nationwide, population-based, long-term follow-up2013In: JAMA pediatrics, ISSN 2168-6211, Vol. 167, no 2, p. 133-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the risk of self-injury in parentally cancer-bereaved youth compared with their nonbereaved peers.

    DESIGN: Population-based study of cancer-bereaved youth and a random sample of matched population controls.

    SETTING: Sweden in 2009 and 2010.

    PARTICIPANTS: A total of 952 youth (74.8%) confirmed to be eligible for the study returned the questionnaire: 622 (73.1%) of 851 eligible young adults who lost a parent to cancer between the ages of 13 and 16 years, in 2000 to 2003, and 330 (78.4%) of 451 nonbereaved peers.

    MAIN EXPOSURE: Cancer bereavement or nonbreavement during the teenage years.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of self-injury after January 1, 2000.

    RESULTS: Among cancer-bereaved youth, 120 (19.5%) reported self-injury compared with 35 (10.6%) of their nonbereaved peers, yielding an OR of 2.0 (95% CI, 1.4-3.0). After controlling for potential confounding factors in childhood (eg, having engaged in self-destructive behavior, having been bullied, having been sexually or physically abused, having no one to share joys and sorrows with, and sex), the adjusted OR was 2.3 (95% CI, 1.4-3.7). The OR for suicide attempts was 1.6 (95% CI, 0.8-3.0).

    CONCLUSIONS: One-fifth of cancer-bereaved youth reported self-injury, representing twice the odds for self-injury in their nonbereaved peers, regardless of any of the adjustments we made. Raised awareness on a broad basis in health care and allied disciplines would enable identification and support provision to this vulnerable group.

  • 2. Bylund Grenklo, Tove
    et al.
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur A
    Nyberg, Tommy
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Fürst, Carl Johan
    Communication and trust in the care provided to a dying parent: a nationwide study of cancer-bereaved youths2013In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 31, no 23, p. 2886-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To assess children's trust in the care provided to a dying parent during the final week of life in relation to end-of-life medical information about disease, treatment, and death.

    METHODS: This nationwide population-based survey included 622 (73%) of 851 youths who, 6 to 9 years earlier, at age 13 to 16 years, lost a parent to cancer. We asked about the children's reception of end-of-life professional information and trust in the care provided. We also asked about depression and several potential risk factors of distrust in the care provided.

    RESULTS: A majority (82%) reported moderate/very much trust in the care provided. Compared with children who received end-of-life medical information before their loss, the risk of distrust in the care provided was higher in those who received no information (risk ratio [RR], 2.5; 95% CI, 1.5 to 4.1), in those who only received information afterward (RR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.7 to 5.9), and in those who did not know or remember if end-of-life medical information was provided (RR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.5). Those reporting distrust in the care provided had an RR of 2.3 (95% CI, 1.5 to 3.5) for depression. Furthermore, the risk of distrust in the care provided was higher among children reporting poor efforts to cure (RR, 5.1; 95% CI, 3.6 to 7.3), and/or a poor relationship with the surviving parent (RR, 2.9; 95% CI, 2.0 to 4.1).

    CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that children's trust in the care provided to a dying parent was highest when they received end-of-life medical information before their loss.

  • 3. Bylund Grenklo, Tove
    et al.
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur A
    Nyberg, Tommy
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Fürst, Carl Johan
    Self-injury in youths who lost a parent to cancer: nationwide study of the impact of family-related and health-care-related factors2014In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 23, no 9, p. 989-997Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Self-injury, a manifestation of severe psychological distress, is increased in cancer-bereaved youths. Little is known about the potential influence on the risk for self-injury of factors that could be clinically relevant to and modifiable by the health-care professionals involved in the care of the dying parent.

    METHODS: In a nationwide population-based anonymous study, 622 (73.1%) youths (aged 18-26) who, 6 to 9 years earlier at ages 13 to 16, had lost a parent to cancer answered study-specific questions about self-injury and factors related to the family and parental health care.

    RESULTS: Univariable analyses showed that the risk for self-injury was increased among cancer-bereaved youths who reported poor family cohesion the years before (relative risk [RR], 3.4, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.5-4.6) and after the loss (RR, 3.3, 95% CI, 2.4-4.4), distrust in the health care provided to the dying parent (RR, 1.7, 95% CI, 1.2-2.4), perceiving poor health-care efforts to cure the parent (RR 1.5, 95% CI, 1.1-2.1) and poor efforts to prevent suffering (RR, 1.6, 95% CI, 1.1-2.4), that at least one of their parents had been depressed or had troubles in life (RR, 1.5, CI, 1.1-2.1) and believing 3 days before the loss that the treatment would probably cure the parent (RR, 1.6, CI, 1.1-2.3). In the total multivariable models, only poor family cohesion before and after the loss remained statistically significantly associated with self-injury.

    CONCLUSION: Poor family cohesion before and after the loss of a parent to cancer is associated with an increased risk of self-injury in teenage children. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 4. Contro, Nancy
    et al.
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Reichard, Wilma J
    Sourkes, Barbara M
    Anticipatory grief and bereavement2011In: Textbook of interdisciplinary pediatric palliative care / [ed] Joanne Wolfe, Pamela S. Hinds, Barbara M. Sourkes, Philadelphia: Saunders Elsevier, 2011, 1, p. 41-54Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5. Dunberger, Gail
    et al.
    Thulin, Helena
    Waldenström, Ann-Charlotte
    Lind, Helena
    Henningsohn, Lars
    Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Cancer survivors' perception of participation in a long-term follow-up study2013In: Journal of Medical Ethics, ISSN 0306-6800, E-ISSN 1473-4257, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 41-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Every year medical researchers make contact with a large number of cancer survivors with the aim of evaluating cancer treatment. For this reason we decided to investigate how Swedish cancer survivors perceived their participation in research studies focusing on the long-term consequences of being a survivor of gynaecological or urinary bladder cancer. Data were collected by means of two study-specific postal questionnaires, both consisting of questions covering physical symptoms, well-being and the experience of being a cancer survivor. Both questionnaires also included questions evaluating the participants' experience of being research subjects. The questionnaires were developed in close co-operation with cancer survivors. The study population consisted of 1068 cancer survivors. Of these, 95% (n=1003) reported that they thought the study was valuable and 54% (n=559) that they had been positively affected by participating. Four per cent (n=39) expressed that they had been negatively affected by their participation in the study. The vast majority of the cancer survivors thought that participating in their particular study was valuable.

  • 6.
    Eilegård, Alexandra
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Nyberg, Tommy
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Bereaved siblings' perception of participating in research: a nationwide study2013In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 411-416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study is to examine bereaved siblings' perception of research participation. METHODS: A Swedish nationwide study on avoidable and modifiable health care-related factors in paediatric oncology among bereaved siblings who lost a brother or sister to cancer between the years 2000 and 2007 was conducted. Data are presented as proportions, and the differences between groups were statistically tested at the 5% significant level using Fisher's exact test. RESULTS: Out of 240 eligible siblings, 174 responded (73 %). None of the siblings (0/168) thought their participation would affect them negatively in the long term. However, 13% (21/168) stated it was a negative experience to fill out the questionnaire, whereas 84% (142/169) found it to be a positive experience. Women were more likely to report their participation as positive in a long-term perspective compared with men (p = 0.018). CONCLUSIONS: None of the bereaved siblings in this Swedish nationwide study anticipated any long-term negative effect from their research participation. A majority reported it as positive to revisit their needs and experiences throughout their brother or sister's illness and death 2-9 years following the loss. We believe that the stepwise approach used in this study contributed to the high acceptance. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 7.
    Eilegård, Alexandra
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Nyberg, Tommy
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Psychological health in siblings who lost a brother or sister to cancer 2 to 9 years earlier2013In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 683-691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to assess long-term psychological distress in siblings who lost a brother or sister to cancer 2 to 9 years earlier, as compared with a control group of non-bereaved siblings from the general population. METHODS: During 2009, we conducted a nationwide follow-up study in Sweden by using an anonymous study-specific questionnaire. Siblings who had lost a brother or sister to cancer between the years 2000 and 2007 and also a control group of non-bereaved siblings from the general population were invited to participate. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was used to measure psychological distress, and to test for differences in the ordinal outcome responses between the groups, we used Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney rank-sum test. RESULTS: Among the bereaved siblings, 174/240 (73%) participated and 219/293 (75%) among the non-bereaved. Self-assessed low self-esteem (p = 0.002), difficulties falling asleep (p = 0.005), and low level of personal maturity (p = 0.007) at follow-up were more prevalent among bereaved siblings. However, anxiety (p = 0.298) and depression (p = 0.946), according to HADS, were similar. CONCLUSION: Bereaved siblings are at increased risk of low self-esteem, low level of personal maturity and difficulties falling asleep as compared with non-bereaved peers. Yet, the bereaved were not more likely to report anxiety or depression. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 8. Eilertsen, Mary-Elizabeth Bradley
    et al.
    Eilegård, Alexandra
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Nyberg, Tommy
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Impact of social support on bereaved siblings' anxiety: a nationwide follow-up2013In: Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1043-4542, E-ISSN 1532-8457, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 301-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:To assess adolescent and young adult siblings' perception of social support prior to and following the loss of their brother or sister to cancer, 2 to 9 years earlier, and their anxiety at follow-up. Method: In 2009, 174 (73%) bereaved siblings (12-25 years) participated in a nationwide, long-term follow-up study in Sweden using an anonymous study-specific questionnaire. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used to measure self-assessed anxiety. Results: Siblings had a higher risk of anxiety if they perceived their need for social support was unsatisfied during their brother or sisters' last month before death, relative risk (RR) = 3.6 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.8-7.3); time after death, RR = 2.9 (95% CI = 1.5-5.6); and at follow-up, RR = 3.8 (95% CI = 2.0-7.2). Furthermore, a higher risk for anxiety was shown for siblings if they did not perceive that their parents and neighbors cared for them after their brother or sisters' death, RR = 2.7 (95% CI = 1.3-5.5), RR = 5.4 (95% CI = 1.3-21.9), respectively. Conclusion: Bereaved siblings had a greater probability to report self-assessed anxiety if they perceived that their need for social support was not satisfied prior to and following death. Information from both nurses and other health care professionals to families about the impact of social support may contribute to lessen the siblings' risk of anxiety.

  • 9. El Malla, Hanan
    et al.
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Wilderäng, Ulrica
    El Sayed Elborai, Yasser
    Ylitalo, Nathalie
    Parental trust in health care: a prospective study from the Children's Cancer Hospital in Egypt2013In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 548-554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Patient-physician communication and patient satisfaction are important elements of cancer care. Trust is considered to be crucial for the patient-physician relationship, yet little is to be found in the literature regarding what factors may influence trust. METHODS: We assessed predictors of trust in health-care professionals and in the medical care by administering two questionnaires, one at start of chemotherapy treatment and one at the time of the third chemotherapy cycle, to 304 parents of children with newly diagnosed cancer at the Children's Cancer Hospital in Cairo, Egypt. RESULTS: Parents' trust in the medical care at the time of the child's third chemotherapy cycle was significantly associated with the following at the start of treatment: having received at least moderate information about the disease (relative risk (RR) 13.2; 95% CI 7.8-22.3) and the treatment (RR 17.2; 95% CI 9.5-31.4), having the opportunity to communicate with the child's physicians (RR 21.3; 95% CI 11.7-38.8), being satisfied with the physicians conversation style (RR 30.6; 95% CI 14.4-64.9), having the emotional needs met (RR 22.2; 95% CI 11.8-41.9), and being met with care by the child's physicians (RR 32.0; 95% CI 15.2-67.7). After multivariable model selection, the strongest predictor of trust at the time of the third chemotherapy cycle was to be met with care at the start of treatment. CONCLUSION: Parents being met with care by the child's physicians at the beginning of the child's chemotherapy treatment develop an increased trust in the medical care. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 10. El Malla, Hanan
    et al.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Ylitalo Helm, Nathalie
    Wilderäng, Ulrika
    El Sayed Elborai, Yasser
    Elshami, M
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Cancer disclosure-account from a pediatric oncology ward in Egypt2017In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, ISSN 1057-9249, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 679-685Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Informing the child about his/her diagnosis and treatment plan is essential; research has shown that it is related to the patient's quality of life and adherence to medication.

    METHODS: For 7 months during 2008 (February to September), 2 study-specific questionnaires were constructed and administered to 304 parents of children diagnosed with cancer at the Children's Cancer Hospital Egypt.

    RESULTS: Among the 313 eligible parents of children diagnosed with cancer, 304 (97%) answered the first questionnaire and 281 (92%) answered the second questionnaire. We found that nearly three-quarters (72%) of the parents had their child's cancer diagnosis communicated by the physician. Among the 72%, the rate of the children present with the parent or parents during the disease disclosure conversation was 39% (n = 85/219). The majority of the children were in the age group 5-18 years (55%).

    CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that cancer disclosure at the Children's Cancer Hospital is to a certain degree common; yet even when disclosure does take place, it is mainly in the absence of the child. Moreover, the information provided during the conversation may not be fully comprehended by the parent or the child because of the physician's misleading use of terms when disclosing the disease. Therefore, better practice should be developed for disease disclosure, and proper communication should be established between the patients and the provider; patient autonomy should also have an influence in the clinical practice.

  • 11. El Malla, Hanan
    et al.
    Ylitalo Helm, Nathalie
    Wilderäng, Ulrica
    El Sayed Elborai, Yasser
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Adherence to medication: A nation-wide study from the Children's Cancer Hospital, Egypt2013In: World journal of psychiatry, ISSN 2220-3206, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 25-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To investigate adherence to medical regimen and predictors for non-adherence among children with cancer in Egypt.

    METHODS: We administered two study specific questionnaires to 304 parents of children diagnosed with cancer at the Children's Cancer Hospital in Cairo, Egypt, one before the first chemotherapy treatment and the other before the third. The questionnaires were translated to colloquial Egyptian Arabic, and due, to the high illiteracy level in Egypt an interviewer read the questions in Arabic to each parent and registered the answers. Both questionnaires consisted of almost 90 questions each. In addition, a Case Report Form was filled in from the child's medical journal. The study period consisted of 7 mo (February until September 2008) and we had a participation rate of 97%. Descriptive statistics are presented and Fisher's exact test was used to check for possible differences between the adherent and non-adherent groups. A P-value below 0.05 was considered significant. Software used was SAS version 9.3 for Windows (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC, United States).

    RESULTS: Two hundred and eighty-one (90%) parents answered the second questionnaire, regarding their child's adherence behaviour. Approximately two thirds of the children admitted to their third chemotherapy treatment had received medical recommendations upon discharge from the first or second chemotherapy treatment (181/281, 64%). Sixty-eight percent (123/181) of the parents who were given medical recommendations reported that their child did not follow the recommendations. Two main predictors were found for non-adherence: child resistance (111/123, 90%) and inadequate information (100/123, 81%). In the adherent group, 20% of the parents (n = 12/58) reported trust in their child's doctor while 14 percent 8/58 reported trust in the other health-care professionals. Corresponding numbers for the non-adherent group are 8/123 (7%) for both their child's doctor and other health-care professionals. Almost all of the parents expressed a lack of optimism towards the treatment (116/121, 96%), yet they reported an intention to continue with the treatment for two main reasons, for the sake of their child's life (70%) (P = 0.005) and worry that their child would die if they discontinued the treatment (81%) (P < 0.0001).

    CONCLUSION: Non-adherence to medical regimen is common among children diagnosed with cancer in Egypt, the main reasons being child resistance and inadequate information.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Kreicbergs_140307
  • 12. Hagedoorn, Mariët
    et al.
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Appel, Charlotte
    Coping with cancer: The perspective of patients' relatives2011In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 205-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Future studies that focus on the interactions between patients and family members - parents, children and partners - are of great importance to further the field by providing more insight into the family dynamics of dealing with cancer. Such insights will offer tools for (refining) interventions for families in need.

  • 13. Jalmsell, L
    et al.
    Onelöv, E
    Steineck, G
    Henter, J-I
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with cancer and the risk of long-term psychological morbidity in the bereaved parents2011In: Bone Marrow Transplantation, ISSN 0268-3369, E-ISSN 1476-5365, Vol. 46, no 8, p. 1063-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have investigated whether hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) before the death of children with cancer has a long-term effect on the physical and psychological well-being of the parents. A nationwide questionnaire was sent out to all bereaved parents in Sweden who had lost a child due to a malignancy from 1992 to 1997. Self-reported levels of anxiety, depression and quality of life as well as overall psychological and physical well-being in bereaved parents of children who underwent HSCT were compared with bereaved parents whose children did not receive a transplant. Bereaved parents whose children underwent HSCT had, according to a visual digital scale, an increased relative risk (RR) of long-term anxiety (RR 1.5; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-2.1), poor psychological well-being (RR1.3; 95% CI 1.1-1.5), low quality of life (RR 1.4; 95% CI 1.2-1.7) and poor physical health (RR 1.3; 95% CI 1.1-1.5), whereas the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and 'The Göteborg Quality of Life Instrument' were non-significantly increased (RR 1.3; 95% CI 0.8-2.3 and RR 1.7; 95% CI 0.9-3.3, respectively). The risks of these consequences were further augmented in case of multiple HSCT. We suggest that bereaved parents of children undergoing HSCT may be at greater risk of decreased psychological well-being than other bereaved parents of children with cancer.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 22 November 2010; doi:10.1038/bmt.2010.287.

  • 14. Jalmsell, Li
    et al.
    Forslund, Martin
    Hansson, Mats G
    Henter, Jan-Inge
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Frost, Britt-Marie
    Transition to noncurative end-of-life care in paediatric oncology--a nationwide follow-up in Sweden2013In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 102, no 7, p. 744-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To estimate whether and when children dying from a malignancy are recognized as being beyond cure and to study patterns of care the last weeks of life.

    METHODS: A nationwide retrospective medical record review was conducted. Medical records of 95 children (60% of eligible children) who died from a malignancy 2007-2009 in Sweden were studied.

    RESULTS: Eighty-three children (87%) were treated without curative intent at the time of death. Children with haematological malignancies were less likely to be recognized as being beyond cure than children with brain tumours [relative risks (RR) 0.7; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.6-0.9] or solid tumours (RR 0.8; 0.6-1.0). The transition to noncurative care varied from the last day of life to over four years prior to death (median 60 days). Children with haematological malignancies were treated with a curative intent closer to death and were also given chemotherapy (RR 5.5; 1.3-22.9), transfusions (RR 2.0; 1.0-4.0) and antibiotics (RR 5.3; 1.8-15.5) more frequently than children with brain tumours the last weeks of life.

    CONCLUSION: The majority of children dying from a malignancy were treated with noncurative intent at the time of death. The timing of a transition in care varied with the diagnoses, being closer to death in children with haematological malignancies.

  • 15. Jalmsell, Li
    et al.
    Kontio, Taru
    Stein, Maria
    Henter, Jan-Inge
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Sophiahemmet University.
    On the child's own initiative: parents communicate with their dying child about death2015In: Death Studies, ISSN 0748-1187, E-ISSN 1091-7683, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 111-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Open and honest communication has been identified as an important factor in providing good palliative care. However, there is no easy solution to if, when and how parents and a dying child should communicate about death. This paper reports how bereaved parents communicated about death with their child, dying from a malignancy. Communication was often initiated by the child and included communication through narratives such as fairy-tales and movies and talking more directly about death itself. Parents also reported that their child prepared for death by giving instructions about his or her grave or funeral and giving away toys.

  • 16.
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Sophiahemmet University.
    När barn får livshotande sjukdom - föräldrars perspektiv2013In: Palliativ vård: begrepp & perspektiv i teori och praktik / [ed] Birgitta Andershed, Britt-Marie Ternestedt, Cecilia Håkanson, Lund, 2013, 1, p. 321-328Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Hagen Budny, Michaela
    Samtal med barn och deras familjer om döden2014In: Kommunikation med barn och unga i vården / [ed] Maja Söderbäck, Stockholm: Liber, 2014, 1, p. 168-178Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18. Omerov, Pernilla
    et al.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Runeson, Bo
    Christensson, Anna
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Pettersén, Rossana
    Rubenson, Birgitta
    Skoogh, Johanna
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Nyberg, Ullakarin
    Preparatory studies to a population-based survey of suicide-bereaved parents in Sweden2013In: Crisis, ISSN 0227-5910, E-ISSN 2151-2396, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 200-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There is a need for evidence-based guidelines on how professionals should act following a suicide. In an effort to provide empiric knowledge, we designed a nationwide population-based study including suicide-bereaved parents.

    AIM: To describe the process from creating hypotheses through interviews to the development of a population-based questionnaire.

    METHOD: We used interviews, qualitative analysis and various means of validation to create a study-specific questionnaire to be used in a nonselected nationwide population of suicide-bereaved parents and a control population of nonbereaved (N = 2:1). The Swedish Register of Causes of Death and the Multigeneration Register were used to identify eligible individuals. All presumptive participants received a letter of invitation followed by a personal contact.

    RESULTS: We developed a questionnaire covering the participants' perception of participation, their daily living, psychological morbidity, professional actions, and other experiences in immediate connection to the time before and after the suicide. Almost three out of four parents (bereaved = 666, nonbereaved = 377) responded to the questionnaire.

    CONCLUSIONS: By involving parents early in the research process we were able to create a questionnaire that generated a high participation rate in a nationwide population-based study that might help us to answer our hypotheses about bereavement after suicide.

  • 19. Rosenberg, Abby R
    et al.
    Postier, Andrea
    Osenga, Kaci
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Neville, Bridget
    Dussel, Veronica
    Wolfe, Joanne
    Long-term psychosocial outcomes among bereaved siblings of children with cancer2015In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, ISSN 0885-3924, E-ISSN 1873-6513, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 55-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT.: The death of a child from cancer affects the entire family. Little is known about the long-term psychosocial outcomes of bereaved siblings.

    OBJECTIVES: To describe: 1) the prevalence of risky health behaviors, psychological distress, and social support among bereaved siblings; and 2) potentially modifiable factors associated with poor outcomes.

    METHODS: Bereaved siblings were eligible for this dual-center, cross-sectional, survey-based study if they were 16 years old or older and their parents had enrolled in one of three prior studies about caring for children with cancer at the end of life. Linear regression models identified associations between personal perspectives before, during, and after the family's cancer experience and outcomes (health behaviors, psychological distress, and social support).

    RESULTS: Fifty-eight siblings completed surveys (62% response rate). They were approximately 12 years bereaved, with a mean age of 26 years at the time of the survey (SD=7.8). Anxiety, depression, and illicit substance use increased during the year following their brother/sister's death, but then returned to baseline. Siblings who reported dissatisfaction with communication, poor preparation for death, missed opportunities to say "goodbye," and/or a perceived negative impact of the cancer experience on relationships tended to have higher distress and lower social support scores (P<0.001-0.031). Almost all siblings reported their loss still affected them; half stated the experience impacted current educational and career goals.

    CONCLUSION: How siblings experience the death of a child with cancer may impact their long-term psychosocial well-being. Sibling-directed communication and concurrent supportive care during the cancer experience and the year following sibling death may mitigate poor long-term outcomes.

  • 20. Sveen, Josefin
    et al.
    Eilegård, Alexandra
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Sophiahemmet University.
    They still grieve: a nationwide follow-up of young adults 2-9 years after losing a sibling to cancer2014In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 658-664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of unresolved grief in bereaved young adult siblings and examine possible contributing factors.

    METHODS: The study was a Swedish population-based study of young adults who had lost a brother or sister to cancer, 2-9 years earlier. Of 240 eligible siblings, 174 (73%) completed a study-specific questionnaire. This study focused on whether the respondents had worked through their grief over the sibling's death and to what extent.

    RESULTS: A majority (54%) of siblings stated that they had worked through their grief either 'not at all' or 'to some extent' at the time of investigation. In multiple regression analyses with unresolved grief as the dependent variable, 21% of the variance was explained by lack of social support and shorter time since loss.

    CONCLUSION: The majority of bereaved young adults had not worked through their grief over the sibling's death. A small group of siblings reported that they had not worked through their grief at all, which may be an indicator of prolonged grief. Lack of social support and more recent loss were associated with not having worked through the grief over the sibling's death. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf