shh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Akselsson, Anna
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Georgsson, Susanne
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Lindgren, H
    Pettersson, K
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Women's attitudes, experiences and compliance concerning the use of Mindfetalness: A method for systematic observation of fetal movements in late pregnancy2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Akselsson, Anna
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Georgsson, Susanne
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Pettersson, Karin
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Women's attitudes, experiences and compliance concerning the use of Mindfetalness- a method for systematic observation of fetal movements in late pregnancy2017In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Maternal perception of decreased fetal movements and low awareness of fetal movements are associated with a negative birth outcome. Mindfetalness is a method developed for women to facilitate systematic observations of the intensity, character and frequency of fetal movements in late pregnancy. We sought to explore women's attitudes, experiences and compliance in using Mindfetalness.

    METHODS: We enrolled 104 pregnant women treated at three maternity clinics in Stockholm, Sweden, from February to July of 2016. We educated 104 women in gestational week 28-32 by providing information about fetal movements and how to practice Mindfetalness. Each was instructed to perform the assessment daily for 15 min. At each subsequent follow-up, the midwife collected information regarding their perceptions of Mindfetalness, and their compliance. Content analyses, descriptive and analytic statistics were used in the analysis of data.

    RESULTS: Of the women, 93 (89%) were positive towards Mindfetalness and compliance was high 78 (75%). Subjective responses could be binned into one of five categories: Decreased worry, relaxing, creating a relationship, more knowledge about the unborn baby and awareness of the unborn baby. Eleven (11%) women had negative perceptions of Mindfetalness, citing time, and the lack of need for a method to observe fetal movements as the most common reasons.

    CONCLUSION: Women in late pregnancy are generally positive about Mindfetalness and their compliance with daily use is high. The technique helped them to be more aware of, and create a relationship with, their unborn baby. Mindfetalness can be a useful tool in antenatal care. However, further study is necessary in order to determine whether the technique is able to reduce the incidence of negative birth outcome.

  • 3.
    Akselsson, Anna
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Linde, Anders
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Georgsson, Susanne
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Lindgren, H
    Pettersson, K
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Structured daily observation of fetal movements and transfer to neonatal clinic2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Akselsson, Anna
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Georgsson, Susanne
    Pettersson, Karin
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Increased labor induction and women presenting with decreased or altered fetal movements: A population-based survey2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 5, article id e0216216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Women's awareness of fetal movements is important as perception of decreased fetal movements can be a sign of a compromised fetus. We aimed to study rate of labor induction in relation to number of times women seek care due to decreased or altered fetal movements during their pregnancy compared to women not seeking such care. Further, we investigated the indication of induction.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: A prospective population-based cohort study including all obstetric clinics in Stockholm, Sweden. Questionnaires were distributed to women who sought care due to decreased or altered fetal movements ≥ 28 week's gestation in 2014, women for whom an examination did not indicate a compromised fetus that required induction of labor or cesarean section when they sought care. Women who gave birth at ≥ 28 weeks' gestation in 2014 in Stockholm comprises the reference group.

    RESULTS: Labor was induced more often among the 2683 women who had sought care due to decreased or altered fetal movements (RR 1.4, 95% CI 1.3-1.5). In women who presented with decreased or altered fetal movements induction of labor occurred more frequently for fetal indication than those with induction of labor and no prior fetal movement presentation (RR 1.6, 95% CI 1.4-1.8). The rate of induction increased with number of times a woman sought care, RR 1.3 for single presentation to 3.2 for five or more.

    CONCLUSIONS: We studied women seeking care for decreased or altered fetal movements and for whom pregnancy was not terminated with induction or caesarean section. Subsequent (median 20 days), induction of labor and induction for fetal indications were more frequent in this group compared to the group of women with no fetal movement presentations. Among women seeking care for altered or decreased fetal movements, the likelihood of induction of labor increased with frequency of presentation.

  • 5.
    Akselsson, Anna
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Georgsson, Susanne
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Pettersson, Karin
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Mindfetalness - a systematic method for observing fetal movements: A randomized controlled trial2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Akselsson, Anna
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Georgsson, Susanne
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Pettersson, Karin
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Mindfetalness: A useful tool when informing pregnant women about fetal movements2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Akselsson, Anna
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Georgsson, Susanne
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Pettersson, Karin
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Mindfetalness: En metod som kan stärka kvinnors uppmärksamhet av fosterrörelser2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Akselsson, Anna
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Georgsson, Susanne
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Warland, Jane
    Pettersson, Karin
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Daily structured approach to awareness of fetal movements and pregnancy outcome - a prospective study2019In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 20, p. 32-37, article id S1877-5756(18)30321-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: We investigated how women, seeking care due to decreased movements, had paid attention to fetal movements and if the method of monitoring was associated with pregnancy outcome.

    METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed to women from gestational week 28, who had sought care due to decreased fetal movements in Stockholm between January 1st and December 31st, 2014. Women were included in the study if the examination did not reveal any signs of a compromised fetus requiring immediate intervention. Birth outcome and sociodemographic data were collected from the obstetric record register.

    RESULTS: There were 29166 births in Stockholm in 2014, we have information from 2683 women who sought care for decreased fetal movements. The majority (96.6%) of the women stated that they paid attention to fetal movements. Some women observed fetal movements weekly (17.2%) and 69.5% concentrated on fetal movements daily (non-structured group). One in ten (9.9%) used counting methods daily for observing fetal movements (structured group). Women in the structured group more often had caesarean section before onset of labor (RR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2-2.2) and a lower risk of their baby being transferred to neonatal nursery (RR 0.25, 95% CI 0.03-0.94) compared to women in the non-structured group.

    CONCLUSIONS: Women, who had a daily and structured approach to awareness of fetal movements, were more likely to have a caesarean section but their babies were less likely to be transferred to a neonatal nursery as compared with women who used a non-structured method daily.

  • 9.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Akselsson, Anna
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Georgsson, Susanne
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Lindgren, H
    Pettersson, K
    Steineck, G
    Rationale, study protocol and the cluster randomization process in a controlled trial including 40,000 women investigating the effects of mindfetalness.2016In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 10, p. 56-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Shortening pre-hospital delay may decrease stillbirth rates and rates of babies born with a compromised health. Stillbirth may be preceded by a decrease in fetal movements. Mindfetalness has been developed as a response to the shortcomings of kick-counting for the monitoring of fetal movements by the pregnant woman. We do not know if practicing Mindfetalness may diminish pre-hospital delay. Nor do we know if practicing Mindfetalness may increase or decrease the percentage of women seeking health care for unfounded, from a medical perspective, worry for her fetus' well-being.

    METHODS:

    This article describes the rationale, study protocol and the randomization process for a planned study randomly allocating 40,000 pregnant women to receive, or not receive, proactive information about practicing Mindfetalness. The unit of randomization is 63 antenatal clinics in the Stockholm area. Midwives in the antenatal clinics randomized to Mindfetalness will verbally inform about practicing Mindfetalness, hand out brochures (printed in seven languages) and inform about a website giving information about Mindfetalness. Routine care will continue in the control clinics. All information for the analyses, including the main endpoint of an Apgar score below 7 (e.g., 0-6 with stillbirth giving a score of 0), measured five minutes after birth, will be retrieved from population-based registers.

    RESULTS:

    We have randomized 33 antenatal clinics to Mindfetalness and 30 to routine care. In two clinics a pilot study has been performed. One of the clinics randomly allocated to inform about Mindfetalness will not do so (but will be included in the intention-to-treat analysis). In October 2016 we started to recruit women for the main study.

    CONCLUSION:

    The work up to now follows the outlined time schedule. We expect to present the first results concerning the effects of Mindfetalness during 2018.

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
v. 2.35.7
|