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  • 1. Lehto, Elviira
    et al.
    Ray, Carola
    Haukkala, Ari
    Yngve, Agneta
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Thorsdottir, Inga
    Roos, Eva
    Predicting gender differences in liking for vegetables and preference for a variety of vegetables among 11-year-old children2015In: Appetite, ISSN 0195-6663, E-ISSN 1095-8304, Vol. 95, p. 285-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the factors that predict liking for vegetables and preference for a variety of vegetables among schoolchildren. Additionally, we examined if there were gender differences in the predictors that explain the hypothesized higher scores in liking vegetables and preferences among girls. The data from the PRO GREENS project included 424 Finnish children (response rate 77%) aged 11 to 12. The children completed validated measures about social and environmental factors related to their liking for vegetables and preferences both at baseline 2009 and follow-up 2010. The associations were examined with regression and mediation analyses. The strongest predictors of both girls' and boys' liking and preferences were higher levels of eating vegetables together with the family, previous vegetable intake and a lower level of perceived barriers. Liking was additionally predicted by a lower level of parental demand that their child should eat vegetables. Girls reported higher levels of liking and preferences in the follow-up. This gender difference was mainly explained by girls' lower level of perceived barriers related to vegetable intake and girls' higher previous vegetable intake. Interventions that aim to increase the low vegetable intake among boys by increasing their liking for vegetables and preference for a variety of vegetables could benefit from targeting perceived barriers, namely boys' perception and values concerning the consumption of vegetables.

  • 2. Nilsen, Bente B
    et al.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Sjöberg, Agneta
    Moraeus, Lotta
    Lissner, Lauren
    Werner, Bo
    Using different growth references to measure thinness and overweight among Swedish primary school children showed considerable variations2016In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 105, no 10, p. 1158-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The study compared how four different growth references determined the prevalence of thinness and overweight, based on height and weight measurements from a nationally representative sample of Swedish children from seven to nine years of age.

    METHODS: The height and weight measurements of 4,518 Swedish schoolchildren aged seven to nine years were carried out in 2008 using a standardised protocol. The prevalence of different degrees of thinness and overweight were calculated using international growth references from the World Health Organization, the International Obesity Task Force and two Swedish growth references from Werner and Karlberg.

    RESULTS: Depending on which growth reference we used, the prevalence of different degrees of thinness varied from 7.5%-16.9% for the boys and 6.9%-13.7% for the girls, while for the prevalence of overweight, including obesity and severe obesity, varied from 16.5%-25.7% for the boys and 18.2-25.2% for the girls. There were also significant gender differences depending on the growth reference we used.

    CONCLUSION: Using four different growth references, two international and two Swedish, produced wide variations in the prevalence of thinness and overweight, together with significant gender differences. In the absence of a global definition, we need both national and international growth references. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Rossen, Jenny
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Buman, Matthew P
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Ainsworth, Barbara
    Brismar, Kerstin
    Hagströmer, Maria
    Reallocating bouted sedentary time to non-bouted sedentary time, light activity and moderate-vigorous physical activity in adults with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 7, article id e0181053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the potential associations of reallocating 30 minutes sedentary time in long bouts (>60 min) to sedentary time in non-bouts, light intensity physical activity (LPA) and moderate- to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) with cardiometabolic risk factors in a population diagnosed with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes.

    METHODS: Participants diagnosed with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes (n = 124, 50% men, mean [SD] age = 63.8 [7.5] years) were recruited to the physical activity intervention Sophia Step Study. For this study baseline data was used with a cross-sectional design. Time spent in sedentary behaviors in bouts (>60 min) and non-bouts (accrued in <60 min bouts) and physical activity was measured using the ActiGraph GT1M. Associations of reallocating bouted sedentary time to non-bouted sedentary time, LPA and MVPA with cardiometabolic risk factors were examined using an isotemporal substitution framework with linear regression models.

    RESULTS: Reallocating 30 minutes sedentary time in bouts to MVPA was associated with lower waist circumference (b = -4.30 95% CI:-7.23, -1.38 cm), lower BMI (b = -1.46 95% CI:-2.60, -0.33 kg/m2) and higher HDL cholesterol levels (b = 0.11 95% CI: 0.02, 0.21 kg/m2. Similar associations were seen for reallocation of sedentary time in non-bouts to MVPA. Reallocating sedentary time in bouts to LPA was associated only with lower waist circumference.

    CONCLUSION: Reallocation of sedentary time in bouts as well as non-bouts to MVPA, but not to LPA, was beneficially associated with waist circumference, BMI and HDL cholesterol in individuals with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. The results of this study confirm the importance of reallocation sedentary time to MVPA.

  • 4.
    Rossen, Jenny
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Hagströmer, Maria
    Yngve, Agneta
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Sophia Step Study: en metod för att öka patienternas fysiska aktivitetsnivå2016In: BestPractice Diabets/Hjärt-kärlsjukdomar, Vol. 6, no 19, p. 16-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Rossen, Jenny
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Lööf, Helena
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Hagströmer, Maria
    Brismar, Kerstin
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Using pedometers for self-management of physical activity: Participants' experiences from Sophia Step Study: A physical activity promotion intervention in pre- and type 2 diabetes2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Rossen, Jenny
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Hagströmer, M
    Brismar, Kerstin
    Ainsworth, B
    Möller, P
    Iskull, C
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Sophia step study: An RCT using pedometers to increase daily steps in subjects with pre and type 2 diabetes2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Rossen, Jenny
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Hagströmer, Maria
    Brismar, Kerstin
    Ainsworth, Barbara E
    Iskull, Christina
    Möller, Peter
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Physical activity promotion in the primary care setting in pre- and type 2 diabetes - the Sophia step study, an RCT2015In: BMC public health, ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 15, p. 647-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Physical activity prevents or delays progression of impaired glucose tolerance in high-risk individuals. Physical activity promotion should serve as a basis in diabetes care. It is necessary to develop and evaluate health-promoting methods that are feasible as well as cost-effective within diabetes care. The aim of Sophia Step Study is to evaluate the impact of a multi-component and a single component physical activity intervention aiming at improving HbA1c (primary outcome) and other metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors, physical activity levels and overall health in patients with pre- and type 2 diabetes.

    METHODS/DESIGN: Sophia Step Study is a randomized controlled trial and participants are randomly assigned to either a multi-component intervention group (A), a pedometer group (B) or a control group (C). In total, 310 patients will be included and followed for 24 months. Group A participants are offered pedometers and a website to register steps, physical activity on prescription with yearly follow-ups, motivational interviewing (10 occasions) and group consultations (including walks, 12 occasions). Group B participants are offered pedometers and a website to register steps. Group C are offered usual care. The theoretical framework underpinning the interventions is the Health Belief Model, the Stages of Change Model, and the Social Cognitive Theory. Both the multi-component intervention (group A) and the pedometer intervention (group B) are using several techniques for behavior change such as self-monitoring, goal setting, feedback and relapse prevention. Measurements are made at week 0, 8, 12, 16, month 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24, including metabolic and cardiovascular biomarkers (HbA1c as primary health outcome), accelerometry and daily steps. Furthermore, questionnaires were used to evaluate dietary intake, physical activity, perceived ability to perform physical activity, perceived support for being active, quality of life, anxiety, depression, well-being, perceived treatment, perceived stress and diabetes self- efficacy.

    DISCUSSION: This study will show if a multi-component intervention using pedometers with group- and individual consultations is more effective than a single- component intervention using pedometers alone, in increasing physical activity and improving HbA1c, other metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors, physical activity levels and overall health in patients with pre- and type 2 diabetes.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02374788 . Registered 28 January 2015.

  • 8. Walker, Jenelle R
    et al.
    Soroush, Ali
    Ainsworth, Barbara E
    Belyea, Michael
    Swan, Pamela D
    Yngve, Agneta
    Sophiahemmet University.
    U.S. Cohort Differences in Body Composition Outcomes of a 6-Month Pedometer-Based Physical Activity Intervention: The ASUKI Step Study2014In: Asian journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 2008-000X, E-ISSN 2008-7209, Vol. 5, no 4, p. e25748-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Regular physical activity (PA) enhances health and is an important factor in disease prevention and longevity. The 2008 U.S. Physical Activity Guidelines recommends that all healthy adults attain at least 150 minutes per week of moderate intensity aerobic PA (e.g., brisk walking) to maintain and promote PA.

    OBJECTIVES: This study determined the effects of a 6-month pedometer-based worksite walking intervention with participants focusing on a goal of achieving 10,000 steps per day, on body composition in adults with a wide range of body mass index (BMI) values and compares the changes with outcomes of similar studies.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: The design was a single group, quasi-experimental study. All participants received a pedometer and were asked to register the daily number of steps. Men and women (n = 142; age = 41 ± 11.5 years; BMI = 27.2 ± 7.25 kg.m(-2)) received body composition measures at 1, 3, and 6 months. A multilevel growth modeling approach was used to explore change over time and to predict change by steps, age, gender, and fat category categorized as normal and overweight/obese.

    RESULTS: Significant individual differences in linear slopes and change over time were observed for waist circumference (WC) (-3.0 cm) only in unconditional model (t = -0.67, P = 0.02).

    CONCLUSIONS: A 3.0 cm loss in WC shows that a 10,000 step per day walking program has the potential to influence changes in body composition measures that are correlated with adverse health outcomes. While significant changes did occur there are some limitations. The analysis did not consider the data regarding completing of 10,000 steps per day and other potential factors that could influence the results. Compliance to the walking dose and initial physical activity and body composition levels are important to consider when studying body composition changes in such programs.

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  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
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