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  • 1.
    Akselsson, Anna
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Georgsson, Susanne
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Pettersson, Karin
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Women's attitudes, experiences and compliance concerning the use of Mindfetalness- a method for systematic observation of fetal movements in late pregnancy2017In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Maternal perception of decreased fetal movements and low awareness of fetal movements are associated with a negative birth outcome. Mindfetalness is a method developed for women to facilitate systematic observations of the intensity, character and frequency of fetal movements in late pregnancy. We sought to explore women's attitudes, experiences and compliance in using Mindfetalness.

    METHODS: We enrolled 104 pregnant women treated at three maternity clinics in Stockholm, Sweden, from February to July of 2016. We educated 104 women in gestational week 28-32 by providing information about fetal movements and how to practice Mindfetalness. Each was instructed to perform the assessment daily for 15 min. At each subsequent follow-up, the midwife collected information regarding their perceptions of Mindfetalness, and their compliance. Content analyses, descriptive and analytic statistics were used in the analysis of data.

    RESULTS: Of the women, 93 (89%) were positive towards Mindfetalness and compliance was high 78 (75%). Subjective responses could be binned into one of five categories: Decreased worry, relaxing, creating a relationship, more knowledge about the unborn baby and awareness of the unborn baby. Eleven (11%) women had negative perceptions of Mindfetalness, citing time, and the lack of need for a method to observe fetal movements as the most common reasons.

    CONCLUSION: Women in late pregnancy are generally positive about Mindfetalness and their compliance with daily use is high. The technique helped them to be more aware of, and create a relationship with, their unborn baby. Mindfetalness can be a useful tool in antenatal care. However, further study is necessary in order to determine whether the technique is able to reduce the incidence of negative birth outcome.

  • 2.
    Carlsson, Tommy
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Balbas, Banaz
    Mattsson, Elisabet
    Written narratives from immigrants following a prenatal diagnosis: qualitative exploratory study2019In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Expectant parents often have optimistic expectations of the obstetric ultrasound examination and are unprepared for a diagnosis of foetal anomaly. Research that gives voice to the experiences of immigrants faced with a prenatal diagnosis is scarce, and there is a need for more exploratory research that provides insights into the experiences of these persons. The aim of this study was to explore narratives of experiences of immigrants with Arabic or Sorani interpreter needs when presented with a prenatal diagnosis of foetal anomaly.

    METHODS: A web-based tool with open-ended questions was distributed via Arabic and Kurdish non-profit associations and general women's associations in Sweden. Responses were received from six women and analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: The analysis resulted in three themes: (1) an unexpected hurricane of emotions, (2) trying to understand the situation though information in an unfamiliar language, and (3) being cared for in a country with accessible obstetric care and where induced abortion is legal.

    CONCLUSIONS: Immigrant women described an unexpected personal tragedy when faced with a prenatal diagnosis of foetal anomaly, and emphasised the importance of respectful and empathic psychological support. Their experiences of insufficient and incomprehensible information call attention to the importance of tailored approaches and the use of adequate medical interpreting services. There is a need for more descriptive studies that investigate decision-making and preparedness for induced abortion among immigrants faced with a prenatal diagnosis.

  • 3. Gravensteen, Ida Kathrine
    et al.
    Jacobsen, Eva-Marie
    Sandset, Per Morten
    Helgadottir, Linda Bjørk
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Sandvik, Leiv
    Ekeberg, Øivind
    Anxiety, depression and relationship satisfaction in the pregnancy following stillbirth and after the birth of a live-born baby: a prospective study2018In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Experiencing a stillbirth can be a potent stressor for psychological distress in the subsequent pregnancy and possibly after the subsequent birth. The impact on women's relationship with her partner in the subsequent pregnancy and postpartum remains uncertain. The objectives of the study were 1) To investigate the prevalence of anxiety and depression in the pregnancy following stillbirth and assess gestational age at stillbirth and inter-pregnancy interval as individual risk factors. 2) To assess the course of anxiety, depression and satisfaction with partner relationship up to 3 years after the birth of a live-born baby following stillbirth.

    METHODS: This study is based on data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, a population-based pregnancy cohort. The sample included 901 pregnant women: 174 pregnant after a stillbirth, 362 pregnant after a live birth and 365 previously nulliparous. Anxiety and depression were assessed by short-form subscales of the Hopkins Symptoms Checklist, and relationship satisfaction was assessed by the Relationship Satisfaction Scale. These outcomes were measured in the third trimester of pregnancy and 6, 18 and 36 months postpartum. Logistic regression models were applied to study the impact of previous stillbirth on depression and anxiety in the third trimester of the subsequent pregnancy and to investigate gestational age and inter-pregnancy interval as potential risk factors.

    RESULTS: Women pregnant after stillbirth had a higher prevalence of anxiety (22.5%) and depression (19.7%) compared with women with a previous live birth (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 5.47, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.90-10.32 and aOR 1.91, 95% CI 1.11-3.27) and previously nulliparous women (aOR 4.97, 95% CI 2.68-9.24 and aOR 1.91, 95% CI 1.08-3.36). Gestational age at stillbirth (> 30 weeks) and inter-pregnancy interval <  12 months were not associated with depression and/or anxiety. Anxiety and depression decreased six to 18 months after the birth of a live-born baby, but increased again 36 months postpartum. Relationship satisfaction did not differ between groups.

    CONCLUSION: Women who have experienced stillbirth face a significantly greater risk of anxiety and depression in the subsequent pregnancy compared with women with a previous live birth and previously nulliparous women.

  • 4. Höglund, Berit
    et al.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Hildingsson, Ingegerd
    Few women receive a specific explanation of a stillbirth - an online survey of women's perceptions and thoughts about the cause of their baby's death2019In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In Sweden, three to four out of every 1000 pregnancies end in stillbirth each year. The aim of this study was to investigate whether women who had experienced stillbirth perceived that they had received an explanation of the death and whether they believed that healthcare professionals were responsible for the death of the baby.

    METHODS: An online survey of 356 women in Sweden who had experienced a stillbirth from January 2010 to April 2014. A mixed-methods approach with qualitative content analysis was used to examine the women's responses.

    RESULTS: Nearly half of the women (48.6%) reported that they had not received any explanation as to why their babies had died. Of the women who reported that they had received an explanation, 84 (23.6%) had a specific explanation, and 99 (27.8%) had a vague explanation. In total, 73 (30.0%) of the 243 women who answered the question "Do you believe that healthcare personnel were responsible for the stillbirth?" stated Yes. The women reported that the healthcare staff had not acknowledged their intuition that the pregnancy was proceeding poorly. Furthermore, they perceived that the staff met them with nonchalance and arrogance. Additionally, the midwife had ignored or normalised the symptoms that could indicate that their pregnancy was proceeding poorly. Some women added that neglect and avoidance among the healthcare staff could have led to a lack of monitoring, which could have been crucial for the outcome of the pregnancy.

    CONCLUSIONS: Half of the women surveyed reported that they had not received an explanation of their baby's death, and more than one-fourth held healthcare professionals responsible for the death.

  • 5.
    Linde, Anders
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Georgsson, Susanne
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Pettersson, Karin
    Holmström, Sofia
    Norberg, Emma
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Fetal movement in late pregnancy - a content analysis of women's experiences of how their unborn baby moved less or differently2016In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 16, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Pregnant women sometimes worry about their unborn baby's health, often due to decreased fetal movements. The aim of this study was to examine how women, who consulted health care due to decreased fetal movements, describe how the baby had moved less or differently.

    METHODS: Women were recruited from all seven delivery wards in Stockholm, Sweden, during 1/1 - 31/12 2014. The women completed a questionnaire after it was verified that the pregnancy was viable. A modified content analysis was used to analyse 876 questionnaires with the women's responses to, "Try to describe how your baby has moved less or had changes in movement".

    RESULTS: Four categories and six subcategories were identified: "Frequency" (decreased frequency, absence of kicks and movement), "Intensity" (weaker fetal movements, indistinct fetal movements), "Character" (changed pattern of movements, slower movements) and "Duration". In addition to the responses categorised in accordance with the question, the women also mentioned how they had tried to stimulate the fetus to move and that they had difficulty in distinguishing fetal movements from contractions. Further, they described worry due to incidents related to changed pattern of fetal movements.

    CONCLUSION: Women reported changes in fetal movement concerning frequency, intensity, character and duration. The challenge from a clinical perspective is to inform pregnant women about fetal movements with the goal of minimizing unnecessary consultations whilst at the same time diminishing the length of pre-hospital delay if the fetus is at risk of fetal compromise.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: Not applicable.

  • 6. Malm, Mari-Cristin
    et al.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Rubertsson, Christine
    Hildingsson, Ingegerd
    Lindgren, Helena
    Women's experiences of two different self-assessment methods for monitoring fetal movements in full-term pregnancy - a crossover trial2014In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 14, p. 349-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Low maternal awareness of fetal movements is associated with negative birth outcomes. Knowledge regarding pregnant women's compliance with programs of systematic self-assessment of fetal movements is needed. The aim of this study was to investigate women's experiences using two different self-assessment methods for monitoring fetal movements and to determine if the women had a preference for one or the other method.

    Methods

    Data were collected by a crossover trial; 40 healthy women with an uncomplicated full-term pregnancy counted the fetal movements according to a Count-to-ten method and assessed the character of the movements according to the Mindfetalness method. Each self-assessment was observed by a midwife and followed by a questionnaire. A total of 80 self-assessments was performed; 40 with each method.

    Results

    Of the 40 women, only one did not find at least one method suitable. Twenty of the total of 39 reported a preference, 15 for the Mindfetalness method and five for the Count-to-ten method. All 39 said they felt calm, relaxed, mentally present and focused during the observations. Furthermore, the women described the observation of the movements as safe and reassuring and a moment for communication with their unborn baby.

    Conclusions

    In the 80 assessments all but one of the women found one or both methods suitable for self-assessment of fetal movements and they felt comfortable during the assessments. More women preferred the Mindfetalness method compared to the count-to-ten method, than vice versa.

  • 7.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Sormunen, Taina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Rudenhed, Lisa
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Pettersson, Karin
    Sleeping patterns of Swedish women experiencing a stillbirth between 2000-2014: an observational study2016In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 193-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: External (to the fetus) stressors may act together with maternal factors as well as fetal and placental factors to increase the risk of stillbirth. Data published in 2011 indicate non-left side sleeping positions, particularly the supine one, is such a stressor; we do not know, however, if this new knowledge has influenced the choice of sleeping position among pregnant women.

    METHODS: Using a web-based questionnaire made available at the home page of the Swedish national infant foundation we collected information on sleeping positions among women who gave birth to a stillborn baby between 2000 and 2014.

    RESULTS: The questionnaire was completed by 583 women. About one third of the women reporting their sleeping position stated that they lay down on their the left side when going to bed, and another third reported lying down as often on the left as on the right side. Figures for typically going to bed on the left side the 4 weeks preceding the stillbirth was as follows: 72 (30 %) of 242 between 2011 and 2014 and 86 (27 %) of 313 between 2000 and 2010. Among the 240 women who remembered their position when waking up on the day the stillbirth was diagnosed, 63 (26 %) reported a supine position.

    CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that one third of the women went to bed on the left side the month before the stillbirth. The data are consistent with the notion that efforts in Sweden to advise women to lie on their left side when going to bed may decrease the rate of stillbirth.

1 - 7 of 7
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