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  • 1. Gardulf, Ann
    et al.
    Nilsson, Jan
    Florin, Jan
    Leksell, Janeth
    Lepp, Margret
    Lindholm, Christina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Nordström, Gun
    Theander, Kersti
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Johansson, Eva
    The Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale: Self-reported competence among nursing students on the point of graduation2016In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 36, p. 165-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: International organisations, e.g. WHO, stress the importance of competent registered nurses (RN) for the safety and quality of healthcare systems. Low competence among RNs has been shown to increase the morbidity and mortality of inpatients.

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate self-reported competence among nursing students on the point of graduation (NSPGs), using the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale, and to relate the findings to background factors.

    METHODS AND PARTICIPANTS: The NPC Scale consists of 88 items within eight competence areas (CAs) and two overarching themes. Questions about socio-economic background and perceived overall quality of the degree programme were added. In total, 1086 NSPGs (mean age, 28.1 [20-56]years, 87.3% women) from 11 universities/university colleges participated.

    RESULTS: NSPGs reported significantly higher scores for Theme I "Patient-Related Nursing" than for Theme II "Organisation and Development of Nursing Care". Younger NSPGs (20-27years) reported significantly higher scores for the CAs "Medical and Technical Care" and "Documentation and Information Technology". Female NSPGs scored significantly higher for "Value-Based Nursing". Those who had taken the nursing care programme at upper secondary school before the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) programme scored significantly higher on "Nursing Care", "Medical and Technical Care", "Teaching/Learning and Support", "Legislation in Nursing and Safety Planning" and on Theme I. Working extra paid hours in healthcare alongside the BSN programme contributed to significantly higher self-reported scores for four CAs and both themes. Clinical courses within the BSN programme contributed to perceived competence to a significantly higher degree than theoretical courses (93.2% vs 87.5% of NSPGs).

    SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION: Mean scores reported by NSPGs were highest for the four CAs connected with patient-related nursing and lowest for CAs relating to organisation and development of nursing care. We conclude that the NPC Scale can be used to identify and measure aspects of self-reported competence among NSPGs.

  • 2.
    Gellerstedt, Linda
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Medin, Jörgen
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Kumlin, Maria
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Rydell Karlsson, Monica
    Sleep as a topic in nursing education programs? A mixed method study of syllabuses and nursing students' perceptions2019In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 79, p. 168-174, article id S0260-6917(18)30846-3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Sleep is a basic human need and is considered important for maintaining health. It is even more important during illness due to its impact for example on our immune system. Nurses have an important role in identifying sleep deprivation. They are also in a unique position to promote and address sleep among patients. However, it is essential that they are provided with the appropriate knowledge during training.

    AIM: To explore and describe nursing students' perceptions of preparedness to adress and support patients' sleep during hospitalization and to apply sleep-promoting interventions in a clinical context. Furthermore, the aim was to investigate if, and how, the topic of sleep is explicitly incorporated in nursing education programs.

    DESIGN: A descriptive study based on a mixed method approach.

    METHODS: Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from program and course syllabuses and intended learning outcomes from three universities. Twenty-one nursing students from the same universities were interviewed during their final year of education.

    RESULTS: The results of both quantitative and qualitative data consistently show that education regarding sleep and patients' sleep is limited and, in some respects, absent in the Bachelor of Science Nursing programs investigated.

    CONCLUSION: This study indicates that education about sleep and patients' sleep in the nursing programs studied is insufficient and limited. This gap in knowledge may lead to prospective registered nurses using their own experiences instead of evidence-based knowledge when assessing, supporting and applying sleep-promoting interventions.

  • 3. Lilja Andersson, Petra
    et al.
    Ahlner-Elmqvist, Marianne
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Larsson, Maria
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Nursing students' experiences of assessment by the Swedish National Clinical Final Examination2013In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 536-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish National Clinical Final Examination (NCFE) was established in 2007 in order to examine nursing students' clinical competence upon completing their Bachelor's degree in nursing. The NCFE constitutes an innovative method of examination, divided into two parts: a written and bedside test. The aim of this study was to evaluate nursing students' experiences of being assessed by means of the NCFE, in order to obtain information that could be used to improve the examination. A survey was conducted using a questionnaire with open-ended questions concerning the written and the bedside part of the NCFE. The answers from 577 third-year nursing students were analysed using content analysis. The nursing students regarded the NCFE as promoting further learning and as an important means of quality assurance. Its comprehensive nature was perceived to tie the education together and contributed to the students' awareness of their own clinical competence. The strengths of the NCFE especially highlighted were its high degree of objectivity and the fact that it took place in a natural setting. However, the students felt that the NCFE did not cover the entire nursing programme and that it caused stress. It thus appears to be important to reconsider the written theoretical part of the examination and to standardise the bedside part.

  • 4.
    Nilsson, Jan
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Engström, Maria
    Florin, Jan
    Gardulf, Ann
    Carlsson, Marianne
    A short version of the nurse professional competence scale for measuring nurses' self-reported competence2018In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 71, p. 233-239, article id S0260-6917(18)30695-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale with 88-items has been used to measure self-reported competence among nursing students and registered nurses in many national and international nursing research projects. However, a shorter version of the scale with maintained quality has been requested to further enhance its usability.

    OBJECTIVES: To develop and evaluate the construct validity and internal consistency of a shorter version of the NPC Scale.

    DESIGN: A developmental and methodological design.

    PARTICIPANTS AND SETTINGS: The study was based on a sample of 1810 nursing students at the point of graduation from 12 universities in Sweden.

    METHODS: The number of items in the original NPC Scale was reduced using several established research steps and then evaluated for data quality and construct validity using principal component analysis and confirmatory factor analysis. Reliability was measured as internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha.

    RESULTS: The extensive process of reducing the number of items resulted in a version with 35 items. Principal component analysis resulted in six factors explaining 53.6% of the variance: "Nursing Care", "Value-based Nursing Care", "Medical and Technical Care", "Care Pedagogics", "Documentation and Administration of Nursing Care", and "Development, Leadership, and Organization of Nursing Care". All factors showed Cronbach's alpha values of >0.70. The confirmative factor analysis goodness-of-fit indexes were for root mean square error of approximation 0.05 and for comparative fit index 0.89.

    CONCLUSIONS: The NPC Scale Short Form (NPC Scale-SF) 35-items revealed promising results with a six-factor structure explaining 53.6% of the total variance. This 35-item scale can be an asset when used alone and together with other instruments it can provide the possibility of more complex analyses of self-reported competence among nursing students and registered nurses.

  • 5. Nilsson, Jan
    et al.
    Johansson, Eva
    Egmar, Ann-Charlotte
    Florin, Jan
    Leksell, Janeth
    Lepp, Margret
    Lindholm, Christina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Nordström, Gun
    Theander, Kersti
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Gardulf, Ann
    Development and validation of a new tool measuring nurses self-reported professional competence --the nurse professional competence (NPC) Scale2014In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 574-580Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To develop and validate a new tool intended for measuring self-reported professional competence among both nurse students prior to graduation and among practicing nurses. The new tool is based on formal competence requirements from the Swedish Board of Health and Welfare, which in turn are based on WHO guidelines.

    DESIGN: A methodological study including construction of a new scale and evaluation of its psychometric properties.

    PARTICIPANTS AND SETTINGS: 1086 newly graduated nurse students from 11 universities/university colleges.

    RESULTS: The analyses resulted in a scale named the NPC (Nurse Professional Competence) Scale, consisting of 88 items and covering eight factors: "Nursing care", "Value-based nursing care", "Medical/technical care", "Teaching/learning and support", "Documentation and information technology", "Legislation in nursing and safety planning", "Leadership in and development of nursing care" and "Education and supervision of staff/students". All factors achieved Cronbach's alpha values greater than 0.70. A second-order exploratory analysis resulted in two main themes: "Patient-related nursing" and "Nursing care organisation and development". In addition, evidence of known-group validity for the NPC Scale was obtained.

    CONCLUSIONS: The NPC Scale, which is based on national and international professional competence requirements for nurses, was comprehensively tested and showed satisfactory psychometrical properties. It can e.g. be used to evaluate the outcomes of nursing education programmes, to assess nurses' professional competences in relation to the needs in healthcare organisations, and to tailor introduction programmes for newly employed nurses.

  • 6. Theander, Kersti
    et al.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Florin, Jan
    Gardulf, Ann
    Johansson, Eva
    Lindholm, Christina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Nordström, Gun
    Nilsson, Jan
    Adjusting to future demands in healthcare: Curriculum changes and nursing students' self-reported professional competence2015In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 37, p. 178-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Nursing competence is of significant importance for patient care. Newly graduated nursing students rate their competence as high. However, the impact of different designs of nursing curricula on nursing students' self-reported nursing competence areas is seldom reported.

    OBJECTIVES: To compare newly graduated nursing students' self-reported professional competence before and after the implementation of a new nursing curriculum. The study had a descriptive comparative design. Nursing students, who graduated in 2011, having studied according to an older curriculum, were compared with those who graduated in 2014, after a new nursing curriculum with more focus on person-centered nursing had been implemented.

    SETTING: A higher education nursing program at a Swedish university.

    PARTICIPANTS: In total, 119 (2011 n=69, 2014 n=50) nursing students responded.

    METHODS: Nursing students' self-reported professional competencies were assessed with the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) scale.

    RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the two groups of nursing students, who graduated in 2011 and 2014, respectively, with regard to age, sex, education, or work experience. Both groups rated their competencies as very high. Competence in value-based nursing was perceived to be significantly higher after the change in curriculum. The lowest competence, both in 2011 and 2014, was reported in education and supervision of staff and students.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that newly graduated nursing students - both those following the old curriculum and the first batch of students following the new one - perceive that their professional competence is high. Competence in value-based nursing, measured with the NPC scale, was reported higher after the implementation of a new curriculum, reflecting curriculum changes with more focus on person-centered nursing.

  • 7. Warne, Tony
    et al.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Papastavrou, Evridiki
    Tichelaar, Erna
    Tomietto, Marco
    Van den Bossche, Koen
    Moreno, Maria Flores Vizcaya
    Saarikoski, Mikko
    An exploration of the clinical learning experience of nursing students in nine European countries2010In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 30, p. 809-815Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of the study was to develop a composite and comparative view of what factors enhance the learning experiences of student nurses whilst they are in clinical practice. The study involved students undertaking general nurse training programmes in nine Western European countries. The study focused on: (1) student nurse experiences of clinical learning environments, (2) the supervision provided by qualified nurses in clinical placements, and (3) the level of interaction between student and nurse teachers. The study utilised a validated theoretical model: the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher (CLES + T) evaluation scale. The evaluation scale has a number of sub-dimensions: Pedagogical atmosphere on the ward; Supervisory Relationships; the Leadership Style of Ward Managers; Premises of Nursing; and the Role of the Nurse Teacher. Data (N = 1903) was collected from Cyprus, Belgium, England, Finland, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Spain and Sweden using web-based questionnaire 2007–2008. The findings revealed that respondents were generally satisfied with their clinical placements. There was clear support for the mentorship approach; 57% of respondents had a successful mentorship experience although some 18% of respondents experienced unsuccessful supervision. The most satisfied students studied at a university college, and had at least a seven week clinical placement supported by individualised mentorship relationships. Learning to become a nurse is a multidimensional process that requires both significant time being spent working with patients and a supportive supervisory relationship.

  • 8.
    Westerbotn, Margareta
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Kneck, Åsa
    Hovland, Olav Johannes
    Elrond, Malene
    Pedersen, Ingrid
    Lejonqvist, Gun-Britt
    Dulavik, Johild
    Ecklon, Tove
    Nilsson, Inga-Lill
    Sigurdardottir, Árún K
    Taking part in Nordic collaboration; nursing students' experiences and perceptions from a learning perspective: A qualitative study2015In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 712-717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Nordic networking of different kinds has a long tradition aiming to increase collaboration and understanding between citizens in different countries. Cultural competence in relation to health care and nursing is important for clinical nurses and is a central issue in nurse education.

    OBJECTIVE: To gain an understanding of what nurse students experienced and learned during an intensive course in diabetes together with students and nurse educators from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden and the Faroe Islands.

    METHODS: In 2012, an intensive course within the Nordic network, Nordkvist, was conducted in Faroe Islands with the theme "Nursing - to live a good life with diabetes". To answer the objective of the study, 26 students conducted written reflections based on two questions. The data was analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: Through meetings with nurse students and educators from the Nordic countries the intensive course strengthened the students' identification with the nursing profession. The students gained new perspectives on diabetes, such as how complex it can be to live with a chronic illness. Because of the difficulties in understanding one another and because of different mother tongues, the students gained a better understanding of patients' vulnerability in relation to hospital jargon and how it felt to be in an unfamiliar place.

    CONCLUSIONS: The intensive course increased the students' personal and professional growth, cross-cultural competence, and their identification with nursing. Students' understanding of health care in the Nordic countries improved as similarities and differences were recognized.

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