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  • 1. Georg, Carina
    et al.
    Welin, Elisabet
    Jirwe, Maria
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Karlgren, Klas
    Ulfvarson, Johanna
    Psychometric properties of the virtual patient version of the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric2019In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 38, p. 14-20, article id S1471-5953(18)30362-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of studies attest to the effectiveness of virtual patients in fostering and assessing students' development of clinical reasoning. An objective assessment of students' clinical reasoning is, however, challenging. This study focused on determining the psychometric properties of the virtual patient version of the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric, a rubric that is aimed at assessing nursing students' clinical reasoning processes when encountering virtual patients. A nonexperimental design was used in which data from 125 students' reflections on solving two different virtual patient scenarios were included in the analysis. First, a deductive content analysis was conducted using the categories of the rubric as a lens. After that, each student's performance was quantified according to the different levels of the rubric. Exploratory factor analysis and test of normality and reliability, including the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin test, Bartlett's test, the Shapiro-Wilk test, and Cronbach's alpha were used in the analysis. The result suggested three factors: "Understanding the patient", "Care planning" and "Reflecting" that explained 81.8% of the variance. Cronbach's alpha was 0.931. The result showed the rubric to be a valid assessment instrument for assessing nursing students' clinical reasoning when encountering virtual patients.

  • 2. Henoch, Ingela
    et al.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Bergh, Ingrid
    Strang, Susann
    Ek, Kristina
    Hammarlund, Kina
    Lundh Hagelin, Carina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Westin, Lars
    Österlind, Jane
    Browall, Maria
    Undergraduate nursing students' attitudes and preparedness toward caring for dying persons - A longitudinal study2017In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 26, p. 12-20, article id S1471-5953(17)30384-0Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nursing education needs to prepare students for care of dying patients. The aim of this study was to describe the development of nursing students' attitudes toward caring for dying patients and their perceived preparedness to perform end-of-life care. A longitudinal study was performed with 117 nursing students at six universities in Sweden. The students completed the Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) questionnaire at the beginning of first and second year, and at the end of third year of education. After education, the students completed questions about how prepared they felt by to perform end-of-life care. The total FATCOD increased from 126 to 132 during education. Five weeks' theoretical palliative care education significantly predicted positive changes in attitudes toward caring for dying patients. Students with five weeks' theoretical palliative care training felt more prepared and supported by the education to care for a dying patient than students with shorter education. A minority felt prepared to take care of a dead body or meet relatives.

  • 3. Nilsson, Jan
    et al.
    Johansson, Eva
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Florin, Jan
    Leksell, Janeth
    Lepp, Margret
    Lindholm, Christina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Nordström, Gun
    Theander, Kersti
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Gardulf, Ann
    Disaster nursing: Self-reported competence of nursing students and registered nurses, with focus on their readiness to manage violence, serious events and disasters2015In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 17, p. 102-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The World Health Organization and the International Council of Nurses recognises the importance of nurses' involvement in disaster preparedness and response. The aim of this study was to describe and compare self-reported disaster nursing competence (DNC) among nursing students (NSs) and among registered nurses (RNs) with professional experience. Further to investigate possible associations between self-reported DNC and background factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted of 569 NSs and 227 RNs. All respondents completed the 88-item Nurse Professional Competence Scale, including three items assessing DNC. Significant differences were found among the NSs depending on which University/University College they had attended. RNs reported significantly higher overall DNC and better ability to handle situations involving violence, and to apply principles of disaster medicine during serious events. RNs working in emergency care reported significantly better DNC ability, compared with RNs working in other areas of healthcare. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that working night shift and working in emergency care were positively associated with high self-reported overall DNC. The results indicate that workplace experience of serious events increase the readiness of registered nurses to handle violence, to act in accordance with safety regulations, and to apply principles of disaster medicine during serious events.

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