shh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 19 of 19
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andrén, Anna
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Akselsson, Anna
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Ali, Salma Burhan
    Lindgren, Helena
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Osman, Hodan Mohamoud
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Miscommunication influences how women act when fetal movements decrease: An interview study with Swedish Somali migrant women2023In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 126, article id 103796Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To explore how Swedish Somali migrant women perceive fetal movements, process information about fetal movements, and take actions if decreased fetal activity occurs.

    DESIGN: A qualitative study based on individual semi-structured interviews. The interviews were analysed using content analysis.

    SETTING: The study was conducted in Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: Swedish Somali migrant women (n=15) pregnant in their third trimester or recently given birth.

    FINDINGS: The analysis led to the main category: tailored information about fetal movements enhances the possibility to seek care if the movements decrease. The results are described in the generic categories: explanatory models determine action; and understand and interpret information.

    KEY CONCLUSIONS: Miscommunication on fetal movements can be a hurdle for Swedish Somali migrant women that may have impact on stillbirth prevention and the quality of care. Improved communication and information tailored to individual needs is essential to achieve equality for women and their newborns.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The midwife can be used as a hub for reassuring that adequate information about fetal movements reaches each individual woman in antenatal care. Individualised information on fetal movements based on the women's own understanding is suggested to increase the possibility that the pregnant woman will seek care if the movements decrease. Somali women's verbal communication can be used to spread accurate information in the Somali community on the importance of seeking care if fetal movements decrease.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Asplin, Nina
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Wessel, Hans
    Marions, Lena
    Georgsson Öhman, Susanne
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Pregnancy termination due to fetal anomaly: women's reactions, satisfaction and experiences of care2014In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 620-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    to explore what women who have had a pregnancy terminated due to a detected fetal malformation perceived as having been important in their encounters with caregivers for promoting their healthy adjustment and well-being.

    METHOD:

    an exploratory descriptive design was used. Semi-structured interviews were audiotaped, and the information pathway described. The text was processed through qualitative content analysis in six steps.

    SETTING:

    four fetal care referral centres in Stockholm, Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS:

    11 women opting for pregnancy termination due to fetal malformation.

    FINDINGS:

    in-depth understanding and compassion are important factors in providing the feeling of support people need so they are able to adapt to crisis. The women emphasised that the caregivers have to communicate a sense of responsibility, hope and respect and provide on-going care for them to feel assured of receiving good medical care and treatment. Aside from existing psychological conditions, the women identified as having emotional distress directly after termination and for at least the following three months. Most women experienced a range of negative emotions after pregnancy termination, including sadness, meaninglessness, loneliness, tiredness, grief, anger and frustration. Still some of this group had positive reactions because they experienced empathy and well-organised care.

    CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE:

    The most important factors associated with satisfaction regarding pregnancy termination due to a fetal malformation are the human aspects of care, namely state-dependent communication and in-depth understanding and compassion. The changes in care most often asked for were improvements in the level of standards and provision of adequate support through state-dependent communication, in-depth understanding and compassion, and complete follow-up routines and increased resources. Targeted education for the caregivers may be suited to ensuring that they properly meet needs of their patients.

  • 3. Avelin, Pernilla
    et al.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Säflund, Karin
    Wredling, Regina
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Parental grief and relationships after the loss of a stillborn baby2013In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 668-673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: to describe the grief of mothers and fathers and its influence on their relationships after the loss of a stillborn baby. DESIGN: a postal questionnaire at three months, one year and two years after stillbirth. SETTING: a study of mothers and fathers of babies stillborn during a one-year period in the Stockholm region of Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: 55 parents, 33 mothers and 22 fathers. FINDINGS: mothers and fathers stated that they became closer after the loss, and that the feeling deepened over the course of the following year. The parents said that they began grieving immediately as a gradual process, both as individuals, and together as a couple. During this grieving process their expectations, expressions and personal and joint needs might have threatened their relationship as a couple, in that they individually felt alone at this time of withdrawal. While some mothers and fathers had similar grieving styles, the intensity and expression of grief varied, and the effects were profound and unique for each individual. KEY CONCLUSIONS: experiences following a loss are complex, with each partner attempting to come to terms with the loss and the resultant effect on the relationship with their partner. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: anticipating and being able to acknowledge the different aspects of grief will enable professionals to implement more effective intervention in helping couples grieve both individually and together.

  • 4. Barimani, M
    et al.
    Jonas, W
    Zwedberg, Sofia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Parents' experiences when students are present during labour and childbirth: A cross-sectional survey of parents in Sweden2019In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 77, p. 130-136, article id S0266-6138(19)30188-3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Various student groups participate in clinical intrapartum care, but limited data are available on parents' perceptions of student presence during labour and childbirth. This study explored parents' experiences of having a student present during labour and childbirth.

    DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: Qualitative study based on an analysis of 362 parents' responses to one open-ended question from a cross-sectional survey.

    RESULTS: When they experienced students as interactive and supportive, parents reacted positively to student participation. Parents displayed clear willingness to contribute to students' learning. Some parents, however, reported unexpected, uncomfortable, or inappropriate experiences that they attributed to insufficient autonomy or undergoing many vaginal examinations.

    KEY CONCLUSIONS: Parents, clinical supervisors, and students can benefit from clinical learning situations, but women's needs must be prioritised and student involvement balanced with women's right to choose who is with them during labour and childbirth.

  • 5. Barimani, Mia
    et al.
    Zwedberg, Sofia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Ulfsdottir, Hanna
    Open dialogue: A grounded theory study on peer learning at birthing units2022In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 111, article id 103355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Peer learning in clinical settings is supported in nursing research but has rarely been studied in the context of student midwives at birthing units.

    AIM: To create a theoretical model of peer learning in the context of birthing units.

    SETTINGS: Four hospitals and maternity units in Stockholm, Sweden.

    METHODS: A Straussian approach to grounded theory was applied. Data consisted of interviews with fifteen final-term student midwives and 21 preceptors. Further, six peer learning seminars were held with approximately 200 midwives. At these, data was collected from fourteen preceptors presenting their experiences of working with peer learning.

    FINDINGS: The core of the action emerging was the Open dialogue describing the communication between the pair of students, between students-preceptor and students-becoming parents, that developed skills in communication, participation and reduced prestige and hierarchy. It facilitated social interaction and reinforced a dynamic way of learning and teaching midwifery.

    CONCLUSIONS: With preparation and a clear framework, peer learning can be used with midwifery students at birthing units. The open dialogue includes the becoming family in decision making and fits in a woman centered care providing support, safety, and participation. The pedagogical benefits are consistent with previous studies on nursing students.

  • 6. Blomgren, Johanna
    et al.
    Gabrielsson, Sara
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Wagoro, Miriam C A
    Namutebi, Mariam
    Chimala, Eveles
    Lindgren, Helena
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Maternal health leaders' perceptions of barriers to midwife-led care in Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Somalia, and Uganda2023In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 124, p. 103734-, article id 103734Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To identify and examine barriers to midwife-led care in Eastern Africa and how these barriers can be reduced DESIGN: A qualitative inductive study with online focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews using content analysis SETTING: The study examines midwife-led care in Ethiopia, Malawi, Kenya, Somalia, and Uganda -five African countries with an unmet need for midwives and a need to improve maternal and neonatal health outcomes.

    PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-five participants with a health care profession background and current position as a maternal and child health leader from one of the five study countries.

    FINDINGS: The findings demonstrate barriers to midwife-led care connected to organisational structures, traditional hierarchies, gender disparities, and inadequate leadership. Societal and gendered norms, organisational traditions, and differences in power and authority between professions are some factors explaining why the barriers persist. A focus on intra- and multisectoral collaborations, the inclusion of midwife leaders, and providing midwives with role models to leverage their empowerment are examples of how to reduce the barriers.

    KEY CONCLUSIONS: This study provides new knowledge on midwife-led care from the perspectives of health leaders in five African countries. Transforming outdated structures to ensure midwives are empowered to deliver midwife-led care at all healthcare system levels is crucial to moving forward.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTISE: This knowledge is important as enhancing the midwife-led care provision is associated with substantially improved maternal and neonatal health outcomes, higher satisfaction of care, and enhanced utilisation of health system resources. Nevertheless, the model of care is not adequately integrated into the five countries' health systems. Future studies are warranted to further explore how reducing barriers to midwife-led care can be adapted at a broader level.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7. Erlandsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Warland, Jane
    Cacciatore, Joanne
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Seeing and holding a stillborn baby: mothers' feelings in relation to how their babies were presented to them after birth-findings from an online questionnaire2013In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 246-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: to determine if the way caregivers offer opportunities to see and hold a stillborn baby impacts a mother's feelings about the experience of seeing and holding her newborn. DESIGN AND SETTING: a web questionnaire hosted by the Swedish National Infant Foundation from March 2008 to April 2010. PARTICIPANTS: 840 eligible participants who had experienced a stillbirth after the 22nd gestational week from 1955 to 2010 and completed an online questionnaire about their experiences. METHODS: descriptive and inferential statistics. FINDINGS: when mothers were presented the baby as a normal part of birth without being asked if they wanted to see, they more often reported that the experience was comfortable compared to mothers who were asked if they wanted to see the baby 86% vs. 76% (p=<0.01). The incitation of fear in mothers was 70% vs. 80% (p=0.02) in favour of mothers who were not asked. Furthermore the mothers who were not asked more often stated that it felt natural and good when compared to those who said staff asked if the mother wanted to see, 73% vs. 61% (p=0.07) and (78%) vs. (69%) p=0.19, respectively. A trend was seen toward more mothers feeling natural, good, comfortable, and less frightened if the provider engaged in 'assumptive bonding', that is the baby is simply and naturally presented to the mother without asking her to choose. KEY CONCLUSIONS: mothers of stillborn babies felt more natural, good, comfortable and less frightened if the staff supported assumptive bonding by simply offering the baby to the mother. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: care providers should approach caring for grieving mothers with tenderness and humility, assuming that they will wish to see and hold their stillborn baby.

  • 8. Fooladi, Ensieh
    et al.
    Weller, Carolina
    Salehi, Maryam
    Abhari, Farideh Rezaee
    Stern, Jenny
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Using reproductive life plan-based information in a primary health care center increased Iranian women's knowledge of fertility, but not their future fertility plan: A randomized, controlled trial2018In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 67, p. 77-86, article id S0266-6138(18)30286-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Reproductive Life Plan (RLP)-based information in counseling has been reported in the USA and Sweden to increase women's knowledge of fertility and informed decision making about future fertility plans. This study examined if utilizing the RLP tool would have the same impact on Iranian women.

    DESIGN: A randomized, three-armed, controlled trial. 181 women were randomly allocated to the intervention group (IG, n = 61), control group 1 (CG1, n = 60) or control group 2 (CG2, n = 60).

    SETTING: A primary health care center in the Sari city, the Provincial capital of Mazandaran, Iran.

    PARTICIPANTS: Women of reproductive age who were able to conceive.

    INTERVENTIONS: The intervention group received oral and written information about fertility based on the RLP tool. Participants were contacted 2 months after the intervention. The primary outcome measure was the change in women's knowledge of fertility, particularly folic acid intake prior to pregnancy, over a 2 month period. The change in women's family planning intentions were also assessed. The participants in the IG shared their experiences at follow-up.

    FINDINGS: At baseline, there was no difference between the groups regarding the mean knowledge of fertility score. At 2 months, after adjustment for age, history of pregnancy and baseline values, the between group difference in change from baseline was 5.8 (p < 0.001). While there was no significant difference between the IG and CG1 for folic acid intake prior to pregnancy at baseline, the group difference for folic acid intake prior to pregnancy post intervention was statistically significant (85% vs 25%, p < 0.001). At follow-up, women's desire to have more children, preferred age to conceive the last child and the desired age gap between children in the IG and CG1 did not significantly change over time. Women reported the RLP counseling tool used by midwives as useful.

    KEY CONCLUSIONS: Provision of RLP-based information for Iranian women with a clear pregnancy intention in the context of a stable relationship, increased knowledge of fertility without changing their future fertility plan. The RPL counseling tool was appreciated by study participants. The lack of improvement in women's fertility intentions over time may reflect the involvement of other factors influencing decision making about childbearing in Iran. Whether the RLP can change women's behavior is yet to be established.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The RLP can be used by health care professionals, especially midwives, as a tool to increase women's fertility knowledge, which may result in fertility behavior change.

  • 9.
    Georgsson, Susanne
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Linde, Anders
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Pettersson, Karin
    Nilsson, Rebecca
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    To be taken seriously and receive rapid and adequate care: womens' requests when they consult health care for reduced fetal movements.2016In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 40, p. 102-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: decreased fetal movement is a reason for women to seek health care in late pregnancy.

    OBJECTIVE: to examine what pregnant women who present with decreased fetal movements want to communicate to health care professionals and to other women in the same situation.

    DESIGN: a qualitative descriptive study.

    SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: questionnaires were distributed in all seven labour wards in Stockholm from 1 January to 31 December 2014 to women who consulted care due to decreased fetal movements. In total, 3555 questionnaires were completed of which 1 000 were included in this study. The women's responses to the open ended question: "Is there something you want to communicate to health care professionals who take care of women with decreased fetal movement or to women who experience decreased fetal movements?", were analysed with manifest content analysis.

    FINDING: three categories were revealed about requests to health care professionals: Pay attention to the woman and take her seriously, Rapid and adequate care and Improved information on fetal movements. Regarding what the women want to communicate to other pregnant women, four categories were revealed: Contact health care for check-up, Pay attention to fetal movement, Recommended source of information and Practical advice.

    CONCLUSION: pregnant women who consult health care due to decreased fetal movements want to be taken seriously and receive rapid and adequate care with the health of the infant as the primary priority. The women requested uniform information about decreased fetal movements. They wished to convey to others in the same situation the importance of consulting care once too often rather than one time too few.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10. Hildingsson, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Fahlbeck, Hanna
    Larsson, Birgitta
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Johansson, Margareta
    How midwives' perceptions of work empowerment have changed over time: A Swedish comparative study2023In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 118, article id 103599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper was to compare current perceptions of empowerment in their work with results from a sample of midwives recruited 2012.

    DESIGN: A comparative cross-sectional cohort study of national samples of midwives in Sweden from 2012 to 2022.

    PARTICIPANTS: 475 midwives recruited from the Swedish midwifery association in 2012 and 1782 through two midwifery unions in 2022.

    METHODS: Data were collected using a questionnaire with background information and the revised version of the Perception of Empowerment Scale (PEMS). Mean scores and domains of the PEMS were compared between the years.

    FINDINGS: Midwives' perceptions of empowerment changed over time, in both directions. Their perception of their skills and education, advocating for and empowering women as well as support from the team and manager increased over the years. Midwives in 2022 were less likely to perceive that they were involved in a midwifery-led practice, and the communication with managers was rated lower. Midwives sensed a lack of professional recognition from the medical profession and their contribution to the care of birthing women. Access to resources for birthing women was perceived lower in 2022 compared to 2012. Younger age, shorter work experience and working in labour wards or postnatal wards were associated with lower perceptions of empowerment.

    CONCLUSIONS: Midwives need to have the authority and reality to practice midwife-led care, to receive control over their work. Good communication and recognition from the medical profession is essential to be empowered. This is important in order to maintain a healthy workforce.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11. Lindgren, Helena
    et al.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Pettersson, Karin
    Skokic, Viktor
    Akselsson, Anna
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Epidural use among women with spontaneous onset of labour: An observational study using data from a cluster-randomised controlled trial2021In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 103, article id 103156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the proportion of pregnant women who use epidural analgesia during birth differed between women registered at a maternity clinic randomised to Mindfetalness or to routine care.

    DESIGN: An observational study including women born in Sweden with singleton pregnancies, with spontaneous onset of labour from 32 weeks' gestation. Data used from a cluster-randomised controlled trial applying the intention-to-treat principle in 67 maternity clinics where women were randomised to Mindfetalness or to routine care. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02865759).

    INTERVENTIONS: Midwives were instructed to distribute a leaflet about Mindfetalness to pregnant women at 25 weeks' gestation. Mindfetalness is a self-assessment method for the woman to use to become familiar with the unborn baby's fetal movement pattern. When practising the method in third trimester, the women are instructed to daily lie down on their side, when the baby is awake, and focus on the movements' intensity, character and frequency (but not to count each movement).

    FINDINGS: Of the 18 501 women with spontaneous onset of labour, 47 percent used epidural during birth. Epidural was used to a lower extent among women registered at a maternity clinic randomised to Mindfetalness than women in the routine-care group (46.2% versus 47.8%, RR 0.97, CI 0.94-1.00, p= 0.04). Epidural was more common among primiparous women, women younger than 35 years, those with educational levels below university, with BMI ≥25 and with a history of receiving psychiatric care or psychological treatment for mental illness.

    CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Pregnant women who were informed about a self-assessment method, with the aim of becoming familiar with the unborn baby's fetal movement pattern, used epidural to a lower extent than women who were not informed about the method. Future studies are needed to investigate and understand the association between Mindfetalness and the reduced usage of epidural during birth.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12.
    Molin, Beata
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Zwedberg, Sofia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Berger, Anna-Karin
    Sand, Anna
    Georgsson, Susanne
    Grieving over the past and struggling forward: A qualitative study of women's experiences of chronic pain one year after childbirth2021In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 103, article id 103098Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe women's experiences of chronic pain related to childbirth approximately one year after labour.

    DESIGN: A qualitative design with face-to-face interviews analysed using inductive qualitative content analysis.

    PARTICIPANTS: Twenty women who reported chronic pain, with onset during pregnancy and/or following labour, approximately one year after childbirth.

    FINDINGS: The analysis revealed an essential theme, "Grieving over the past and struggling forward", and three categories "Mourning the losses", "Struggling with the present" and "Managing the future".

    CONCLUSIONS: This study provides new knowledge about women's experiences of chronic pain one year after childbirth. The pain severely reduced women´s previous ability to perform physical and social activities, negatively impacted psychological well-being and altered their self-image. Most of the women adopted a positive attitude and hoped for improved health in the future, although constantly struggling with the pain and its consequences.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: This knowledge is particularly important as chronic pain may not diminish with time in predisposed individuals who may need help and support from health professionals in their endeavour to manage their pain. Healthcare providers, i.e. midwives, gynaecologists and general practitioners need to understand women´s experiences of chronic pain from their own perspective to improve identification and treatment of pain following childbirth, thus preventing women's suffering and potential long-term health problems. Future studies are warranted to further explore and discuss women's coping strategies, health seeking behaviour and experiences of health care.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Malm, Mari-Cristin
    Lindgren, Helena
    Pettersson, Karin
    Franklin Larsson, Lise-Lotte
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Being alone in silence - Mothers' experiences upon confirmation of their baby's death in utero2014In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 30, no 3, p. e91-e95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: to explore mothers' experiences of the confirmation of ultrasound examination results and how they were told that their baby had died in-utero.

    DESIGN: in-depth interviews.

    SETTING: Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: 26 mothers of stillborn babies.

    MEASUREMENT: narratives were analysed using a qualitative content analysis with an inductive approach.

    FINDINGS: the mothers experienced that silence prevailed during the entire process of confirming the ultrasound results. Typically all present in the ultrasound room were concentrating and focusing on what they observed on the screen, no one spoke to the mother. The mothers had an instinctive feeling that their baby might be dead based on what they observed on the ultrasound screen and on their interpretation of the body language of the clinicians and midwives. Some mothers reported a time delay in receiving information about their baby's death. Experiencing uncertainty about the information received was also noticed.

    CONCLUSION: mothers emphasised an awareness of silence and feelings of being completely alone while being told of the baby's death.

    IMPLICATION FOR PRACTICE: the prevalence of silence during an ultrasound examination may in certain cases cause further psychological trauma for the mother of a stillborn baby. One way to move forward given these results may be to provide obstetric personnel sufficient training on how difficult information might be more effectively and sensitively provided in the face of an adverse pregnancy outcome.

  • 14.
    Stern, Jenny
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Molin, Moa Sterner
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Fernaeus, Maja
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Georgsson, Susanne
    Carlsson, Tommy
    Contraceptive counseling about adverse reactions of intrauterine contraception: Exploration of narratives found in web-based discussion boards2022In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 104, article id 103166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: the possibility of experiencing adverse reactions is an important aspect of contraceptive decision-making and information about this topic is highlighted as an essential aspect of contraceptive counseling. The aim of this study was to explore experiences of contraceptive counseling about potential adverse reactions of intrauterine contraception.

    DESIGN: exploratory qualitative study of messages in discussion boards, analyzed with inductive qualitative content analysis.

    SETTING: two large public Swedish web-based discussion boards about sexual and reproductive health.

    PARTICIPANTS: threads related to the aim were identified through searches in the discussion boards during 2019 and 2020, resulting in in 43 included posters who had written 140 messages in total.

    FINDINGS: the themes 'difficulties making an informed decision due to insufficient and untrustworthy information about adverse reactions' and 'feeling dismissed when communicating about experienced adverse reactions' illustrate the results. Posters emphasized the importance of sufficient information about adverse reactions. However, professionals were perceived as overly optimistic regarding intrauterine contraception and focusing on mild or common reactions. The importance of feeling that their adverse reactions were acknowledged was articulated, but posters felt that some professionals dismissed the reactions when being told about it, resulting in frustration and dissatisfaction with care. The discussion boards contained narratives describing a resistance among professionals to send in a formal report about the adverse reaction.

    KEY CONCLUSIONS: according to statements made by posters who have experience of adverse reactions of intrauterine contraception, contraceptive counseling have room for improvement in regard to inclusion of comprehensive information about adverse reactions. The findings illustrate the importance that clients who experience adverse reactions of intrauterine contraception feel they are acknowledged and offered adequate support.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: echoing guidelines for high-quality contraceptive counseling, the narratives provide further weight that professionals need to have adequate training and resources to offer comprehensive information about adverse reactions of intrauterine contraception. The findings call attention to the importance of follow-up services for clients who experience adverse reactions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15.
    Ulfsdottir, Hanna
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Saltvedt, Sissel
    Ekborn, Marie
    Georgsson, Susanne
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Like an empowering micro-home: A qualitative study of women's experience of giving birth in water2018In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 67, p. 26-31, article id S0266-6138(18)30277-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe women´s experiences and perceptions of giving birth in water.

    DESIGN: A qualitative study with in-depth interviews three to five months after the birth. A content analysis of the interviews was made.

    SETTING: One city-located hospital in Stockholm, offering waterbirth to low risk women.

    PARTICIPANTS: 20 women, 12 primiparas and 8 multiparas, aged 27-39.

    MEASUREMENTS AND FINDINGS: The overall theme emerging from the analysis was, "Like an empowering micro-home", which describes the effect of being strengthened, enabled and authorized in the birth process. Three categories were found: "Synergy between body and mind", "Privacy and discretion", and "Natural and pleasant".

    KEY CONCLUSIONS: The immersion in warm water provided the women with conditions that helped them to cope and feel confident during labour and birth. The homelike and limited space of a bathtub helped give a relaxed feeling of privacy, safety, control and focus for the women.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: This study contributes to a deeper understanding of what waterbirth offers to women. For some women, waterbirth may be a way to accomplish an empowering and positive birth experience, and could work as a tool that preserves the normality of, and increases self-efficacy in, childbirth.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16.
    Ulfsdottir, Hanna
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Saltvedt, Sissel
    Georgsson, Susanne
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Women's experiences of waterbirth compared with conventional uncomplicated births2019In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 79, article id 102547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To compare childbirth experiences between women having a waterbirth and women having an uncomplicated conventional birth.

    DESIGN: A prospective cohort study using the validated Childbirth Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) six weeks postpartum. The 22-item questionnaire assesses four domains of the childbirth experience; Own capacity, Professional support, Perceived safety and Participation. These four domains constituted the main outcome of the study. Further, supplementary questions about the second stage of labour were added to the web-questionnaire.

    SETTING: One city-located hospital in Stockholm and one small-town hospital in Southern Sweden offering waterbirth to low risk women.

    PARTICIPANTS: 215 women; 99 nulli- and 116 multiparas. 111 gave birth in water and 104 had an uncomplicated conventional birth.

    MEASUREMENTS AND FINDINGS: The total CEQ score did not differ between the groups, while women having a waterbirth scored significantly higher in the domain, "Own capacity" and lower in the domain, "Professional support". Women having a waterbirth rated less pain and higher scores of being in control in the second stage of labour.

    KEY CONCLUSIONS: A waterbirth seems to empower and enhance women's capacity for those who choose this alternative. Waterbirth can improve their birth experience and can possibly make women less dependent on the midwife.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: To provide waterbirth could be a way of empowering women and giving them a positive birth experience.

  • 17.
    Zwedberg, Sofia
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Barimani, Mia
    When student midwives are present during labour and childbirth in a peer-learning model: An interview study of parents in Sweden2022In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 104, article id 103173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: For peer learning to be useful in clinical practice, we need to know how parents experience peer learning during labour and childbirth. This study explored how parents experienced having two students present during labour and childbirth in a peer-learning model.

    DESIGN: A qualitative approach using individual interviews followed by thematic inductive analysis.

    SETTING: Three hospitals and obstetric units in Stockholm, Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: Eleven women and nine partners.

    FINDINGS: The overarching theme was that of a fruitful model of health care, in which there were gains for both parents and students. Parents described feeling seen and cared for, being made aware of what was going on, and never being left alone (subtheme 1, Trustful relationship). Parents appreciated being able to observe student midwives' attendance to the tasks at hand and that they, the two students, learned from each other (subtheme 2, Advantages for students).

    CONCLUSIONS: The parent couple was able to build a trustful relationship with both students. Furthermore, could parents only see advantages for students in a peer-learning model. Parents reported generous support and were willing to contribute to student education. Parents took advantage of the learning taking place between the two students. The model deserves to be incorporated in the midwifery-student internships to complement more individually assisted births.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18.
    Zwedberg, Sofia
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    K, Forslund Frykedal
    M, Rosander
    A, Berlin
    M, Barimani
    Midwives' experiences as preceptors and the development of good preceptorships in obstetric units2020In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 87, article id 102718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To study midwives' experience in their role as a preceptor and their perception on how to best support midwifery students in obstetrics units. Obstetric units are an important learning area for student midwives but knowledge on how to become a good midwife preceptor is limited.

    DESIGN: This qualitative study explores midwife preceptors' experience of supervising midwifery students in three obstetric units in Sweden. Following ethical approval seventeen midwife preceptors were interviewed and data were analysed thematically.

    FINDINGS: Thematic analysis of the interviews resulted in the identification of two themes and five subthemes: (1) self-efficacy in the preceptor role which involves (a) being confident in the professional position and (b) having the support of management and colleagues and (2) supporting the student to attain self-confidence and independence which entails (a) helping the student to grow, (b) facilitating reflection in learning situations, and (c) "taking a step back".

    KEY CONCLUSION: Good preceptorship occurs when midwives achieve full self-efficacy, when they master the preceptor role, and when they have enhanced their abilities to help, the student reach confidence and independence.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Health care organisations needs to develop and support midwifery preceptorships.

  • 19. Åhlund, Susanne
    et al.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Zwedberg, Sofia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Perineal pain the first year after childbirth and uptake of post-partum check-up: A Swedish cohort study2019In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 78, p. 85-90, article id S0266-6138(19)30208-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this prospective cohort study was to investigate the prevalence of perineal pain related to the perineal injury within the first year after childbirth. The study further explored the rates of postpartum check-up attendance, and whether they had undergone a vaginal examination, pelvic floor assessment and exercise advice.

    RESEARCH DESIGN: The primary outcome was women's self-perceived and selfreported occurrence of pain related to perineal injuries (within three, six and 12 months) after birth. Secondary outcomes were uptake of postpartum check-up six to 12 weeks after birth and care received at the check-up. A postal questionnaire was completed one year after birth. Descriptive data was used to present data.

    FINDINGS: A total of 461 Swedish women (77%) were included in the study. The majority of women with severe perineal injuries (75.0%), and 61.8% of those with moderate injuries II suffered from perineal pain three months postpartum, while 60% with severe injuries and 38.7 with moderate injuries II still had perineal pain six months after birth. The postpartum check-up was attended by 90.6%. However, one out of four had not been given a pelvic examination or advised about pelvic floor exercises.

    KEY CONCLUSION: Many primiparas suffer from pain related to perineal injuries during the first year after birth. One out of ten women has problems with perineal pain one year postpartum. It is essential to investigate and recognize the impact of perineal pain on women's daily life and psychological and emotional wellbeing at the postpartum checkup.

1 - 19 of 19
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf