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  • 1. Hylin, Uffe
    et al.
    Nyholm, Helena
    Sophiahemmet University College.
    Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine
    Sophiahemmet University College.
    Ponzer, Sari
    Interprofessional training in clinical practice on a training ward for healthcare students: a two-year follow-up2007In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 277-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This follow-up study describes the former students' lasting impressions of a two-week interprofessional course on a training ward aimed at enhancing the understanding of the roles of other professions and the importance of communication for teamwork and for patient care as well as providing an opportunity for profession-specific training. A questionnaire with both closed and open-ended questions was sent to 633 former students two years after the course and 348 (55%) responded. The course was rated as very good and most of the former students had lasting and positive impressions. Ninety-two percent of respondents encouraged teamwork in their present work and 90% wanted to retain the course. The qualitative analysis of the open-ended questions resulted in five categories describing students' perceptions: professional role development, working in teams, tutoring, patient care and future aspects of the course and real world practice. Our results suggest that interprofessional training during undergraduate education provides lasting impressions that may promote teamwork in students' future occupational life.

  • 2. Klarare, Anna
    et al.
    Hansson, Johan
    Fossum, Bjöörn
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Fürst, Carl Johan
    Lundh Hagelin, Carina
    Team type, team maturity and team effectiveness in specialist palliative home care: an exploratory questionnaire study2019In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 504-511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To meet complex needs in persons and families within specialist palliative care, care team members are expected to work together in performing a comprehensive assessment of patient needs. Team type (how integrated team members work) and team maturity (group development) have been identified as components in team effectiveness and productivity. The aim of the study reported in this paper was to identify team types in specialist palliative care in Sweden, and to explore associations between team type, team maturity and team effectiveness in home care teams. A national web-based survey of team types, based on Thylefors questionnaire, and a survey of healthcare professionals using the Group Development Questionnaire (GDQ-SE3) to assess team developmental phase, effectiveness and productivity were used in an exploratory cross-sectional design. The participants were: Specialist palliative care teams in Sweden registered in the Palliative Care Directory (n = 77), and members of 11 specialist palliative home care teams. Teams comprised physicians, registered nurses, social workers, physiotherapists and/or occupational therapists, full-or part-time. Our national web survey results showed that the 77 investigated teams had existed from 7 to 21 years, were foremost of medium size and functioned as inter- or transprofessional teams. Results from the 61 HCPs, representing 11 teams, indicated that more mature teams tended to work in an integrated manner, rather than in parallel. The effectiveness ratio varied from 52% to 86% in teams. Recommendations arising from our findings include the need for clarification of team goals and professional roles together with prioritizing the development of desirable psychosocial traits and team processes in clinical settings.

  • 3.
    Lachmann, Hanna
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Fossum, Bjöörn
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Karlgren, Klas
    Ponzer, Sari
    Promoting reflection by using contextual activity sampling: a study on students' interprofessional learning2014In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 400-406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Students' engagement and reflection on learning activities are important during interprofessional clinical practice. The contextual activity sampling system (CASS) is a methodology designed for collecting data on experiences of ongoing activities by frequent distribution of questionnaires via mobile phones. The aim of this study was to investigate if the use of the CASS methodology affected students' experiences of their learning activities, readiness for interprofessional learning, academic emotions and experiences of interprofessional team collaboration. Student teams, consisting of 33 students in total from four different healthcare programs, were randomized into an intervention group that used CASS or into a control group that did not use CASS. Both quantitative (questionnaires) and qualitative (interviews) data were collected. The results showed that students in the intervention group rated teamwork and collaboration significantly higher after than before the course, which was not the case in the control group. On the other hand, the control group reported experiencing more stress than the intervention group. The qualitative data showed that CASS seemed to support reflection and also have a positive impact on students' experiences of ongoing learning activities and interprofessional collaboration. In conclusion, the CASS methodology provides support for students in their understanding of interprofessional teamwork.

  • 4.
    Lachmann, Hanna
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Ponzer, Sari
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Benson, Lina
    Karlgren, Klas
    Capturing students' learning experiences and academic emotions at an interprofessional training ward2013In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 137-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important goal for interprofessional education (IPE) in clinical settings is to support healthcare students in collaboratively developing their understanding of interprofessional teamwork. The aim of this study was to investigate students' learning experiences and academic emotions as they occur in actual context in relation to collaborative and trialogical activities during a clinical IPE course. The contextual activity sampling system methodology was used to collect data via mobile phones. Thirty-seven healthcare students (medical, nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy) reported their experiences, learning activities and academic emotions several times a day via their mobile phones during their 2-week course at an interprofessional training ward (IPTW). The results provided understanding of the students' experiences of their academic emotions and how they created new knowledge collaboratively. These collaborative knowledge creation activities occurred mostly when students from different professions were collaborating as a team (e.g. discussing patient care or participating in a ward round) and were also significantly related to optimal experiences, i.e. "flow" (high challenge in combination with high competence). In conclusion, these results emphasize the importance of collaboration among students during IPTW courses. Our results might help to optimize the design of IPE learning activities in clinical healthcare contexts

  • 5. Williams, Brett
    et al.
    Lynch, Marty
    Olaussen, Alex
    Lachmann, Hanna
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Kalén, Susanne
    Ponzer, Sari
    Translation and psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version of the Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale2018In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 63-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is widely accepted worldwide, as a key part of training for health professionals and critical to an effective, patient-centred healthcare system. Several tools have been developed to evaluate IPE programmes and interventions globally. Many of the widely-used tools have been successfully adapted to suit specific cohorts and different languages; the Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS), however, has not yet been translated and validated for use in Sweden. The aim of this study was to translate the IEPS into Swedish and validate the psychometric properties of this new version. The 12-item IEPS underwent translation into Swedish and back-translation into English by suitable independent translators to ensure items retained their meaning. The new Swedish version was completed by 164 medical and nursing, occupational therapy and physiotherapy students on clinical placements in Stockholm. Principal Axis Factoring (PAF) and Oblique Oblimin Rotation confirmed a three-factor structure, that explained 77.4% of variance. The new 10-item Swedish version IEPS displayed good internal consistency with an overall Cronbach's alpha of a = .88 and subscale values of .89, .88 and .66. The exclusion of two-items limits the transferability of this scale; however, the factor makeup was very similar to the original 12-item English version. It is suspected that minor differences were due to unavoidable deviations in meaning following translation (i.e. certain English words have no equivalent in Swedish). Nevertheless, the results imply that the Swedish version of the IEPS is a valid and reliable tool for assessing students' perceptions and attitudes towards IPE within the Swedish health education system.

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  • de-DE
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