shh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 18 of 18
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Amsberg, Susanne
    et al.
    Wijk, Ingrid
    Livheim, Fredrik
    Toft, Eva
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Anderbro, Therese
    Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for adult type 1 diabetes management: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial2018In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 11, article id e022234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Integrating diabetes self-management into daily life involves a range of complex challenges for affected individuals. Environmental, social, behavioural and emotional psychological factors influence the lives of those with diabetes. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of a stress management group intervention based on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) among adults living with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes.

    METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This study will use a randomised controlled trial design evaluating treatment as usual (TAU) and ACT versus TAU. The stress management group intervention will be based on ACT and comprises a programme divided into seven 2-hour sessions conducted over 14 weeks. A total of 70 patients who meet inclusion criteria will be recruited over a 2-year period with follow-up after 1, 2 and 5 years.The primary outcome measure will be HbA1c. The secondary outcome measures will be the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales, the Swedish version of the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey, the Swedish version of the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale, The Summary of Self-Care Activities, Acceptance Action Diabetes Questionnaire, Swedish Acceptance and Action Questionnaire and the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life. The questionnaires will be administered via the internet at baseline, after sessions 4 (study week 7) and 7 (study week 14), and 6, 12 and 24 months later, then finally after 5 years. HbA1c will be measured at the same time points.Assessment of intervention effect will be performed through the analysis of covariance. An intention-to-treat approach will be used. Mixed-model repeated measures will be applied to explore effect of intervention across all time points.

    ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study has received ethical approval (Dnr: 2016/14-31/1). The study findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications, conferences and reports to key stakeholders.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02914496; Pre-results.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2. Bohman, Tony
    et al.
    Holm, Lena W
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Pico-Espinosa, Oscar J
    Skillgate, Eva
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Healthy lifestyle behaviour and risk of long-duration troublesome neck pain among men and women with occasional neck pain: results from the Stockholm public health cohort2019In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 11, article id e031078Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The effect of a healthy lifestyle on the prognosis of neck pain is unknown. This study aimed to investigate if a healthy lifestyle behaviour influences the risk of long-duration troublesome neck pain among men and women with occasional neck pain.

    DESIGN: Longitudinal cohort study.

    SETTINGS: General population, and a subsample of the working population, in Stockholm County, Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: This study involved 5342 men and 7298 women, age 18 to 84, from the Stockholm Public Health Cohort, reporting occasional neck pain at baseline in 2006.

    MEASURES: Baseline information about leisure physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption and consumption of fruits and vegetables were dichotomised into recommendations for healthy/not healthy behaviour. The exposure, a healthy lifestyle behaviour, was categorised into four levels according to the number of healthy behaviours (HB) met. Generalised linear models were applied to assess the exposure on the outcome long-duration troublesome neck pain (activity-limiting neck pain ≥2 days/week during the past 6 months), at follow-up in 2010.

    RESULTS: The adjusted risk of long-duration troublesome neck pain decreased with increasing adherence to a healthy lifestyle behaviour among both men and women (trend test: p<0.05). Compared with the reference category, none or one HB, the risk decreased by 24% (risk ratio 0.76, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.98) among men and by 34% (0.66, 0.54 to 0.81) among women, with three or four HBs. The same comparison showed an absolute reduction of the outcome by 3% in men (risk difference -0.03, 95% CI -0.05 to -0.01) and 5% in women (-0.05,-0.08 to -0.03). Similar results were found in the working population subsample.

    CONCLUSION: Adhering to a healthy lifestyle behaviour decreased the risk of long-duration troublesome neck pain among men and women with occasional neck pain. The results add to previous research and supports the importance of promoting a healthy lifestyle behaviour.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3. Bohman, Tony
    et al.
    Holm, Lena W
    Lekander, Mats
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Skillgate, Eva
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Influence of work ability and smoking on the prognosis of long-duration activity-limiting neck/back pain: A cohort study of a Swedish working population2022In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 12, no 4, article id e054512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Long-duration activity-limiting neck/back pain is common, but the knowledge of what work and lifestyle factors that influence the prognosis is sparse. The objective was therefore to evaluate if two factors, good self-perceived work ability and no daily smoking, are associated with a favourable prognosis of long-duration activity-limiting neck/back pain in a working population, and if these exposures have a synergistic prognostic effect.

    DESIGN: A prospective cohort study based on three subsamples from the Stockholm Public Health Cohort.

    SETTINGS: A working population in Stockholm County, Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: Individuals, 18-61 years old, reporting long-duration activity-limiting neck/back pain the previous 6 months at baseline in 2010 (n=5177).

    MEASURES: The exposures were: self-perceived work ability (categorised into good, moderate and poor) and daily smoking (no/yes). The outcome in 2014 was 'absence of long-duration activity-limiting neck/back pain' the previous 6 months representing a favourable prognosis of reported problems at baseline in 2010. Risk ratios (RRs) and risk differences (RDs) with 95% CI was estimated by general linear regressions, and the synergistic effect was estimated by the synergy index (SI) with 95% CI.

    RESULTS: Participants with moderate or good work ability, respectively, had an adjusted RR for a favourable prognosis of 1.37 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.69), and 1.80 (1.49 to 2.17) in comparison with participants with poor work ability. The corresponding adjusted RD were 0.07 (0.02 to 0.11) and 0.17 (0.12 to 0.22). Participants not smoking on daily basis had an adjusted RR of 1.21 (1.02 to 1.42), and an adjusted RD of 0.05 (0.01 to 0.10) for a favourable outcome compared with daily smokers. The adjusted SI was 0.92 (0.60 to 1.43).

    CONCLUSION: For participants with long-duration activity-limiting neck/back pain, moderate or good self-perceived work ability and not being a daily smoker were associated with a favourable prognosis but having both exposures seemed to have no synergistic prognostic effect.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Edlund, Klara
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Nigicser, Isabel
    Sansone, Mikael
    Identeg, Fredrik
    Hedelin, Henrik
    Forsberg, Niklas
    Tranaeus, Ulrika
    Protocol for a 2-year longitudinal study of eating disturbances, mental health problems and overuse injuries in rock climbers (CLIMB)2023In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 9, article id e074631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Rock climbing is a rapidly growing sport in which performance may be affected by participant's weight and leanness, and there may be pressure on athletes with respect to their eating behaviour and body weight. However, there is sparse research performed on climbers, constituting a knowledge gap which the present study aims to fill. The primary outcomes of the study are to examine disordered eating and overuse injuries in rock climbers. Secondary variables are body image, indicators of relative energy deficiency, mental health problems, compulsive training, perfectionism, sleep quality and bone density.

    METHOD AND ANALYSIS: This prospective longitudinal study aims to recruit Swedish competitive rock climbers (>13 years) via the Swedish Climbing Federation. A non-athlete control group will be recruited via social media (n=equal of the climbing group). Data will be collected using streamlined validated web-based questionnaires with three follow-ups over 2 years. Inclusion criteria for rock climbers will be a minimum advanced level according to International Rock-Climbing Research Association. The non-athlete control group is matched for age and gender. Exclusion criteria are having competed at an elite level in any sport as well as training more often than twice per week. Statistical analyses will include multinominal logistic regression, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and structural equation modelling (SEM). We will assess effect measure modification when relevant and conduct sensitivity analyses to assess the impact of lost to follow-up.

    ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The Rock-Climbers' Longitudinal attitudes towards Injuries, Mental health and Body image study, CLIMB, was approved by the Swedish ethics authority (2021-05557-01). Results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed research papers, reports, research conferences, student theses and stakeholder communications.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT05587270.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Edlund, Klara
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Sundberg, Tobias
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Johansson, Fred
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Onell, Clara
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Rudman, Ann
    Holm, Lena W
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Grotle, Margreth
    Jensen, Irene
    Côté, Pierre
    Skillgate, Eva
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Sustainable UNiversity Life (SUN) study: Protocol for a prospective cohort study of modifiable risk and prognostic factors for mental health problems and musculoskeletal pain among university students2022In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 12, no 4, article id e056489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Mental health problems and musculoskeletal pain are common health problems among young adults including students. Little is known about the aetiology and prognosis of these problems in university students. We aim to determine the role of personal, sociodemographic, academic and environmental factors for risk and prognosis of symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress as well as musculoskeletal pain in university students. The constructs that will be studied are based on the biopsychosocial model and psychopathology associated with disabling pain. This model acknowledges illness to consist of interrelated mechanisms categorised into biological, psychological, environmental and social cues.

    METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This cohort study aims to recruit around 5000 Swedish full-time students. Data will be collected using five online surveys during one academic year. A subgroup (n=1851) of the cohort, recruited before the COVID-19 pandemic, receive weekly text messages with three short questions assessing mood, worry and pain, sent through the web-based platform SMS-track . Statistical analyses will include Kaplan-Meier estimates, Cox regression analyses, multinomial logistic regression analyses and generalised estimating equations. We will assess effect measure modification when relevant and conduct sensitivity analyses to assess the impact of lost to follow-up.

    PROTOCOL AMENDMENTS: Due to opportunity and timing of the study, with relevance to the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, this study further aims to address mental health problems, musculoskeletal pain and lifestyle in university students before and during the pandemic.

    ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The Sustainable UNiversity Life study was approved by the Swedish ethics authority (2019-03276; 2020-01449). Results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed research papers, reports, research conferences, student theses and stakeholder communications.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04465435.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6. Gravensteen, Ida Kathrine
    et al.
    Helgadóttir, Linda Björk
    Jacobsen, Eva-Marie
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Sandset, Per Morten
    Ekeberg, Oivind
    Women's experiences in relation to stillbirth and risk factors for long-term post-traumatic stress symptoms: a retrospective study2013In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 3, no 10, p. e003323-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: (1) To investigate the experiences of women with a previous stillbirth and their appraisal of the care they received at the hospital. (2) To assess the long-term level of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in this group and identify risk factors for this outcome.

    DESIGN: A retrospective study.

    SETTING: Two university hospitals.

    PARTICIPANTS: The study population comprised 379 women with a verified diagnosis of stillbirth (≥23 gestational weeks or birth weight ≥500 g) in a singleton or twin pregnancy 5-18 years previously. 101 women completed a comprehensive questionnaire in two parts.

    PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: The women's experiences and appraisal of the care provided by healthcare professionals before, during and after stillbirth. PTSS at follow-up was assessed using the Impact of Event Scale (IES).

    RESULTS: The great majority saw (98%) and held (82%) their baby. Most women felt that healthcare professionals were supportive during the delivery (85.6%) and showed respect towards their baby (94.9%). The majority (91.1%) had received some form of short-term follow-up. One-third showed clinically significant long-term PTSS (IES ≥ 20). Independent risk factors were younger age (OR 6.60, 95% CI 1.99 to 21.83), induced abortion prior to stillbirth (OR 5.78, 95% CI 1.56 to 21.38) and higher parity (OR 3.46, 95% CI 1.19 to 10.07) at the time of stillbirth. Having held the baby (OR 0.17, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.56) was associated with less PTSS.

    CONCLUSIONS: The great majority saw and held their baby and were satisfied with the support from healthcare professionals. One in three women presented with a clinically significant level of PTSS 5-18 years after stillbirth. Having held the baby was protective, whereas prior induced abortion was a risk factor for a high level of PTSS.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: The study was registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, with registration number NCT 00856076.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Radestad_20140221
  • 7. Holm, Lena W
    et al.
    Bohman, Tony
    Lekander, Mats
    Magnusson, C
    Skillgate, Eva
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Risk of transition from occasional neck/back pain to long-duration activity limiting neck/back pain: A cohort study on the influence of poor work ability and sleep disturbances in the working population in Stockholm County2020In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 10, no 6, article id e033946Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The prevalence of neck/back pain (NBP) is high worldwide. Limited number of studies have investigated workers with occasional NBP regarding the risk of developing long-duration activity limiting NBP (LNBP). The objectives were to assess (1) the effect of poor work ability and sleep disturbances in persons with occasional NBP on the risk of LNBP, and (2) the interaction effect of these exposures.

    DESIGN: Cohort study based on three subsamples from the Stockholm Public Health Cohort.

    SETTINGS: The working population in Stockholm County.

    PARTICIPANTS: Persons aged 18-60 years, reporting occasional NBP the past 6 months at baseline year 2010 (n=16 460).

    MEASURES: Work ability was assessed with items from the Work Ability Index, perceived mental and/or physical work ability. Sleep disturbances were self-reported current mild/severe disturbances. The outcome in year 2014 was reporting NBP the previous 6 months, occurring ≥couple of days per week and resulting in decreased work ability/restricted other daily activities. The additive effect of having both poor work ability and sleep disturbances was modelled with a dummy variable, including both exposures. Poisson log-linear regression was used to calculate risk ratios (RRs) and 95% CIs.

    RESULTS: At follow-up, 9% had developed LNBP. Poor work ability and sleep disturbances were independent risk factors for LNBP; adjusted RR 1.7 (95% CI: 1.4 to 2.0) and 1.4 (95% CI: 1.2 to 1.5), respectively. No additive interaction was observed.

    CONCLUSION: Workers with occasional NBP who have poor work ability and/or sleep disturbances are at risk of developing LNBP. Having both conditions does not exceed additive risk.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Johansson, Fred
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Billquist, Jessica
    Andreasson, Hanna
    Jensen, Irene
    Onell, Clara
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Berman, Anne H
    Skillgate, Eva
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Study environment and the incidence of mental health problems and activity-limiting musculoskeletal problems among university students: The SUN cohort study2023In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 9, article id e072178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between different aspects of study environment and the incidence of mental health problems and activity-limiting musculoskeletal problems.

    DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: We recruited a cohort of 4262 Swedish university students of whom 2503 (59%) were without moderate or worse mental health problems and 2871 (67%) without activity-limiting musculoskeletal problems at baseline. The participants were followed at five time points over 1 year using web surveys.

    EXPOSURES: Self-rated discrimination, high study pace, low social cohesion and poor physical environment measured at baseline.

    OUTCOMES: Self-rated mental health problems defined as scoring above cut-off on any of the subscales of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale. Self-rated activity-limiting musculoskeletal problems in any body location assessed by the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire.

    STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Discrete survival-time analysis was used to estimate the hazard rate ratio (HR) of each exposure-outcome combination while adjusting for gender, age, living situation, education type, year of studies, place of birth and parental education as potential confounders.

    RESULTS: For discrimination, adjusted HRs were 1.75 (95% CI 1.40 to 2.19) for mental health problems and 1.39 (95% CI 1.12 to 1.72) for activity-limiting musculoskeletal problems. For high study pace, adjusted HRs were 1.70 (95% CI 1.48 to 1.94) for mental health problems and 1.25 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.43) for activity-limiting musculoskeletal problems. For low social cohesion, adjusted HRs were 1.51 (95% CI 1.29 to 1.77) for mental health problems and 1.08 (95% CI 0.93 to 1.25) for activity-limiting musculoskeletal problems. For perceived poor physical study environment, adjusted HRs were 1.20 (95% CI 0.99 to 1.45) for mental health problems and 1.20 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.43) for activity-limiting musculoskeletal problems.

    CONCLUSIONS: Several aspects of the study environment were associated with the incidence of mental health problems and activity-limiting musculoskeletal problems in this sample of Swedish university students.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9. Lederman, Jakob
    et al.
    Lindström, Veronica
    Elmqvist, Carina
    Löfvenmark, Caroline
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Djärv, Therese
    Non-conveyance in the ambulance service: A population-based cohort study in Stockholm, Sweden2020In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 10, no 7, article id e036659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Non-conveyed patients represent a significant proportion of all patients cared for by ambulance services in the western world. However, scientific knowledge on non-conveyance is sparse. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of non-conveyance, investigate associations and compare patients' characteristics, drug administration, initial problems and vital signs between non-conveyed and conveyed patients.

    DESIGN: A population-based retrospective cohort study.

    SETTING: The study setting area, Stockholm, Sweden, has a population of 2.3 million inhabitants, with seven emergency hospitals. Annually, approximately 210 000 assignments are performed by 73 ambulances. All ambulance assignments performed from 1 January to 31 December 2015 were included.

    RESULTS: In total, 23 603 ambulance assignments ended in non-conveyance-13.8% of all ambulance assignments performed in 2015. Compared with conveyed patients, non-conveyed patients were younger and more often female (median age 50.1 years for non-conveyed vs 61.7 years for conveyed; female=52 %, both p values <0.001). Approximately half of all ambulance assignments ending in non-conveyance were initially prioritised and dispatched as the highest priority. Non-conveyed patients were more often assessed by ambulance clinicians as presenting non-specific symptoms or symptoms related to psychiatric problems. Low blood glucose levels were highly associated with non-conveyance (adjusted OR (AOR): 15; 95 % CI 11.18 to 20.13), although non-conveyed patients presented abnormal vital signs across all categories of vital signs. Moreover, drugs were more often administered to younger non-conveyed patients. Older patients were more often conveyed and administered drugs once conveyed (AOR: 1.29; 95 % CI 1.07 to 1.56).

    CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that non-conveyed patients represent a non-negligible proportion of all patients in contact with ambulance services. In general, most cases of non-conveyance occur at the highest dispatch level, to a large extent involve younger patients, and features problems assessed by ambulance clinicians as non-specific or related to psychiatric symptoms.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10. Lederman, Jakob
    et al.
    Löfvenmark, Caroline
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Djärv, Therese
    Lindström, Veronica
    Elmqvist, Carina
    Assessing non-conveyed patients in the ambulance service: a phenomenological interview study with Swedish ambulance clinicians2019In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 9, article id e030203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To combat overcrowding in emergency departments, ambulance clinicians (ACs) are being encouraged to make on-site assessments regarding patients' need for conveyance to hospital, and this is creating new and challenging demands for ACs. This study aimed to describe ACs' experiences of assessing non-conveyed patients.

    DESIGN: A phenomenological interview study based on a reflective lifeworld research approach.

    SETTING: The target area for the study was Stockholm, Sweden, which has a population of approximately 2.3 million inhabitants. In this area, 73 ambulances perform approximately just over 200 000 ambulance assignments annually, and approximately 25 000 patients are non-conveyed each year.

    INFORMANTS: 11 ACs.

    METHODS: In-depth open-ended interviews.

    RESULTS: ACs experience uncertainty regarding the accuracy of their assessments of non-conveyed patients. In particular, they fear conducting erroneous assessments that could harm patients. Avoiding hasty decisions is important for conducting safe patient assessments. Several challenging paradoxes were identified that complicate the non-conveyance situation, namely; responsibility, education and feedback paradoxes. The core of the responsibility paradox is that the increased responsibility associated with non-conveyance assessments is not accompanied with appropriate organisational support. Thus, frustration is experienced. The education paradox involves limited and inadequate non-conveyance education. This, in combination with limited support from non-conveyance guidelines, causes the clinical reality to be perceived as challenging and problematic. Finally, the feedback paradox relates to the obstruction of professional development as a result of an absence of learning possibilities after assessments. Additionally, ACs also described loneliness during non-conveyance situations.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that, for ACs, performing non-conveyance assessments means experiencing a paradoxical professional existence. Despite these aggravating paradoxes, however, complex non-conveyance assessments continue to be performed and accompanied with limited organisational support. To create more favourable circumstances and, hopefully, safer assessments, further studies that focus on these paradoxes and non-conveyance are needed.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11. Lundin, Åse
    et al.
    Ekman, Inger
    Wallström, Sara
    Andréll, Paulin
    Lundberg, Mari
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Suffering out of sight but not out of mind - interpreting experiences of sick leave due to chronic pain in a community setting: A qualitative study2023In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 4, p. e066617-, article id e066617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Chronic pain is a complex health problem affecting about one-fifth of the European population. It is a leading cause of years lived with disability worldwide, with serious personal, relational and socioeconomic consequences. Chronic pain and sick leave adversely affect health and quality of life. Thus, understanding this phenomenon is essential for reducing suffering, understanding the need for support and promoting a rapid return to work and an active lifestyle. This study aimed to describe and interpret persons' experiences of being on sick leave due to chronic pain.

    DESIGN: A qualitative study with semistructured interviews analysed using a phenomenological hermeneutic approach.

    SETTING: Participants were recruited from a community setting in Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: Fourteen participants (12 women) with experiences of part-time or full-time sick leave from work due to chronic pain were included in the study.

    RESULTS: Suffering out of sight but not out of mind was the main theme of the qualitative analysis. This theme implies that the participants' constant suffering was invisible to others, causing them to feel they were not being justly treated in society. Feeling overlooked led to a continuous struggle for recognition. Moreover, the participants' identities and their trust in themselves and their bodies were challenged. However, our study also revealed a nuanced understanding of the experiences of sick leave as a consequence of chronic pain, where the participants learnt important lessons, including coping strategies and re-evaluated priorities.

    CONCLUSIONS: Being on sick leave due to chronic pain threatens a person's integrity and leads to substantial suffering. An enhanced understanding of the meaning of sick leave due to chronic pain provides important considerations for their care and support. This study highlights the importance of feeling acknowledged and being met with justice in encounters with others.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12. Rasmussen, Mette
    et al.
    Larsson, Matz
    Gilljam, Hans
    Adami, Johanna
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Wärjerstam, Sanne
    Post, Ann
    Björk-Eriksson, Thomas
    Helgason, Asgeir R
    Tønnesen, Hanne
    Effectiveness of tobacco cessation interventions for different groups of tobacco users in Sweden: A study protocol for a national prospective cohort study2022In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 12, no 1, article id e053090Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Tobacco is still one of the single most important risk factors among the lifestyle habits that cause morbidity and mortality in humans. Furthermore, tobacco has a heavy social gradient, as the consequences are even worse among disadvantaged and vulnerable groups. To reduce tobacco-related inequity in health, those most in need should be offered the most effective tobacco cessation intervention. The aim of this study is to facilitate and improve the evaluation of already implemented national tobacco cessation efforts, focusing on 10 disadvantaged and vulnerable groups of tobacco users.

    METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This is a prospective cohort study. Data will be collected by established tobacco cessation counsellors in Sweden. The study includes adult tobacco or e-cigarette users, including disadvantaged and vulnerable patients, receiving in-person interventions for tobacco or e-cigarette cessation (smoking, snus and/or e-cigarettes). Patient inclusion was initiated in April 2020. For data analyses patients will be sorted into vulnerable groups based on risk factors and compared with tobacco users without the risk factor in question.The primary outcome is continuous successful quitting after 6 months, measured by self-reporting. Secondary outcomes include abstinence at the end of the treatment programme, which could be from minutes over days to weeks, 14-day point prevalence after 6 months, and patient satisfaction with the intervention. Effectiveness of successful quitting will be examined by comparing vulnerable with non-vulnerable patients using a mixed-effect logistic regression model adjusting for potential prognostic factors and known confounders.

    ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The project will follow the guidelines from the Swedish Data Protection Authority and have been approved by the Swedish Ethical Review Authority before patient inclusion (Dnr: 2019-02221). Only patients providing written informed consent will be included. Both positive and negative results will be published in scientific peer-reviewed journals and presented at national and international conferences. Information will be provided through media available to the public, politicians, healthcare providers and planners as these are all important stakeholders.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04819152.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Pettersson, Karin
    Lindgren, Helena
    Skokic, Viktor
    Akselsson, Anna
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Country of birth, educational level and other predictors of seeking care due to decreased fetal movements: An observational study in Sweden using data from a cluster-randomised controlled trial2021In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 11, no 6, article id e050621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To identify predictors of seeking care for decreased fetal movements and assess whether care-seeking behaviour is influenced by Mindfetalness.

    DESIGN: Observational study with data from a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    SETTING: 67 maternity clinics and 6 obstetrical clinics in Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: All pregnant women with a singleton pregnancy who contacted the obstetrical clinic due to decreased fetal movements from 32 weeks' gestation of 39 865 women.

    METHODS: Data were collected from a cluster-randomised controlled trial where maternity clinics were randomised to Mindfetalness or routine care. Mindfetalness is a self-assessment method for women to use daily to become familiar with the unborn baby's fetal movement pattern.

    OUTCOME MEASURES: Predictors for contacting healthcare due to decreased fetal movements.

    RESULTS: Overall, 5.2% (n=2059) of women contacted healthcare due to decreased fetal movements, among which 1287 women (62.5%) were registered at a maternity clinic randomised to Mindfetalness and 772 women (37.5%) were randomised to routine care. Predictors for contacting healthcare due to decreased fetal movements were age, country of birth, educational level, parity, prolonged pregnancy and previous psychiatric care (p<0.001). The main differences were seen among women born in Africa as compared with Swedish-born women (2% vs 6%, relative risk (RR) 0.34, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.44) and among women with low educational level compared with women with university-level education (2% vs 5.4%, RR 0.36, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.62). Introducing Mindfetalness in maternity care increased the number of women seeking care due to decreased fetal movements overall.

    CONCLUSION: Women with country of birth outside Sweden and low educational level sought care for decreased fetal movements to a lesser extent compared with women born in Sweden and those with university degrees. Future research could explore whether pregnancy outcomes can be improved by motivating women in these groups to contact healthcare if they feel a decreased strength or frequency of fetal movements.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02865759.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14. Svedbo Engström, Maria
    et al.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Borg, Sixten
    Palaszewski, Bo
    Franzén, Stefan
    Gudbjörnsdottir, Soffia
    Eeg-Olofsson, Katarina
    New Diabetes Questionnaire to add patients' perspectives to diabetes care for adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes: Nationwide cross-sectional study of construct validity assessing associations with generic health-related quality of life and clinical variables2020In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 10, no 11, article id e038966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To study evidence for construct validity, the aim was to describe the outcome from the recently developed Diabetes Questionnaire, assess the associations of that outcome with clinical variables and generic health-related quality of life, and study the sensitivity to differences between clinically relevant groups of glycaemic control in adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes in a nation-wide setting.

    DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey.

    SETTING: Swedish diabetes care clinics connected to the National Diabetes Register (NDR).

    PARTICIPANTS: Among 2479 adults with type 1 diabetes and 2469 with type 2 diabetes selected at random from the NDR, 1373 (55.4%) with type 1 and 1353 (54.8%) with type 2 diabetes chose to participate.

    OUTCOME MEASURES: The Diabetes Questionnaire, the generic 36-item Short Form version 2 (SF-36v2) health survey and clinical variables.

    RESULTS: Related to the prespecified assumptions, supporting evidence for construct validity for the Diabetes Questionnaire was found. Supporting divergent validity, the statistically significant correlations with the clinical variables were few and weak. In relation to the SF-36v2 and in support of convergent validity, the strongest correlations were seen in the Diabetes Questionnaire scales General Well-being and Mood and Energy. In those scales, machine learning analyses showed that about 40%-45% of the variance was explained by the SF-36v2 results and clinical variables. In multiple regression analyses among three groups with differing levels of glycated haemoglobin adjusted for demographics, other risk factors, and diabetes complications, the high-risk group had, in support of sensitivity to clinically relevant groups, statistically significant lower scores than the well-controlled group in most Diabetes Questionnaire scales.

    CONCLUSIONS: This nation-wide study shows that the Diabetes Questionnaire captures some generic health-related quality-of-life dimensions, in addition to adding diabetes-specific information not covered by the SF-36v2 and clinical variables. The Diabetes Questionnaire is also sensitive to differences between clinically relevant groups of glycaemic control.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15. Svedbo Engström, Maria
    et al.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Gudbjörnsdottir, Soffia
    What is important for you? A qualitative interview study of living with diabetes and experiences of diabetes care to establish a basis for a tailored Patient-Reported Outcome Measure for the Swedish National Diabetes Register2016In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: There is a growing emphasis on the perspective of individuals living with diabetes and the need for a more person-centred diabetes care. At present, the Swedish National Diabetes Register (NDR) lacks patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) based on the perspective of the patient. As a basis for a new PROM, the aim of this study was to describe important aspects in life for adult individuals with diabetes.

    DESIGN: Semistructured qualitative interviews analysed using content analysis.

    SETTING: Hospital-based outpatient clinics and primary healthcare clinics in Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: 29 adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) (n=15) and type 2 DM (n=14).

    INCLUSION CRITERIA: Swedish adults (≥18 years) living with type 1 DM or type 2 DM (duration ≥5 years) able to describe their situation in Swedish. Purposive sampling generated heterogeneous characteristics.

    RESULTS: To live a good life with diabetes is demanding for the individual, but experienced barriers can be eased by support from others in the personal sphere, and by professional support from diabetes care. Diabetes care was a crucial resource to nurture the individual's ability and knowledge to manage diabetes, and to facilitate life with diabetes by supplying support, guidance, medical treatment and technical devices tailored to individual needs. The analysis resulted in the overarching theme 'To live a good life with diabetes' constituting the two main categories 'How I feel and how things are going with my diabetes' and 'Support from diabetes care in managing diabetes' including five different categories.

    CONCLUSIONS: Common aspects were identified including the experience of living with diabetes and support from diabetes care. These will be used to establish a basis for a tailored PROM for the NDR.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16. Tranaeus, Ulrika
    et al.
    Weiss, Nathan
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Lyberg, Victor
    Hagglund, Martin
    Waldén, Markus
    Johnson, Urban
    Asker, Martin
    Skillgate, Eva
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Study protocol for a prospective cohort study identifying risk factors for sport injury in adolescent female football players: The Karolinska football Injury Cohort (KIC)2022In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 12, no 1, article id e055063Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Football is a popular sport among young females worldwide, but studies concerning injuries in female players are scarce compared with male players. The aim of this study is to identify risk factors for injury in adolescent female football players.

    METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The Karolinska football Injury Cohort (KIC) is an ongoing longitudinal study that will include approximately 400 female football academy players 12-19 years old in Sweden. A detailed questionnaire regarding demographics, health status, lifestyle, stress, socioeconomic factors, psychosocial factors and various football-related factors are completed at baseline and after 1 year. Clinical tests measuring strength, mobility, neuromuscular control of the lower extremity, trunk and neck are carried out at baseline. Players are followed prospectively with weekly emails regarding exposure to football and other physical activity, health issues (such as stress, recovery, etc), pain, performance and injuries via the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center Overuse Injury Questionnaire (OSTRC-O). Players who report a substantial injury in the OSTRC-O, that is, not being able to participate in football activities, or have reduced their training volume performance to a moderate or major degree, are contacted for full injury documentation. In addition to player data, academy coaches also complete a baseline questionnaire regarding coach experience and education.

    ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study was approved by the Regional Ethical Review Authority at Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden (2016/1251-31/4). All participating players and their legal guardians give their written informed consent. The study will be reported in accordance with the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology. The results will be published in peer-reviewed academic journals and disseminated to the Swedish football movement through stakeholders and media.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17. Venesoja, Anu
    et al.
    Tella, Susanna
    Castrén, Maaret
    Lindström, Veronica
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Finnish emergency medical services managers' and medical directors' perceptions of collaborating with patients concerning patient safety issues: A qualitative study2023In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 4, p. e067754-, article id e067754Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to describe emergency medical services (EMS) managers' and medical directors' perceptions of collaborating with patients concerning patient safety issues in the EMS.

    DESIGN: The study used a descriptive qualitative approach. Five focus groups and two individuals were interviewed using a semi-structured guide with open-ended questions. The data were analysed using reflexive thematic analysis. Consolidated criteria for Reporting Qualitative research was used to guide the reporting of this study.

    SETTING: EMS organisations from Finland's five healthcare districts.

    PARTICIPANTS: EMS medical directors (n=5) and EMS managers (n=14). Purposive sampling was used.

    RESULTS: Two main themes, 'Patient safety considered an organisational responsibility' and 'EMS patients' opportunities and obstacles to speaking up', were generated from the data. Under the main theme, 'Patient safety considered an organisational responsibility', were three subthemes: patient safety considered part of the quality in EMS, system-level models for handling and observing patient safety in EMS, and management's ability to find a balance when using patients' feedback for patient safety development. Under the other main theme were four subthemes: 'social and feedback skills of EMS personnel and management', 'managements' assumptions of patients' reasons for not speaking up', 'EMS organisations' different but unsystematic ways of collecting feedback' and 'management's openness to develop patient participation'.

    CONCLUSIONS: The nature of the EMS organisations and EMS assignments could affect a patient's participation in developing patient safety in EMS. However, EMS managers and medical directors are receptive to collaborating with patients concerning patient safety issues if they have sufficient resources and a coherent way to collect patient safety concerns. The management is open to collaborating with patients, but there is a need to develop a systematic method with enough resources to facilitate the management's collaborating with patients.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18. Östh, Josefine
    et al.
    Diwan, Vinod
    Jirwe, Maria
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Diwan, Vishal
    Choudhary, Anita
    Mahadik, Vijay Khanderao
    Pascoe, Michaela
    Hallgren, Mats
    Effects of yoga on well-being and healthy ageing: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial (FitForAge)2019In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 5, article id e027386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Due to ageing populations worldwide, the burden of disability is increasing. It is therefore important to develop interventions that improve healthy ageing, reduce disability onset and enhance life quality. Physical activity can promote healthy ageing and help maintain independence, yet many older adults are inactive. Yoga is a form of physical activity that aims to improve health and may be particularly suitable for older adults. Research indicates positive effects of yoga on several health-related outcomes; however, empirical studies examining the benefits of yoga on well-being among the elderly remain scarce. This study protocol reports the methodology for a 12-week yoga programme aimed to improve health and well-being among physically inactive older adults.

    METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Three group parallel, single-blind randomised controlled trial. Two comparison groups are included: aerobic exercise and a non-active wait-list control. In total, 180 participants aged 65-85 years will be recruited. Assessments will be performed at baseline and postintervention (12-week follow-up). The primary outcome is subjective well-being. Secondary outcomes include physical activity/sedentary behaviour, mobility/fall risk, cognition, depression, anxiety, mood, stress, pain, sleep quality, social support and cardiometabolic risk factors. Data will be analysed using intention-to-treat analyses, with mixed linear modelling.

    ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study is approved by the Ethical Review Board in Stockholm (2017/1862-31/2). All participants must voluntarily agree to participate and are free to withdraw from the study at any point. Written informed consent will be obtained from each participant prior to inclusion. Results will be available through research articles and conferences. A summary of key results will be publicly available through newspaper articles.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: DRKS00015093, U1111-1217-4248.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 18 of 18
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf