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  • 1. Flenady, Vicki
    et al.
    Ellwood, David
    Bradford, Billie
    Coory, Michael
    Middleton, Philippa
    Gardener, Glenn
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Homer, Caroline
    Davies-Tuck, Miranda
    Forster, Della
    Gordon, Adrienne
    Groom, Katie
    Crowther, Caroline
    Walker, Sue
    Foord, Claire
    Warland, Jane
    Murphy, Margaret
    Said, Joanne
    Boyle, Fran
    O'Donoghue, Keelin
    Cronin, Robin
    Sexton, Jessica
    Weller, Megan
    McCowan, Lesley
    Beyond the headlines: Fetal movement awareness is an important stillbirth prevention strategy2018In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, article id S1871-5192(18)31666-4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Linde, Anders
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Pettersson, Karin
    Hagelberg, Linn
    Georgsson, Susanne
    Sophiahemmet University.
    "Better safe than sorry"-Reasons for consulting care due to decreased fetal movements2017In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 376-381, article id S1871-5192(17)30074-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Experience of reduced fetal movements is a common reason for consulting health care in late pregnancy. There is an association between reduced fetal movements and stillbirth.

    AIM: To explore why women decide to consult health care due to reduced fetal movements at a specific point in time and investigate reasons for delaying a consultation.

    METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed at all birth clinics in Stockholm during 2014, to women seeking care due to reduced fetal movements. In total, 3555 questionnaires were collected, 960 were included in this study. The open-ended question; "Why, specifically, do you come to the clinic today?" was analyzed using content analysis as well as the complementary question "Are there any reasons why you did not come to the clinic earlier?"

    RESULTS: Five categories were revealed: Reaching dead line, Receiving advice from health care professionals, Undergoing unmanageable worry, Contributing external factors and Not wanting to jeopardize the health of the baby. Many women stated that they decided to consult care when some time with reduced fetal movements had passed. The most common reason for not consulting care earlier was that it was a new experience. Some women stated that they did not want to feel that they were annoying, or be perceived as excessively worried. Not wanting to burden health care unnecessarily was a reason for prehospital delay.

    CONCLUSION: Worry about the baby is the crucial reason for consulting care as well as the time which has passed since the women first experienced decreased fetal movements.

  • 3. Listermar, Karin Henley
    et al.
    Sormunen, Taina
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Perinatal palliative care after a stillbirth: Midwives' experiences of using Cubitus baby2019In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, article id S1871-5192(19)30081-2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Usually, parents remain at the hospital for two or three days after a stillbirth in Sweden, and the routine until recently has been to place the baby in a refrigerator during the night. A device, the Cubitus Baby, a specially designed cot with cooling blocks, was implemented in all 47 delivery wards during 2013 and 2014.

    AIM: To investigate the midwives' experiences of using the device when supporting parents after the stillbirth.

    METHOD: Questionnaires were completed by midwives, and a single open-ended question was analysed using content analysis.

    FINDINGS: 154 midwives responded. Four categories were identified, with two subgroups in each category: Feelings of dignity (Satisfactory feelings in working with grief; Design and function), Caring cooling (The cooling function; A cold baby), Time for farewell (Time together; Time to make your own choice) and Satisfying feelings for the parents (The parents and Cubitus Baby; The possibility for bonding).

    CONCLUSIONS: The midwives found that this practice provided a more dignified and worthwhile form of care. There is no need to separate the stillborn baby from the parents during their stay at the hospital. In modern perinatal palliative care, it is not justifiable to place a stillborn baby in a refrigerator.

  • 4. Malm, Mari-Cristin
    et al.
    Hildingsson, Ingegerd
    Rubertsson, Christine
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Prenatal attachment and its association with foetal movement during pregnancy - A population based survey2016In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 482-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between the magnitude of foetal movements and level of prenatal attachment within a 24h period among women in the third trimester of pregnancy.

    DESIGN: a prospective population-based survey.

    SETTING: A county in central Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: Low risk pregnant women from 34 to 42 weeks gestation, N=456, 299 multiparous and 157 primiparous women.

    MEASUREMENTS: The revised version of the Prenatal Attachment Inventory (PAI-R) and assessment of the perception of foetal movements per 24h in the current gestational week.

    FINDINGS: A total of 81 per cent of the eligible women completed the questionnaire. The overall sample of women found that the majority (96%) felt their baby move mostly in the evening. More than half of the respondents (55%) stated that they perceived frequent foetal movement on two occasions during a 24h period, while almost a fifth (18%) never or only once reported frequent foetal movement in a 24h period. Just over a quarter (26%) of respondents perceived frequent movement at least three times during a 24h period. Perceiving frequent foetal movements on three or more occasions during a 24h period, was associated with higher scores of prenatal attachment in all the three subscales.

    KEY CONCLUSION: Perceiving frequent foetal movements at least during three occasions per 24h periods in late pregnancy was associated with prenatal attachment.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: encouraging women to focus on foetal movements may positively affect prenatal attachment, especially among multiparous women >35 years.

  • 5. Sjödin, Marie
    et al.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Zwedberg, Sofia
    A qualitative study showing women's participation and empowerment in instrumental vaginal births2018In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 31, no 3, p. e185-e189, article id S1871-5192(17)30525-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: An instrumental birth with a ventouse or forceps is a complicated birth, possibly resulting in fear of childbirth which could influence the entire birth experience negatively. Patients who are actively involved in their care have a stronger sense of satisfaction and a sense of participation can contribute to shorter hospital stays.

    AIM: To describe the experience of participation for women involved in an instrumental delivery with ventouse or forceps.

    METHOD: Qualitative semi-structured interviews with 16 women who gave birth aided by a ventouse or forceps. Their answers were analyzed through qualitative content analysis. In addition the women were asked to evaluate their experience during the delivery. Using a numerical scale (NRS) the birth experience was graded by choosing a number between 0 (worst possible experience) and 10 (best conceivable experience).

    FINDINGS: Two themes were extracted from the data: To be part of a team and To feel empowered. Five categories were identified from the women's descriptions of the experience of involvement during the instrumental delivery: to cooperate; to understand; to have contact; to participate, and to not be involved. Those women who rated their experience as low grade, described a lack of involvement in their childbirth compared to those women who rated their experience as high.

    CONCLUSION: This study shows how cooperation and empowerment of the woman are two key factors in order for the women to have a positive experience of their instrumental vaginal births. The study also shows that empowerment is created when the woman is actively engaged and participates in the birth process which gives her the feeling of being part of the team, creating an environment based on mutual understanding.

  • 6.
    Ulfsdottir, Hanna
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Saltvedt, Sissel
    Georgsson, Susanne
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Testing the waters: A cross-sectional survey of views about waterbirth among Swedish health professionals2019In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, article id S1871-5192(18)31645-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: For women with low risk births, waterbirth is an alternative that is requested and provided in approximately a hundred countries. However, in some countries, including Sweden, waterbirth is not generally available.

    AIM: To explore the experiences, knowledge and attitudes regarding waterbirth among midwives, obstetricians/gynaecologists and neonatologists.

    METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Sweden, using a web-based survey distributed via The Swedish Association of Midwives and the Heads of department of all Swedish maternity wards between April and June 2016. The respondents (n = 1609) answered a combination of Likert-scale and open-ended questions. The responses were analysed with descriptive statistics and quantitative content analyses.

    FINDINGS: Both midwives and physicians stated a lack of experience, knowledge and clinical guidelines related to attending and assisting waterbirths. Overall, midwives had more positive attitudes to waterbirth (38.8% vs 4.5%) as well as towards providing and implementing waterbirth, compared to physicians (71.0% vs 14.9%). Midwives stated significantly more benefits and fewer risks for women and babies, compared to physicians who requested more evidence.

    CONCLUSIONS: Opinions regarding waterbirth are to some extent based on attitudes rather than actual experience and knowledge. There are diverse interpretations of the strength of evidence and a lack of updating in the research field of waterbirth. As waterbirth is requested by women, health professionals need to update their knowledge in this topic in order to give coherent and evidence-based information and care to prospective parents.

  • 7. Åhlund, Susanne
    et al.
    Zwedberg, Sofia
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Hildingsson, Ingegerd
    Edqvist, Malin
    Lindgren, Helena
    Midwives experiences of participating in a midwifery research project: A qualitative study2018In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 31, no 2, p. e115-e121, article id S1871-5192(17)30140-3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PROBLEM AND BACKGROUND: In an earlier research project midwives were asked to perform women-centered care focusing on the assumption that the physiological process in the second stage of labour could be trusted and that the midwives role should be encouraging and supportive rather than instructing. There is no knowledge about how midwives participating in such a research project, uses their skills and experience from the study in their daily work.

    AIM: The aim in this study was to investigate how midwives experienced implementing woman-centered care during second stage of labour.

    METHODS: A qualitative study was designed. Three focus groups and two interviews were conducted. The material was analysed using content analysis.

    FINDINGS: The participating midwives' experiences were understood as increased awareness of their role as midwives. The overarching theme covers three categories 1) establishing a new way of working, 2) developing as midwife, 3) being affected by the prevailing culture. The intervention was experienced as an opportunity to reflect and strengthen their professional role, and made the midwives see the women and the birth in a new perspective.

    CONCLUSIONS: Implementing woman-centered care during second stage of labour gave the midwives an opportunity to develop in their professional role, and to enhance their confidence in the birthing women and her ability to have a physiological birth. To promote participation in, as well as conduct midwifery research, can enhance the development of the midwives professional role as well as contribute new knowledge to the field.

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  • nn-NO
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  • Other locale
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  • text
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