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  • 1. Avelin, Pernilla
    et al.
    Gyllenswärd, Göran
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Adolescents' experiences of having a stillborn half-sibling2014In: Death Studies, ISSN 0748-1187, E-ISSN 1091-7683, Vol. 38, no 9, p. 557-562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although there is an increasing interest in siblings' experiences of loss and grief there is limited knowledge of adolescent's own perspectives, especially in a unique situation as after stillbirth in a reconstituted family. The authors interviewed 13 bereaved adolescents. They were sad that their family was not the same and expressed feelings of being inside family grief, yet outside, because they did not have full access in their reconstituted family. An implication of present findings is that it is important to include all the members of the family in the grieving process, even half-siblings of the deceased child.

  • 2.
    Holm, Maja
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Öhlen, Joakim
    Alvariza, Anette
    Variations in grief, anxiety, depression, and health among family caregivers before and after the death of a close person in the context of palliative home care2019In: Death Studies, ISSN 0748-1187, E-ISSN 1091-7683, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates longitudinal variations in grief, self-rated health, and symptoms of anxiety and depression among family caregivers in palliative care. Data were taken from a randomized psycho-educational intervention trial and were collected at four time-points; at baseline, upon completion, 2 months later, and 6 months after the patient's death. In total, 117 family caregivers completed all questionnaires. The participants' grief was stable across the measurements, while anxiety, depression, and health varied significantly (p < 0.05). No significant differences were found between the intervention or control group. In conclusion, grief emerged as a constant phenomenon, distinct from symptoms of anxiety and depression.

  • 3. Jalmsell, Li
    et al.
    Kontio, Taru
    Stein, Maria
    Henter, Jan-Inge
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Sophiahemmet University.
    On the child's own initiative: parents communicate with their dying child about death2015In: Death Studies, ISSN 0748-1187, E-ISSN 1091-7683, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 111-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Open and honest communication has been identified as an important factor in providing good palliative care. However, there is no easy solution to if, when and how parents and a dying child should communicate about death. This paper reports how bereaved parents communicated about death with their child, dying from a malignancy. Communication was often initiated by the child and included communication through narratives such as fairy-tales and movies and talking more directly about death itself. Parents also reported that their child prepared for death by giving instructions about his or her grave or funeral and giving away toys.

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Citation style
  • apa
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  • Other style
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  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
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