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Medical-surgical nurses' experiences of calling a rapid response team in a hospital setting: a literature review
Sophiahemmet University.
Sophiahemmet University.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7935-3260
Sophiahemmet University.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5948-5047
2015 (English)In: Middle East Journal of Nursing, ISSN 1834-8742, Vol. 9, no 3, 3-23 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The rapid response team (RRT) decreases rates of mortality and morbidity in hospital and decreases the number of patient readmissions to the intensive care unit. This team helps patients before they have any signs of deterioration related to cardiac or pulmonary arrest. The aim of the RRT is to accelerate recognition and treatment of a critically ill patient. In addition, in order to be ready to spring into action without delay, the RRT must be on site and accessible, with good skills and training for emergency cases. It has been reported that many hospitals are familiar with the concept of RRTs. There is a difference between this team and a cardiac arrest team, since the RRT intervenes before a patient experiences cardiac or respiratory arrest.

Aim: To describe current knowledge about medical-surgical nurses' experiences when they call an RRT to save patients' lives.

Method: The method used by the author was a literature review. The PubMed search database was used and 15 articles were selected, all of which were primary academic studies. Articles were analysed and classified according to specified guidelines; only articles of grades I and II were included.

Results: Years of experience and qualifications characterise the ability of a medical-surgical nurse to decide whether or not to call the RRT. Knowledge and skills are also important; some hospitals provide education about RRTs, while others do not. Teamwork between bedside nurses and RRTs is effective in ensuring quality care. There are some challenges that might affect the outcome of patient care: The method of communication is particularly important in highlighting what nurses need RRTS to do in order to have fast intervention.

Conclusion: Medical-surgical nurses call RRTs to help save patients' lives, and depend on their experience when they call RRTs. Both medical-surgical nurses and RRTs need to collaborate during the delivery of care to the patient. Good knowledge and communication skills are important in delivering fast intervention to a critically ill patient, so that deteriorating clinical signs requiring intervention can be identified.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 9, no 3, 3-23 p.
Keyword [en]
Medical-surgical nurse, Rapid response team, Experiences, Challenges, Hospital
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-1954OAI: oai:DiVA.org:shh-1954DiVA: diva2:847926
Available from: 2015-08-21 Created: 2015-08-21 Last updated: 2016-02-05Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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