shh.sePublikationer
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Striving for control in eating situations after stroke
Sophiahemmet University College.
Show others and affiliations
2010 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 24, no 4, 772-80 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

UNLABELLED: THE STUDY'S RATIONALE: Eating difficulties are common after stroke. However, to better meet individuals' needs, in terms of care, support and rehabilitation after stroke, it was considered important to know more about how patients with stroke experience their eating difficulties while in process of regaining their ability.

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to explore the experience of eating difficulties among patients with stroke 3 months after stroke onset. METHODOLOGICAL DESIGN AND JUSTIFICATION: A qualitative interpretive descriptive approach was used. The analysis was based on constant comparative approach, using the principles of grounded theory.

RESEARCH METHODS: The study included 14 participants with stroke and eating difficulties. A semi-structured interview guide with open-ended questions and probes was used. The interview guide was gradually modified during the data collection process. The interviews were digital audio recorded and fully transcribed. Memos were documented simultaneously with the analysis. Instruments:  A structured observation of a meal verified eating difficulties, and semi-structured interviews were conducted.

RESULTS: 'Striving for control' emerged as a tentative core category. The participants related their striving for control to 'eating safely', and 'eating properly'; they also had to analyse the consequences of their eating difficulties, being careful when eating, and/or avoiding activities. Some also felt a need of help from others. Those others could remind and provide advice in this matter.

CONCLUSION: This study highlights the complexity of having eating difficulties after stroke. Aspects related to the participants' striving for control are based on different strategies to eat safely and properly. Nurses can use this knowledge to support patients in their strive for control by observing them in eating situations. In addition, nurses can also ask them to describe and make explicit the experience of eating situations after stroke.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 24, no 4, 772-80 p.
Keyword [en]
Eating difficulties, Experiences, Constant comparative analysis, Stroke
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-850DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-6712.2010.00775.xPubMedID: 20409051OAI: oai:DiVA.org:shh-850DiVA: diva2:445850
Available from: 2011-10-05 Created: 2011-10-05 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed
By organisation
Sophiahemmet University College
In the same journal
Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Nursing

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 47 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf