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Effect of respirators equipped with particle or particle-and-gas filters during exposure in a pig confinement building
Sophiahemmet University.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8101-9915
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2006 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, Vol. 32, no 2, 145-53 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: This study compared the protective effect of two respiratory protection devices during exposure in a pig confinement building. METHODS: Thirty-six healthy persons were exposed for 3 hours in the building, 12 without any protection, 12 with a particle-filter mask, and 12 with a mask filtering both particles and gases. Symptoms, body temperature, nasal lavage fluid, exhaled nitric oxide, and bronchial responsiveness to methacholine were assessed before and after the exposure. Pre- and postexposure urine and blood samples were collected. RESULTS: After the exposure, the participants with respirators reported fewer symptoms than those without. Wearing a mask also reduced the inflammatory response assessed with nasal lavage (cell concentration, interleukins 6 and 8) and peripheral blood (cell number). Lung function was significantly impaired only in the unprotected group; postexposure vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second showed a decrease of 3-4% from the preexposure levels (P=0.006 and P=0.002, respectively). Bronchial responsiveness (P<0.01) and body temperature (P<0.001) increased similarly in the three groups. Bronchial responsiveness to methacholine increased 2.7, 2.4, and 2.1 doubling concentration steps for those unprotected, those using a particle-filter mask, and those using a mask with particle and gas filters, respectively. The prostaglandin D2 metabolite, 9a, 11b-PGF2 increased significantly (P=0.003) only in those unprotected. CONCLUSIONS: Wearing a respirator in a pig confinement building reduces the inflammatory reaction but does not influence the increase in bronchial responsiveness, with no difference between the use of a particle-filter mask or a mask with a particle-gas filter combination.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 32, no 2, 145-53 p.
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Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-61PubMedID: 16680385OAI: oai:DiVA.org:shh-61DiVA: diva2:301315
Available from: 2010-03-03 Created: 2010-02-23 Last updated: 2014-10-15Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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