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What kind of self-care strategies do people report using and is there an association with well-being?
Sophiahemmet University.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6109-1992
Sophiahemmet University.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0971-5283
2005 (English)In: Social Indicators Research, ISSN 0303-8300, E-ISSN 1573-0921, Vol. 73, no 1, 133-39 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe what kind of self-care strategies people report using to improve or maintain their well-being. Furthermore, we also wanted to investigate whether reports of using self-care strategies were associated with well-being. Methods: A selected sample (n = 871), aged between 20 and 64 years, living in Stockholm County, answered an open-ended question about self-care strategies. Well-being was assessed using the WHO (Ten) well-being index. Results: Ten different categories were found. The most commonly reported self-care strategy was physical exercise, followed by social support and engaging in pleasurable activities. Physical exercise, social support, relaxation, and physical health were associated with a better well-being, social support being strongest correlated. Conclusion: The results suggest that reports of using certain self-care strategies are associated with a better well-being

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005. Vol. 73, no 1, 133-39 p.
Keyword [en]
Mental health, Self-care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-44DOI: 10.1007/s11205-004-0995-3OAI: oai:DiVA.org:shh-44DiVA: diva2:301098
Available from: 2010-03-02 Created: 2010-02-22 Last updated: 2014-12-03Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Subjective Well-being in an Adult Swedish Population: Findings from a Population-based Study
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Subjective Well-being in an Adult Swedish Population: Findings from a Population-based Study
2009 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This doctoral thesis examines various factors associated with subjective well-being (SWB) in an adult Swedish population, aged 20-64 years, using cross-sectional and longitudinal data. The thesis includes four studies based on the PART study, a current population-based study on mental health, work, and relations in Stockholm County, Sweden. Research has shown that there is a relationship between mental health problems such as depression and low well-being. It is therefore of great interest to investigate various factors associated with SWB in order to promote or increase mental health. We also examined if the well-being scale used in all studies could be used as a screening instrument for depression.

The specific aim of Study I was to examine if age, gender, foreign background (i.e. not born in Sweden), cohabitation, education, financial strain, social support, childhood conditions and negative life events and their associations with SWB could be replicated in our data. In Study II we investigated strategies people chose to employ in order to improve or maintain their well-being and whether these were associated with SWB. Study III examined if changes in cohabiting, social support or the financial situation influenced SWB, after controlling for neuroticism at a 3-year follow-up. The change in the study sample’s SWB was also studied during the same time period. In Study IV the aim was to investigate whether the well-being scale, the (WHO) Ten Well-being index, could be used as a screening instrument for depression.

Results from Study I showed that men had higher SWB than women, and that positive childhood conditions, cohabiting, greater age, sound financial situation, absence of negative life events, and support from friends were all positively associated with SWB. Social support had the strongest relationship. Together, these factors explained 20 % of the variance in SWB and the findings replicated earlier research. The strategies reported in Study II were physical exercise, physical health,engaging in pleasurable activities, relaxation, plan/set limits, social support, professional contacts, positive thinking, and work. Of these, social support, relaxation, physical exercise and physical health were associated with higher SWB. Social support showed the strongest association. In Study III changes in financial situation, social support, or cohabiting influenced SWB after controlling for neuroticism. The results also suggested that SWB was relatively stable over a period of three years. Preliminary findings from Study IV indicate that the (WHO) Ten Well-being index can work as a screening instrument for depression in populationbased samples.

In summary, the findings suggest that demographics and psychosocial factors explain only a small part of the variance in SWB, replicating previous data. Certain self-care strategies are positively associated with SWB. In addition, changes in life circumstances influence SWB, even after controlling for neuroticism over a period of three years despite the stability of SWB. Furthermore, the preliminary findings indicate that the well-being scale can work as a screening instrument for depression in a population-based sample. The overall conclusion from the results of this thesis suggests that it is important for the health care services to be aware that negative life events/circumstances may affect people’s SWB over several years. Furthermore, selfhelp interventions might be important in order to maintain or increase SWB.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Karolinska Institutet, 2009. 46 p.
Keyword
Subjective well-being, Depression, Life circumstances, Follow-up, Population-based
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-136 (URN)978-91-7409-275-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2009-01-30, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2010-04-27 Created: 2010-03-12 Last updated: 2016-06-09Bibliographically approved

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