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Communication patterns in nurse-led chemotherapy clinics: A mixed-method study
Sophiahemmet University.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6575-4626
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2020 (English)In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, article id S0738-3991(20)30103-8Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To determine patterns of nurse-patient communication in fulfilling patients' informational/psychosocial needs, effects of longer consultation/operational aspects on person-centred care experiences.

METHODS: Mixed-method design; secondary analysis of transcripts of nurse-patient communication within nurse-led chemotherapy clinics in UK [3]. Purposive sampling (13 nurses); non-participant observations (61 consultations). Qualitative content analysis of audio-recorded transcripts. Quantitative analysis using the Medical Interview Aural Rating Scale [14] to compare mean differences in the number of cues and level of responding using one-way ANOVA, and correlational analyses of discursive spaces.

RESULTS: Nurses responded positively to informational cues, but not psychosocial cues. Longer consultations associated with more informational and psychosocial cues (p <  .0001), but not nurses' cue-responding behaviours. Four main themes emerged: challenges/opportunities for person-centred communication in biomedical contexts; patients' "life world" versus the "medical world"; three-way communication: nurse, patient and family; implications of continuity of care.

CONCLUSIONS: The challenges/opportunities for cue-responding in nurse-led chemotherapy clinics were evident for informational and psychosocial support of patients. Shifting from a biomedical to biopsychosocial focus is difficult.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Further evaluation is needed to integrate biopsychosocial elements into communication education/training. Careful planning is required to ensure continuity and effective use of time for person-centred care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2020. article id S0738-3991(20)30103-8
Keywords [en]
Continuity of care, Cue-responding behaviours, Family dynamics, Nurse-led chemotherapy clinics, Nurse-patient communication, Patient-centred care, Psychosocial needs
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Nursing
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URN: urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-3617DOI: 10.1016/j.pec.2020.02.032PubMedID: 32127234OAI: oai:DiVA.org:shh-3617DiVA, id: diva2:1412627
Available from: 2020-03-06 Created: 2020-03-06 Last updated: 2020-03-06Bibliographically approved

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