shh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Deep tissue massage, strengthening and stretching exercises, and a combination of both compared with advice to stay active for subacute or persistent non-specific neck pain: A cost-effectiveness analysis of the Stockholm Neck trial (STONE)
Show others and affiliations
2020 (English)In: Musculoskeletal science & practice, ISSN 2468-7812, Vol. 46, article id 102109Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of deep tissue massage ('massage'), strengthening and stretching exercises ('exercises') or a combination of both ('combined therapy') in comparison with advice to stay active ('advice') for subacute and persistent neck pain, from a societal perspective.

METHODS: We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis alongside a four-arm randomized controlled trial of 619 participants followed-up for one year. Health-related quality of life was measured using EQ-5D-3L and costs were calculated from baseline to one year. The interventions were ranked according to quality adjusted life years (QALYs) in a cost-consequence analysis. Thereafter, an incremental cost per QALY was calculated.

RESULTS: In the cost-consequence analysis, in comparison with advice, exercises resulted in higher QALY gains, and massage and the combined therapy were more costly and less beneficial. Exercises may be a cost-effective treatment compared with advice to stay active if society is willing to pay 17 640 EUR per QALY. However, differences in QALY gains were minimal; on average, participants in the massage group, spent a year in a state of health valued at 0.88, exercises: 0.89, combined therapy: 0.88 and, advice: 0.88.

CONCLUSIONS: Exercises are cost-effective compared to advice given that the societal willingness to pay is above 17 640 EUR per year in full health gained. Massage and a combined therapy are not cost-effective. While exercise appeared to have the best cost/benefit profile, even this treatment had only a modest benefit and treatment innovation is needed. Advice to stay active remains as a good therapeutic alternative from an economical perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2020. Vol. 46, article id 102109
Keywords [en]
Complementary therapies, Cost-effectiveness, Health economic evaluation, Medical economics, Neck pain, Quality adjusted life years
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-3588DOI: 10.1016/j.msksp.2020.102109PubMedID: 31989965OAI: oai:DiVA.org:shh-3588DiVA, id: diva2:1394261
Available from: 2020-02-18 Created: 2020-02-18 Last updated: 2020-02-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Skillgate, Eva
By organisation
Sophiahemmet University
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 6 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
v. 2.35.9
|