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Outcome evaluation of highly challenging balance training for people with Parkinson disease: a multicenter effectiveness-implementation study
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy, ISSN 1557-0576, E-ISSN 1557-0584, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 15-22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In order for people with Parkinson disease (PwPD) to benefit from neurorehabilitation research, interventions tested in research settings require assessment in real-world clinical practice. There is little evidence for whether efficacious exercise interventions for PwPD remain effective when transferred to standard clinical settings. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical effectiveness of the adapted HiBalance program on balance control and gait among PwPD.

METHODS: Participants (n = 117) with mild-moderate Parkinson disease were consecutively included into either the 10-week HiBalance group training (n = 61) or the control (n = 56) group. The main outcome was balance performance (Mini-BESTest). Secondary outcomes were comfortable gait speed (10-m Walk Test); functional mobility (Timed Up and Go [TUG] test) and dual-task interference (cognitive TUG test); physical activity level (steps per day); perceived balance confidence (Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale) and perceived walking difficulty (Walk-12G) and self-rated health (EQ-5D visual analog scale).

RESULTS: In total, 98 people completed the trial. Compared with controls, the training group showed significant improvement in balance performance (P < 0.001), gait speed (P = 0.001), and dual-task interference (P = 0.04) following the intervention. No group differences were observed for physical activity level or any patient-reported measures.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: Highly challenging balance training is effective at improving balance, gait, and dual-task performance when delivered at a clinically feasible dose, in a range of rehabilitation settings, without direct involvement of the research group.Video Abstract available for more insights from the authors (see the Video, Supplementary Digital Content 1, available at: http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A299).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2020. Vol. 44, no 1, p. 15-22
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Physiotherapy
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URN: urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-3584DOI: 10.1097/NPT.0000000000000298PubMedID: 31834166OAI: oai:DiVA.org:shh-3584DiVA, id: diva2:1392998
Available from: 2020-02-14 Created: 2020-02-14 Last updated: 2020-02-14Bibliographically approved

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Hagströmer, Maria
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