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Newly-graduated nurses' experiences of a trainee programme regarding the introduction process and leadership in a hospital setting: a qualitative interview study
Sophiahemmet University.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1372-7757
Sophiahemmet University.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6331-8599
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 28, no 9-10, p. 1685-1694Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM AND OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to describe newly-graduated nurses' experiences of introduction processes and leadership within a hospital trainee programme.

BACKGROUND: For many, being a newly-graduated nurse is associated with stress, influenced by the challenge of the transition to independent nurse, coupled with the loss of mentorship due to nurse turnover and rapidly changing demands.

METHODS: A qualitative design with an inductive approach was chosen and four focus groups were convened. A total of nineteen nurses were included in the study. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. COREQ was used as EQUATOR checklist.

FINDINGS: The analysis resulted in three themes: Need for an introduction when facing a complex reality, Striving to stand on my own, and The importance of having an accessible and multi-skilled manager. The transition is a complex, dynamic and demanding process.

CONCLUSIONS: The orientation process from student to becoming an independent nurse is a challenging period. A flexible manager and a readily accessible leadership facilitate the newly-graduated nurse's striving to become an independent nurse. The study demonstrates that a trainee programme and support are essential in this process. There are indications that today's newly-graduated nurses have high expectations of coaching from the manager during the orientation process.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The hospital setting and its organisation are rapidly changing in relation to the increasing number of patients and their health status. In addition, there is a need for newly-graduated nurses to secure regrowth, to fill the ranks of experienced nurses leaving the field. Newly-graduated nurses increasingly perceive a gap between their training and clinical realities, thus necessitating changes in tutoring and their introduction to the work. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 28, no 9-10, p. 1685-1694
Keywords [en]
Newly-graduated nurses, hospital setting, introduction, manager, trainee, transition
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-3191DOI: 10.1111/jocn.14733PubMedID: 30552783OAI: oai:DiVA.org:shh-3191DiVA, id: diva2:1273136
Available from: 2018-12-20 Created: 2018-12-20 Last updated: 2019-04-25Bibliographically approved

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Gellerstedt, LindaBergkvist, KarinGransjön Craftman, Åsa
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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