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Andreassen Gleissman, SisselORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9929-4779
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Publications (10 of 15) Show all publications
Wijk, I., Amsberg, S., Andreassen Gleissman, S., Toft, E., Anderbro, T. & Johansson, U.-B. (2023). Living with type 1 diabetes as experienced by adults with prolonged elevated HbA1c: A qualitative study. Diabetes Therapy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Living with type 1 diabetes as experienced by adults with prolonged elevated HbA1c: A qualitative study
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2023 (English)In: Diabetes Therapy, ISSN 1869-6953, E-ISSN 1869-6961Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: High HbA1c levels in type 1 diabetes (T1D) are associated with increased risk of micro- and macrovascular complications and severe diabetes distress. A more comprehensive understanding of the adult perspective of living with T1D can improve the quality of care. We aimed to describe experiences of living with T1D as an adult with prolonged elevated HbA1c.

METHODS: Thirteen adults with T1D and HbA1c > 60 mmol/mol (7.6%) for at least 1 year were individually interviewed via a digital platform. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

RESULTS: The analysis identified an overarching theme, "a lifelong follower", and generated two main categories describing study participants' experience: constraining and manageable. Constraining experiences were explained in obligated control, loss of control, environmental impact, and consequences of diabetes. Manageable experiences were described in everyday life, approach to diabetes, and support in life. Diabetes knowledge in health care and in the general public, and individualized care were important factors in feeling understood, safe, and supported.

CONCLUSIONS: The findings revealed the diverse experiences of adults with prolonged elevated HbA1c. Living with T1D, a lifelong non-chosen follower, could be perceived as constraining but manageable in different degrees. A person-centered care approach addressing both dimensions may be beneficial. Experiences of living with and managing diabetes are multifaceted and intertwined with life context and medical prerequisites.

Keywords
Adults, Content analysis, Experiences, HbA1c, Qualitative research, Type 1 diabetes
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-4996 (URN)10.1007/s13300-023-01443-z (DOI)37470946 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-09-06 Created: 2023-09-06 Last updated: 2023-10-02Bibliographically approved
Skogö Nyvang, J., Hedström, M., Iversen, M. D. & Andreassen Gleissman, S. (2019). Striving for a silent knee: A qualitative study of patients' experiences with knee replacement surgery and their perceptions of fulfilled expectations. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 14(1), Article ID 1620551.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Striving for a silent knee: A qualitative study of patients' experiences with knee replacement surgery and their perceptions of fulfilled expectations
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 1620551Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Fifteen to twenty percent of patients with a knee arthroplasty are dissatisfied with their replaced joint. This study aimed to describe patients' experiences of undergoing knee replacement surgery, both total- and unicompartmental knee replacement, and post-operative recovery, and to determine whether expectations of surgery were fulfilled. Methods: Using semi-structured interviews, this study describes twelve patients' experiences of undergoing knee replacement surgery in the prior year, their post-operative recovery, and whether their expectations of surgery were fulfilled. Qualitative thematic analysis was used. Results: A theme "striving for a silent knee", and two categories "the bumpy road to recovery" and "the presence of the future" were created. Some participants were not fully restored one year after surgery. Those still in pain had thoughts about the future, from hoping to improve, to accepting living with an aching knee. Those with no pain, did not think about their knee-the knee had become silent. Conclusions: Surgeons often inform patients that the recovery time after a knee arthroplasty is one year, which in light of this study, might be too short. We suggest that a follow-up after one year might identify those who need enhanced physical and psychological support to get the best possible outcome, whether it is to help patients accepting persistent symptoms or to continue striving towards a silent knee.

Keywords
Knee arthroplasty, experiences, knee osteoarthritis, outcome, qualitative research, satisfaction
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-3369 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2019.1620551 (DOI)31116100 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-06-12 Created: 2019-06-12 Last updated: 2020-06-02Bibliographically approved
Andersson, H., Andreassen Gleissman, S., Lindholm, C. & Fossum, B. (2016). Experiences of nursing staff caring for patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.. International Nursing Review, 63(2), 233-241
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of nursing staff caring for patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.
2016 (English)In: International Nursing Review, ISSN 0020-8132, E-ISSN 1466-7657, Vol. 63, no 2, p. 233-241Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a resistant variant of S. aureus and can cause pneumonia, septicaemia and, in some cases, death. Caring for patients with antibiotic resistant bacteria is a challenge for healthcare personnel. There is a risk of spreading the bacteria among patients and of healthcare personnel being infected themselves.

AIM: To describe nursing staffs' experiences of caring for patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus in Sweden.

METHOD: A descriptive qualitative approach was used and 15 nurses from different hospitals and care units, including emergency and geriatric wards and nursing homes in Stockholm, were interviewed. All nurses had been involved in the care of patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus, but not on a regular basis. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

FINDINGS: Three themes emerged from the data: feeling ignorant, afraid and insecure, feeling competent and secure and feeling stressed and overworked. The more knowledge the nurses acquired about methicillin-resistant S. aureus, the more positive was their attitude to caring for these patients.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Caring for patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus without adequate knowledge of how to protect oneself and other patients against transmission may provoke anxiety among personnel. Guidelines, memos and adequate information at the right time are of central importance. Healthcare personnel must feel safe in their role as caregivers. All patients have the right to have the same quality of care regardless of the diagnosis and a lack of knowledge influences the level of care given.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING AND HEALTH POLICY: This study demonstrates the importance of education when caring for patients with infectious diseases. Hopefully, knowledge gained from our study can provide guidance for future health care when new diseases and infections occur.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Blackwell Science Ltd, 2016
Keywords
Content analysis, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Nursing care, Nursing staffs' experiences, Qualitative interview, Sweden
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-2143 (URN)10.1111/inr.12245 (DOI)26850089 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-02 Created: 2016-03-02 Last updated: 2020-06-02Bibliographically approved
Nyvang, J., Hedström, M. & Andreassen Gleissman, S. (2016). It's not just a knee, but a whole life: A qualitative descriptive study on patients' experiences of living with knee osteoarthritis and their expectations for knee arthroplasty.. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>It's not just a knee, but a whole life: A qualitative descriptive study on patients' experiences of living with knee osteoarthritis and their expectations for knee arthroplasty.
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: Knee arthroplasties are an increasingly common treatment for osteoarthritis (OA) and the main indication is pain. Previous research states, however, that 15-20% of the operated patients are dissatisfied and 20-30% have persistent pain after surgery. This study is aimed at describing patients' experiences of living with knee OA when scheduled for surgery and further their expectations for future life after surgery.

METHODS: We interviewed 12 patients with knee OA scheduled for arthroplasty, using semi-structured qualitative interviews. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative thematic analysis.

FINDINGS: Three categories were formulated with an overriding theme: "It's not just a knee, but a whole life." The three categories were "Change from their earlier lives," "Coping with knee problems," and "Ultimate decision to undergo surgery." The main finding was that knee OA affects the whole body and self, ultimately affecting the patients' lives on many levels. Further findings were that knee OA was considered to be the central focus in the participants' lives, which limited their level of activity, their ability to function as desired, their quality of life, and their mental well-being. Although surgery was considered to be the only solution, the expectations regarding the outcome differed.

CONCLUSIONS: The participants were forced to change how they previously had lived their lives resulting in a feeling of loss. Thus, the experienced loss and expectations for future life must be put into the context of the individual's own personality and be taken into account when treating individuals with knee OA. The experience of living with knee OA largely varies between individuals. This mandates that patients' assessment should be considered on individual basis with regard to each patient.

Keywords
Knee osteoarthritis, Expectations, Experiences, Knee arthroplasty, Pain, Qualitative research
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-2173 (URN)10.3402/qhw.v11.30193 (DOI)27036130 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-11 Created: 2016-04-11 Last updated: 2020-06-02Bibliographically approved
Axelsson, L., Klang, B., Lundh Hagelin, C., Jacobson, S. H. & Andreassen Gleissman, S. (2015). End of life of patients treated with haemodialysis as narrated by their close relatives. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 29(4), 776-784
Open this publication in new window or tab >>End of life of patients treated with haemodialysis as narrated by their close relatives
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2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 776-784Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: The study aimed to describe end of life for patients treated with maintenance haemodialysis as narrated by their close relatives.

INTRODUCTION: Many patients undergoing haemodialysis are older, have several comorbidities and underestimated symptoms and are in their last year of life. To improve care, we need to know more about their end-of-life situation.

DESIGN: Qualitative and descriptive.

METHODS: Qualitative retrospective interviews were conducted with 14 close relatives of deceased haemodialysis patients (3-13 months after death). Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The study is ethically approved.

FINDINGS: In the last months, a gradual deterioration in health with acute episodes necessitating hospital admissions was described. This involved diminishing living space and expressions of dejection, but also of joy. Three patterns emerged in the last weeks: uncertain anticipation of death as life fades away; awaiting death after haemodialysis withdrawal; and sudden but not unexpected death following intensive care. Findings show complexities of decisions on haemodialysis withdrawal.

CONCLUSIONS: Different end-of-life patterns all involved increasingly complex care needs and existential issues. Findings show a need for earlier care planning. The identification of organisational factors to facilitate continuity and whole person care to meet these patients' specific care needs with their complex symptom burdens and comorbidities is needed. Findings indicate the need for integration of a palliative care approach in the treatment of patients in haemodialysis care.

Keywords
End of life, End-stage renal disease, Haemodialysis, Qualitative content analysis, Qualitative interviews, Retrospective interviews
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-1814 (URN)10.1111/scs.12209 (DOI)25754028 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-03-11 Created: 2015-03-11 Last updated: 2020-06-02Bibliographically approved
Axelsson, L., Klang, B., Lundh Hagelin, C., Jacobson, S. H. & Andreassen Gleissman, S. (2015). Meanings of being a close relative of a family member treated with haemodialysis. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 24(3/4), 447-456
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Meanings of being a close relative of a family member treated with haemodialysis
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 3/4, p. 447-456Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

To describe and elucidate the meanings of being a close relative of a severely ill family member treated with maintenance haemodialysis approaching the end of life.

BACKGROUND:

End-stage renal disease together with comorbidities, haemodialysis treatment and high mortality rates also affects the lives of close relatives, who report burdens and impaired quality of life. To improve care, more understanding is needed of close relatives' experiences during these patients' end of life.

DESIGN:

This study has a qualitative interpretative design.

METHODS:

Fourteen retrospective qualitative interviews were conducted with close relatives (aged 48-93 years) of deceased patients who had been treated with haemodialysis. The interview text was interpreted using a phenomenological hermeneutical method in three phases.

RESULTS:

The findings of the structural analysis were formulated as six themes: Striving to be supportive and helpful without doing harm to the ill person's self; Needing increasing strength and support; Balancing the will to help with one's own ongoing life; Increasing responsibility involving dilemmas; Striving for a good life together in the present and Living with awareness of death.

CONCLUSIONS:

Close relatives strive for balance and well-being accompanying their ill family member through the end of life. They are facing moral dilemmas and growing demands as their responsibility increases with the deterioration of their family member. Support from and interaction with the healthcare professionals is then of significance.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

Findings challenge healthcare professionals in haemodialysis settings to identify close relatives' individual resources and needs towards the patients' end of life. Healthcare professionals in haemodialysis settings need to offer close relatives opportunities to talk about the future and what may be expected at end of life, with or without haemodialysis. They should also contact the closest relative after the death as they may need confirmation and closure.

Keywords
Close relative, Death, Dying, End of life, End-stage renal disease, Haemodialysis, Phenomenological hermeneutics, Qualitative interviews, Retrospective interviews
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-1360 (URN)10.1111/jocn.12622 (DOI)24811430 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-05-23 Created: 2013-05-23 Last updated: 2020-06-02Bibliographically approved
Egberg, L., Andreassen, S. & Mattiasson, A.-C. (2013). Living a demanding life - spouses' experiences of living with a person suffering from intermittent claudication. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 69(3), 610-618
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Living a demanding life - spouses' experiences of living with a person suffering from intermittent claudication
2013 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 69, no 3, p. 610-618Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim.  To report a study of family members’ experiences of living with a person suffering from intermittent claudication caused by peripheral arterial disease.

Background.  Intermittent claudication is a symptom caused by peripheral arterial disease. Walking ability is reduced due to pain and this also affects the family members and leads to consequences such as isolation and a restricted life.

Design.  This study has a qualitative descriptive design.

Methods.  Ten spouses living with a person suffering from intermittent claudication were interviewed between December 2009–June 2010. The interviews were then analysed using qualitative thematic analysis.

Findings.  Four themes were identified: ‘Frustrating to not meet intentions’, ‘Undergoing changes in social life’, ‘Being a person on the side of things’ and ‘Intertwining of circumstances’. The overall theme ‘Living a demanding life’ illustrates that intermittent claudication has great impact on daily life among spouses.

Conclusion.  This study gives an insight into the complexities and the difficulties of living together with someone suffering from intermittent claudication, a symptom that has great impact on both the spouses’ and the ill persons’ lives. According to the findings in this study, it is important to gain knowledge about the spouses’ experiences because an holistic perspective is essential to treat and support the ill persons and their spouses.

Keywords
Experiences, Family members, Intermittent claudication, Nursing, Peripheral vascular diseases
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-893 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2648.2012.06043.x (DOI)22616826 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-11-11 Created: 2011-11-11 Last updated: 2020-06-02Bibliographically approved
Egberg, L., Andreassen, S. & Mattiasson, A.-C. (2012). Experiences of living with intermittent claudication. Journal of Vascular Nursing, 30(1), 5-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of living with intermittent claudication
2012 (English)In: Journal of Vascular Nursing, ISSN 1062-0303, E-ISSN 1532-6578, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 5-10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Intermittent claudication is a symptom caused by peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and is associated with pain, impaired mobility and loss of control. Walking ability is reduced due to the pain, and both physical and social functions are often negatively affected, which may lead to patients feeling they are a burden to others. An interview study using a qualitative descriptive design to describe experiences of living with intermittent claudication caused by PAD was carried out during Winter and Spring 2009/2010. Fifteen people suffering from intermittent claudication were interviewed, and the interviews were analyzed using qualitative thematic analysis. Intermittent claudication greatly affects daily living. Six themes were identified: "Experiencing discomfort in the legs," "Moving around in a new way," "Feeling inconvenient when forced to stop," "Missing previous life," "Incorporating intermittent claudication in daily life," and "To lead a strenuous life." The main theme was "Adjusting to a restricted life." The findings show that intermittent claudication has a major impact on daily life. Apart from the severity of symptoms, how the illness is experienced differs among patients, depending on how active the ill person is or wants to be. These findings suggest that increased knowledge about living with intermittent claudication is important to understand the effects on the ill person's life, as a complement to physical examinations when planning individual treatment.

Keywords
Intermittent claudication, Peripheral vascular disease, Experiences, Life situation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-892 (URN)10.1016/j.jvn.2011.11.001 (DOI)22321401 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-11-11 Created: 2011-11-11 Last updated: 2020-06-02Bibliographically approved
Ancker, T., Gebhardt, A., Andreassen, S. & Botond, A. (2012). Tidig förlust: kvinnors upplevelse av missfall. Vård i Norden, 32(1), 32-36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tidig förlust: kvinnors upplevelse av missfall
2012 (Swedish)In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 32-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Up to 15 percent of all diagnosed pregnancies end in miscarriage. The loss can cause deep sorrow with complex emotional reactions as a result. Research shows that women often feel alone with their experiences of miscarriage and experience a wide range of emotions. The aim of this study was to describe the mourning woman’s experiences of early miscarriage. Six women who repeatedly had undergone miscarriage at a desired pregnancy were interviewed. The interviews were semi structured and analyzed with qualitative content analysis. The findings show that the miscarriages significantly affected the women’s life. Several psychological needs were identified, of which the most important were the need to feel unconditionally understood and having people at their side who attentively listen, provide security and respect their loss. These needs were rarely met in a satisfactory manner in health care. Regarding the women’s strong emotional reactions, it is desirable to have a routinely scheduled follow-up in which the women’s entire experience of the miscarriage is taken into consideration.

Keywords
Miscarriage, Experience, Bereavement
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-1008 (URN)
Available from: 2012-04-20 Created: 2012-04-20 Last updated: 2020-06-02Bibliographically approved
Andreassen, S., Randers, I., Ternulf Nyhlin, K. & Mattiasson, A.-C. (2007). A meta-analysis of qualitative studies on living with oesophageal and clinically similar forms of cancer, seen from the perspective of patients and family members. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 2(2), 114-27
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A meta-analysis of qualitative studies on living with oesophageal and clinically similar forms of cancer, seen from the perspective of patients and family members
2007 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 114-27Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study is part of a research programme of which the aim is to generate knowledge about patients' and family members' experiences of living with oesophageal cancer from their perspective. The aim of the present study was to extend this knowledge by adding other forms of cancer: other upper gastrointestinal cancer, and head and neck cancer. These cancer forms have clinical similarities with oesophageal cancer and the survival rates are similar. This study is a qualitative meta-analysis that examines the results reported in 13 qualitative original research reports, published in peer-reviewed nursing journals between April 1998 and June 2006. We used thematic analysis. Three themes were formulated: “running into an unpredictable enemy”, “enduring a fading body” and “entering social silence”. Patients and family members gave voice to a suffering that involved the whole person. Our findings show that the whole person must be given care, and this care must include the whole family

Keywords
Meta-analysis, Illnes experiences, Upper gastrointestinal cancer, Head and neck cancer, Thematic analysis, Patient and family perspective
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-18 (URN)
Available from: 2010-03-02 Created: 2010-02-19 Last updated: 2020-06-02Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9929-4779

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