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Lindholm, Christina
Publications (10 of 31) Show all publications
Lindholm, C., Styche, T. J. & Horton, H. E. (2021). Diagnosis and treatment impacts on wound care efficiency drivers: Real-world analysis. Journal of Wound Care, 30(7), 534-542
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diagnosis and treatment impacts on wound care efficiency drivers: Real-world analysis
2021 (English)In: Journal of Wound Care, ISSN 0969-0700, E-ISSN 2052-2916, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 534-542Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The prevalence and economic burden of wounds are growing. Any wound has the potential to become hard-to-heal and require frequent care. Clinicians need to find ways to absorb demand on services without compromising outcomes. Drivers of wound care efficiency-time-to-heal, frequency of dressing change and the incidence of complications-can be evaluated to shape future wound management. A survey of wound care was conducted by clinicians from five centres in Sweden over a one-week period, during which clinicians documented every wound once. At the time of surveying, 49% of wounds were considered to be improving, infection incidence was 11.7% and dressings were changed a mean of 2.2 times per week, with highly exuding wounds changed 6.9 times per week. The data highlighted the importance of diagnosing patient and wound characteristics in selecting treatments and organising care. Recognised gaps in diagnoses potentially identify opportunities to influence healing, complication incidence and intensity of nursing, thus reducing demand on resources. In conclusion, this survey highlights opportunities to reduce the burdens these drivers present. Through improved diagnosis and alignment to recognised care pathways, there is potential to improve patient outcomes and alleviate the strains placed upon wound care providers.

Keywords
Chronic, Dressing change, Dressings, Hard-to-heal, Healing, Incidence, Infection, Patient outcomes, Prevalence, Survey, Time-to-heal, Wound, Wound management
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-4173 (URN)10.12968/jowc.2021.30.7.534 (DOI)34256595 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-08-11 Created: 2021-08-11 Last updated: 2021-08-11Bibliographically approved
Gardulf, A., Florin, J., Carlsson, M., Leksell, J., Lepp, M., Lindholm, C., . . . Nilsson, J. (2019). The Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale: A tool that can be used in national and international assessments of nursing education programmes. Nordic journal of nursing research, 39(3), 137-142
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale: A tool that can be used in national and international assessments of nursing education programmes
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2019 (English)In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 137-142Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The quality of basic nursing bachelor programmes nationally and internationally must regularly be assessed to ensure that they fulfil requirements and are appropriate in relation to developments and changes in societies and healthcare systems. There is a need for instruments in helping to assess this. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale could serve as a tool to measure and detect possible differences between universities/university colleges regarding nursing students' self-reported competence. Totally, 543 nursing students who had just completed their academic three-year nursing bachelor programmes at 10 universities/university colleges in Sweden participated in the study (response rate 71%). The students answered the NPC Scale with its 88 items constituting eight competence areas (CAs) and two overarching themes. The results from using the NPC Scale by the students were then compared between the 10 universities/university colleges. Significant mean score differences were found between the universities/university colleges on all CAs and on both themes. The highest mean score differences were found for the CAs 'Medical and technical care' and 'Documentation and information technology'. The lowest mean score differences were found for the CAs 'Value-based nursing care' and 'Leadership in and development of nursing'. It is concluded that the NPC Scale can serve as a useful tool in national and international assessments of nursing bachelor programmes.

Keywords
Competence areas, education assessments, nurse competence, nursing education, nursing students, quality assessments
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-3556 (URN)10.1177/2057158518824530 (DOI)
Available from: 2020-01-13 Created: 2020-01-13 Last updated: 2020-06-02Bibliographically approved
Lindholm, C. & Grauers, M. (Eds.). (2017). Sårbehandling 2017/2018: katalog över sårprodukter (8ed.). Stockholm: Gothia Fortbildning
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sårbehandling 2017/2018: katalog över sårprodukter
2017 (Swedish)Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Gothia Fortbildning, 2017. p. 381 Edition: 8
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-2579 (URN)978-91-8809-978-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-02-02 Created: 2017-02-02 Last updated: 2020-06-02Bibliographically approved
Butler, E., Oien, R. F., Lindholm, C., Olofsson, T. C., Nilson, B. & Vásquez, A. (2016). A pilot study investigating lactic acid bacterial symbionts from the honeybee in inhibiting human chronic wound pathogens. International Wound Journal, 13(5), 729-37
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A pilot study investigating lactic acid bacterial symbionts from the honeybee in inhibiting human chronic wound pathogens
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2016 (English)In: International Wound Journal, ISSN 1742-4801, E-ISSN 1742-481X, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 729-37Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Treatment and management of chronic wounds is a large burden on the health sector and causes substantial suffering for the patients. We believe that 13 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) symbionts isolated from the honey crop of the honeybee are important players in the antimicrobial action of honey, by producing antimicrobial substances and can be used in combination with heather honey as an effective treatment in wound management. A total of 22 patients with chronic ulcers were included; culture-dependent and molecular-based (MALDI-MS and 16S rRNA gene sequencing) techniques were used to identify bacteria from chronic wounds. These clinical isolates were used for in vitro antimicrobial testing with standardised viable LAB and sterilised heather honey mixture. Twenty of the patients' wounds were polymicrobial and 42 different species were isolated. Patient isolates that were tested in vitro were inhibited by the LAB and honey combination with inhibitory zones comparable with different antibiotics. LAB and heather honey in combination presents a new topical option in chronic wound management because of the healing properties of honey, antimicrobial metabolite production from the LAB and their bactericidal effect on common chronic wound pathogens. This new treatment may be a stepping stone towards an alternative solution to antibiotics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2016
Keywords
Antimicrobial activity, Chronic wounds, Honey, Honeybee, Lactic acid bacteria, Microbial characterisation
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-1714 (URN)10.1111/iwj.12360 (DOI)25196349 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-10-16 Created: 2014-10-16 Last updated: 2020-06-02Bibliographically approved
Andersson, H., Andreassen Gleissman, S., Lindholm, C. & Fossum, B. (2016). Experiences of nursing staff caring for patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.. International Nursing Review, 63(2), 233-241
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of nursing staff caring for patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.
2016 (English)In: International Nursing Review, ISSN 0020-8132, E-ISSN 1466-7657, Vol. 63, no 2, p. 233-241Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a resistant variant of S. aureus and can cause pneumonia, septicaemia and, in some cases, death. Caring for patients with antibiotic resistant bacteria is a challenge for healthcare personnel. There is a risk of spreading the bacteria among patients and of healthcare personnel being infected themselves.

AIM: To describe nursing staffs' experiences of caring for patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus in Sweden.

METHOD: A descriptive qualitative approach was used and 15 nurses from different hospitals and care units, including emergency and geriatric wards and nursing homes in Stockholm, were interviewed. All nurses had been involved in the care of patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus, but not on a regular basis. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

FINDINGS: Three themes emerged from the data: feeling ignorant, afraid and insecure, feeling competent and secure and feeling stressed and overworked. The more knowledge the nurses acquired about methicillin-resistant S. aureus, the more positive was their attitude to caring for these patients.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Caring for patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus without adequate knowledge of how to protect oneself and other patients against transmission may provoke anxiety among personnel. Guidelines, memos and adequate information at the right time are of central importance. Healthcare personnel must feel safe in their role as caregivers. All patients have the right to have the same quality of care regardless of the diagnosis and a lack of knowledge influences the level of care given.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING AND HEALTH POLICY: This study demonstrates the importance of education when caring for patients with infectious diseases. Hopefully, knowledge gained from our study can provide guidance for future health care when new diseases and infections occur.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Blackwell Science Ltd, 2016
Keywords
Content analysis, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Nursing care, Nursing staffs' experiences, Qualitative interview, Sweden
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-2143 (URN)10.1111/inr.12245 (DOI)26850089 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-02 Created: 2016-03-02 Last updated: 2020-06-02Bibliographically approved
Olofsson, T. C., Butler, É., Lindholm, C., Nilson, B., Michanek, P. & Vásquez, A. (2016). Fighting Off Wound Pathogens in Horses with Honeybee Lactic Acid Bacteria.. Current Microbiology, 73(4), 463-73
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fighting Off Wound Pathogens in Horses with Honeybee Lactic Acid Bacteria.
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2016 (English)In: Current Microbiology, ISSN 0343-8651, E-ISSN 1432-0991, Vol. 73, no 4, p. 463-73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the global perspective of antibiotic resistance, it is urgent to find potent topical antibiotics for the use in human and animal infection. Healing of equine wounds, particularly in the limbs, is difficult due to hydrostatic factors and exposure to environmental contaminants, which can lead to heavy bio-burden/biofilm formation and sometimes to infection. Therefore, antibiotics are often prescribed. Recent studies have shown that honeybee-specific lactic acid bacteria (LAB), involved in honey production, and inhibit human wound pathogens. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effects on the healing of hard-to-heal equine wounds after treatment with these LAB symbionts viable in a heather honey formulation. For this, we included ten horses with wound duration of >1 year, investigated the wound microbiota, and treated wounds with the novel honeybee LAB formulation. We identified the microbiota using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and DNA sequencing. In addition, the antimicrobial properties of the honeybee LAB formulation were tested against all wound isolates in vitro. Our results indicate a diverse wound microbiota including fifty-three bacterial species that showed 90 % colonization by at least one species of Staphylococcus. Treatment with the formulation promoted wound healing in all cases already after the first application and the wounds were either completely healed (n = 3) in less than 20 days or healing was in progress. Furthermore, the honeybee LAB formulation inhibited all pathogens when tested in vitro. Consequently, this new treatment option presents as a powerful candidate for the topical treatment of hard-to-heal wounds in horses.

National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-2521 (URN)10.1007/s00284-016-1080-2 (DOI)27324340 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-12-21 Created: 2016-12-21 Last updated: 2020-06-02Bibliographically approved
Pokorná, A., Öien, R. F., Forssell, H. & Lindholm, C. (2016). International Cooperation in Pressure Ulcers Prevalence, Prevention and Treatment is Chal lenged by the Lack of National Registries.. Česká a Slovenská neurologie a neurochirurgie, 79(Suppl. 1), 20-24
Open this publication in new window or tab >>International Cooperation in Pressure Ulcers Prevalence, Prevention and Treatment is Chal lenged by the Lack of National Registries.
2016 (English)In: Česká a Slovenská neurologie a neurochirurgie, ISSN 1210-7859, Vol. 79, no Suppl. 1, p. 20-24Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-2505 (URN)10.14735/amcsnn2016S20 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-12-19 Created: 2016-12-19 Last updated: 2020-06-02Bibliographically approved
Olofsson, T. C., Butler, E., Markowicz, P., Lindholm, C., Larsson, L. & Vásquez, A. (2016). Lactic acid bacterial symbionts in honeybees - an unknown key to honey's antimicrobial and therapeutic activities. International Wound Journal, 13(5), 668-79
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lactic acid bacterial symbionts in honeybees - an unknown key to honey's antimicrobial and therapeutic activities
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2016 (English)In: International Wound Journal, ISSN 1742-4801, E-ISSN 1742-481X, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 668-79Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Could honeybees' most valuable contribution to mankind besides pollination services be alternative tools against infections? Today, due to the emerging antibiotic-resistant pathogens, we are facing a new era of searching for alternative tools against infections. Natural products such as honey have been applied against human's infections for millennia without sufficient scientific evidence. A unique lactic acid bacterial (LAB) microbiota was discovered by us, which is in symbiosis with honeybees and present in large amounts in fresh honey across the world. This work investigates if the LAB symbionts are the source to the unknown factors contributing to honey's properties. Hence, we tested the LAB against severe wound pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) among others. We demonstrate a strong antimicrobial activity from each symbiont and a synergistic effect, which counteracted all the tested pathogens. The mechanisms of action are partly shown by elucidating the production of active compounds such as proteins, fatty acids, anaesthetics, organic acids, volatiles and hydrogen peroxide. We show that the symbionts produce a myriad of active compounds that remain in variable amounts in mature honey. Further studies are now required to investigate if these symbionts have a potential in clinical applications as alternative tools against topical human and animal infections.

Keywords
Alternative antibiotic tools, Bioactive metabolites, Honey, Honeybees, Lactic acid bacteria, Symbiosis, Wound management
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-1715 (URN)10.1111/iwj.12345 (DOI)25195876 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-10-16 Created: 2014-10-16 Last updated: 2020-06-02Bibliographically approved
Eulau, L., Paulander, A.-S. & Lindholm, C. (2016). PC-Music: a cross disciplinary model combining nursing and music therapy as pain management. In: : . Paper presented at Second Nordic Conference in Nursing research, 15-17 June 2016, Stockholm..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>PC-Music: a cross disciplinary model combining nursing and music therapy as pain management
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

While nursing and music therapy have been two important disciplines in analysis of pain management, there has been little research exploring these areas from a cross disciplinary perspective. This paper highlights the importance of acknowledging and beginning to understand the role of scientific and practical cooperation between music therapists and health care professionals.

In particular, our aim has been to initiate a dialogue about how subject-specific knowledge from both music therapy and nursing – in terms of person-centered care – can strengthen the usage of music as pain management for short-term management of acute pain during painful treatments such as dressing change procedure in wound care. On this basis, a pilot study was conducted regarding wound care. The study has been approved by the ethics committee in Stockholm. The paper is based on the result from this study where the aim was to find a model for pain management as a complementary treatment based on knowledge from nursing and music therapy.

Philosophical starting points were the “life-world” perspective of Merleau-Ponty as well as Ricoeur’s ethical thoughts. The result has a potential reach beyond wound care that can be used in several treatments that entails acute pain.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-2445 (URN)
Conference
Second Nordic Conference in Nursing research, 15-17 June 2016, Stockholm.
Note

Muntlig presentation hölls av Louise Eulau.

Available from: 2016-09-23 Created: 2016-09-23 Last updated: 2020-06-02Bibliographically approved
Zubair, M., Nybom, H., Lindholm, C., Brandner, J. M. & Rumpunen, K. (2016). Promotion of wound healing by Plantago major L. leaf extracts: Ex-vivo experiments confirm experiences from traditional medicine. Natural Product Research, 30(5), 622-624
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Promotion of wound healing by Plantago major L. leaf extracts: Ex-vivo experiments confirm experiences from traditional medicine
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2016 (English)In: Natural Product Research, ISSN 1478-6419, E-ISSN 1478-6427, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 622-624Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The wound-healing properties of Plantago major L. (plantain) were evaluated using an ex-vivo porcine wound-healing model. Ethanol- and water-based extracts were prepared from greenhouse-grown and freeze-dried leaves of P. major. Both types of extracts stimulated wound healing in porcine skin, but the ethanol-based extracts had a somewhat stronger effect. A concentration of 1.0 mg/mL (on dry weight basis) produced the best results for both types of extracts.

Keywords
Plantaginaceae, Plantamajoside, Polyphenols, Common Plantain
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-2122 (URN)10.1080/14786419.2015.1034714 (DOI)25898918 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-01-29 Created: 2016-01-29 Last updated: 2020-06-02Bibliographically approved
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