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Johansson, Unn-BrittORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3309-136x
Publications (10 of 125) Show all publications
Woldamanuel, Y., Bergman, P., von Rosen, P., Johansson, U.-B., Hagströmer, M. & Rossen, J. (2024). Association between weather and self-monitored steps in individuals with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes in Sweden over two years. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 21(4), Article ID 379.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between weather and self-monitored steps in individuals with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes in Sweden over two years
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2024 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 21, no 4, article id 379Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Many studies have identified key factors affecting the rates of engagement in physical activity in older adults with chronic disease. Environmental conditions, such as weather variations, can present challenges for individuals with chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes when engaging in physical activity. However, few studies have investigated the influence of weather on daily steps in people with chronic diseases, especially those with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes.

OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the association between weather variations and daily self-monitored step counts over two years among individuals with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes in Sweden.

METHODS: The study is a secondary analysis using data from the Sophia Step Study, aimed at promoting physical activity among people with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, which recruited participants from two urban primary care centers in Stockholm and one rural primary care center in southern Sweden over eight rounds. This study measured physical activity using step counters (Yamax Digiwalker SW200) and collected self-reported daily steps. Environmental factors such as daily average temperature, precipitation, and hours of sunshine were obtained from the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute. A robust linear mixed-effects model was applied as the analysis method.

RESULTS: There was no association found between weather variations and the number of steps taken on a daily basis. The analysis indicated that only 10% of the variation in daily steps could be explained by the average temperature, precipitation, and sunshine hours after controlling for age, gender, and BMI. Conversely, individual factors explained approximately 38% of the variation in the observations.

CONCLUSION: This study revealed that there was no association between weather conditions and the number of daily steps reported by individuals with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes taking part in a physical activity intervention over two years. Despite the weather conditions, women and younger people reported more steps than their male and older counterparts.

Keywords
Physical activity, Precipitation, Prediabetes, Steps, Sunshine, Temperature, Type 2 diabetes
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-5326 (URN)10.3390/ijerph21040379 (DOI)38673292 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2024-05-15 Created: 2024-05-15 Last updated: 2024-05-15Bibliographically approved
Kullenberg, H., Rossen, J., Johansson, U.-B., Hagströmer, M., Nyström, T., Kumlin, M. & Svedberg, M. (2024). Correlations between insulin-degrading enzyme and metabolic markers in patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and healthy controls: A comparative study. Endocrine, 84(2), 450-458
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correlations between insulin-degrading enzyme and metabolic markers in patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and healthy controls: A comparative study
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2024 (English)In: Endocrine, ISSN 1355-008X, E-ISSN 1559-0100, Vol. 84, no 2, p. 450-458Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: This study aimed to explore correlations between insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) and markers of metabolic function in a group of patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or Alzheimer's disease (AD) and metabolically healthy volunteers.

METHOD: We included 120 individuals (47 with T2DM, 9 with AD, and 64 healthy controls). Serum levels of IDE were measured with commercial kits for ELISA. Differences in IDE levels between groups were analyzed with non-parametric ANCOVA, and correlations were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlations. We also investigated the influence of age, sex, and the use of insulin on the correlation using a non-parametric version of partial correlation.

RESULTS: Patients diagnosed with T2DM had higher IDE levels than patients diagnosed with AD and healthy controls after adjustment for age and sex. IDE was increasingly associated with body mass index (BMI), fasting blood glucose, C-peptide, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), insulin resistance, and triglycerides. In stratified analyses, we found a decreasing partial correlation between IDE and HbA1c in patients diagnosed with AD and a decreasing partial correlation between IDE and C-peptide in healthy controls. In patients diagnosed with T2DM, we found no partial correlations.

CONCLUSION: These results indicate that IDE is essential in metabolic function and might reflect metabolic status, although it is not yet a biomarker that can be utilized in clinical practice. Further research on IDE in human blood may provide crucial insights into the full function of the enzyme.

Keywords
Alzheimer’s disease, Insulin resistance, Insulin-degrading enzyme, Metabolic disorder, Serum, Type 2 diabetes mellitus
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-5079 (URN)10.1007/s12020-023-03603-4 (DOI)37980298 (PubMedID)
Note

As manuscript in dissertation.

Available from: 2023-11-23 Created: 2023-11-23 Last updated: 2024-06-24Bibliographically approved
Johansson, U.-B., Andreassen Gleissman, S., Korkeila Liden, M., Wickman, M., Gustafsson, B. & Sjöberg, S. (2024). Mixed methods study on the feasibility of implementing periodic continuous glucose monitoring among individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus in a primary care setting. Heliyon, 10(8), Article ID e29498.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mixed methods study on the feasibility of implementing periodic continuous glucose monitoring among individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus in a primary care setting
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2024 (English)In: Heliyon, ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 10, no 8, article id e29498Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Health care professionals (HCPs) play a central role in leveraging technologies to support individuals with diabetes. This mixed-method study was completed to determine the feasibility of implementing periodic continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in a primary care setting.

AIM: This study aimed to evaluate and describe the experiences of using periodic CGM with data visualization tools in patients with type 2 diabetes to foster a person-centered approach in a primary care setting.

METHODS: Fifty outpatients aged ≥18 years, diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and with a disease duration of at least 2 years were included in this study. Data were collected from April 2021 to January 2022. Patients completed a single period of sensor measurements for 28 days and a diabetes questionnaire about feelings and experiences of health care. HbA1c was also measured. A focus group interview was conducted to evaluate and describe the HCPs experiences of using periodic CGM.

RESULTS: Patients reported to HCPs that the CGM device was comfortable to wear and noted that LibreView was easy to use when scanning the sensor to obtain and visualize the glucose levels and trends. Data availability of CGM data was >70 %.Clinical observations revealed a mean reduction in HbA1c, mmol/mol from 60.06 [7.65 %] at baseline to 55.42 [7.20 %] after 4 weeks (p < 0.001). Two categories were identified: 1) Fostering dialogue on self-care and 2) Promoting understanding.

CONCLUSIONS: The HCPs and participants in this study had a positive experience or viewed the implementation of periodic CGM with data visualization tools as a positive experience and appeared to be feasible for implementation in a primary care setting.

Keywords
Continuous glucose monitoring, Feasibility: focus group interview: person-centered care, Type 2 diabetes
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-5325 (URN)10.1016/j.heliyon.2024.e29498 (DOI)38660249 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2024-05-15 Created: 2024-05-15 Last updated: 2024-05-15Bibliographically approved
Larsson, K., Rossen, J., Norman, Å., Johansson, U.-B. & Hagströmer, M. (2024). Predictors associated with an increase in daily steps among people with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes participating in a two-year pedometer intervention. BMC Public Health, 24, Article ID 1290.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictors associated with an increase in daily steps among people with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes participating in a two-year pedometer intervention
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2024 (English)In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 24, article id 1290Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: This study aimed to explore predictors associated with intermediate (six months) and post-intervention (24 months) increases in daily steps among people with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes participating in a two-year pedometer intervention.

Methods: A secondary analysis was conducted based on data from people with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes from two intervention arms of the randomised controlled trial Sophia Step Study. Daily steps were measured with an ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer. Participants were divided into two groups based on their response to the intervention: Group 1) ≥ 500 increase in daily steps or Group 2) a decrease or < 500 increase in daily steps. Data from baseline and from six- and 24-month follow-ups were used for analysis. The response groups were used as outcomes in a multiple logistic regression together with baseline predictors including self-efficacy, social support, health-related variables, intervention group, demographics and steps at baseline. Predictors were included in the regression if they had a p-value < 0.2 from bivariate analyses.

Results: In total, 83 participants were included. The mean ± SD age was 65.2 ± 6.8 years and 33% were female. At six months, a lower number of steps at baseline was a significant predictor for increasing ≥ 500 steps per day (OR = 0.82, 95% CI 0.69-0.98). At 24 months, women had 79% lower odds of increasing ≥ 500 steps per day (OR = 0.21, 95% CI 0.05-0.88), compared to men. For every year of increase in age, the odds of increasing ≥ 500 steps per day decreased by 13% (OR = 0.87, 95% CI 0.78-0.97). Also, for every step increase in baseline self-efficacy, measured with the Self-Efficacy for Exercise Scale, the odds of increasing ≥ 500 steps per day increased by 14% (OR = 1.14, 95% CI 1.02-1.27).

Conclusions: In the Sophia Step Study pedometer intervention, participants with a lower number of steps at baseline, male gender, lower age or higher baseline self-efficacy were more likely to respond to the intervention with a step increase above 500 steps per day. More knowledge is needed about factors that influence response to pedometer interventions.

Keywords
Intervention, Prediabetes, Response, Steps, Type 2 diabetes
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-4994 (URN)10.1186/s12889-024-18766-6 (DOI)38734659 (PubMedID)
Note

As manuscript in dissertation.

Available from: 2023-09-04 Created: 2023-09-04 Last updated: 2024-06-24Bibliographically approved
Stephen, D. A., Nordin, A., Johansson, U.-B. & Nilsson, J. (2024). Psychosocial self-efficacy and its association with selected potential factors among adults with type 1 diabetes: A cross-sectional survey study. Diabetes Therapy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychosocial self-efficacy and its association with selected potential factors among adults with type 1 diabetes: A cross-sectional survey study
2024 (English)In: Diabetes Therapy, ISSN 1869-6953, E-ISSN 1869-6961Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: The management of type 1 diabetes, a non-preventable chronic disease, leads to a high physical and psychological burden on the individual. Digital health technology can improve a person's psychosocial self-efficacy and thereby contribute to improved diabetes self-care. The aim of this study was to explore associations between psychosocial self-efficacy and demographic-, disease specific-, well-being as well as digital health technology (DHT) related factors among adults with type 1 diabetes.

METHODS: A primarily web-based cross sectional survey was conducted among adults with type 1 diabetes in Sweden (n = 301). Psychosocial self-efficacy was assessed using the Swedish version of the Diabetes Empowerment Scale, Swe-DES-23. The survey also contained questions related to demographic-, disease specific-, well-being as well as digital health technology related variables.

RESULTS: Higher well-being scores and lower HbA1c levels were associated with higher psychosocial self-efficacy in multiple linear regression analysis. In multivariate analysis, gender, body mass index, well-being scores, and HbA1c levels showed association with psychosocial self-efficacy. None of the DHT factors were found associated with psychosocial self-efficacy.

CONCLUSIONS: In this study, higher well-being score and lower self-reported HbA1c levels were associated with higher psychosocial self-efficacy in both univariate- and multivariate analysis and accounted for 30% of the variation in psychosocial self-efficacy in the regression model. Thus, measures to improve psychosocial self-efficacy in adults with type 1 diabetes may help maintain their psychological well-being and blood glucose control.

Keywords
Cross-Sectional Study, Diabetes mellitus, type 1, Digital technology, Patient reported outcome measures, Psychological well-being, Self efficacy, Surveys and questionnaires
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-5324 (URN)10.1007/s13300-024-01581-y (DOI)38642262 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2024-05-15 Created: 2024-05-15 Last updated: 2024-05-15Bibliographically approved
Regan, C., Rosen, P. V., Andermo, S., Hagströmer, M., Johansson, U.-B. & Rossen, J. (2024). The acceptability, usability, engagement and optimisation of a mHealth service promoting healthy lifestyle behaviours: A mixed method feasibility study. Digital Health, 10, Article ID 20552076241247935.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The acceptability, usability, engagement and optimisation of a mHealth service promoting healthy lifestyle behaviours: A mixed method feasibility study
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2024 (English)In: Digital Health, ISSN 2055-2076, Vol. 10, article id 20552076241247935Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Mobile health (mHealth) services suffer from high attrition rates yet represent a viable strategy for adults to improve their health. There is a need to develop evidence-based mHealth services and to constantly evaluate their feasibility. This study explored the acceptability, usability, engagement and optimisation of a co-developed mHealth service, aiming to promote healthy lifestyle behaviours.

METHODS: The service LongLife Active® (LLA) is a mobile app with coaching. Adults were recruited from the general population. Quantitative results and qualitative findings guided the reasoning for the acceptability, usability, engagement and optimisation of LLA. Data from: questionnaires, log data, eight semi-structured interviews with users, feedback comments from users and two focus groups with product developers and coaches were collected. Inductive content analysis was used to analyse the qualitative data. A mixed method approach was used to interpret the findings.

RESULTS: The final sample was 55 users (82% female), who signed up to use the service for 12 weeks. Engagement data was available for 43 (78%). The action plan was the most popular function engaged with by users. The mean scores for acceptability and usability were 3.3/5.0 and 50/100, respectively, rated by 15 users. Users expressed that the service's health focus was unique, and the service gave them a 'kickstart' in their behaviour change. Many ways to optimise the service were identified, including to increase personalisation, promote motivation and improve usability.

CONCLUSION: By incorporating suggestions for optimisation, this service has the potential to support peoples' healthy lifestyle behaviours.

Keywords
Acceptability, Behaviour change, Engagement, Feasibility studies, Lifestyle, mHealth, Mixed methods, Mobile applications, Public health and usability testing
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-5323 (URN)10.1177/20552076241247935 (DOI)38638403 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2024-05-15 Created: 2024-05-15 Last updated: 2024-05-15Bibliographically approved
Larsson, K., Hagströmer, M., Rossen, J., Johansson, U.-B. & Norman, Å. (2023). Health care professionals' experiences of supporting persons with metabolic risk factors to increase their physical activity level: A qualitative study in primary care. Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, 41(2), 116-131
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health care professionals' experiences of supporting persons with metabolic risk factors to increase their physical activity level: A qualitative study in primary care
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2023 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 116-131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To be regularly physically active is of major importance for the health of people with metabolic risk factors. Many of these persons are insufficiently active and in need of support. This study aimed to explore barriers and facilitators perceived by health care professionals' within Swedish primary care in their work to support persons with metabolic risk factors to increase their physical activity.

DESIGN: A qualitative design with focus group discussions was used. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis with a manifest, inductive approach.

SETTING: Primary health care in five Swedish healthcare regions.

SUBJECTS: Nine physiotherapists, ten physicians and five nurses participated in six digital focus group discussions including two to six participants.

RESULTS: Barriers and facilitators to supporting persons with metabolic risk factors to increase their physical activity were found within four generic categories, where the barriers and facilitators related to each generic category: 'Patient readiness for change', 'Supporting the process of change', 'The professional role', and 'The organisation of primary care'.

CONCLUSION: The findings suggests that barriers and facilitators for supporting patients with metabolic risk factors can be found at several levels within primary care, from individual patient and the health care professionals to the organisational level. In the primary care setting, this should be highlighted when implementing support to increase physical activity in people with metabolic risk factors.KEY POINTSHealth care professionals within primary care are in a position to support people with metabolic risk factors to increase their physical activity.Barriers and facilitators to support the patients should be addressed at several levels within primary care.The study highlights factors on multiple levels such as professional responsibility, organisational prioritisation and resources, and the challenge to motivate behaviour change.

Keywords
Barriers, Sweden, Facilitators, Health care professionals, Physical activity, Primary care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-4903 (URN)10.1080/02813432.2023.2187668 (DOI)36927270 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-05-17 Created: 2023-05-17 Last updated: 2023-09-06Bibliographically approved
Wijk, I., Amsberg, S., Johansson, U.-B., Livheim, F., Toft, E. & Anderbro, T. (2023). Impact of an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy programme on HbA1c, self-management and psychosocial factors in adults with type 1 diabetes and elevated HbA1c levels: A randomised controlled trial. BMJ Open, 13(12), Article ID e072061.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy programme on HbA1c, self-management and psychosocial factors in adults with type 1 diabetes and elevated HbA1c levels: A randomised controlled trial
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2023 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 12, article id e072061Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To evaluate the impact of an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) programme, tailored for people living with type 1 diabetes, on glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), self-management and psychosocial factors among individuals with HbA1c>60 mmol/mol compared with treatment as usual (TAU).

Setting: An endocrinologic clinic in Sweden.

Participants: In this randomised controlled trial, 81 individuals with type 1 diabetes, aged 18-70 years with HbA1c>60 mmol/mol, were randomly assigned to either an ACT group intervention or TAU. Exclusion criteria were: unable to speak Swedish, untreated or severe psychiatric disease, cortisone treatment, untreated thyroid disease and newly started insulin pump therapy. At the 2-year follow-up, HbA1c was measured in 26 individuals.

Intervention: The ACT programme comprised seven 2-hour sessions held over 14 weeks and focused on acceptance of stressful thoughts and emotions, and to promote value-based committed action.

Outcomes: The primary outcome was HbA1c, and the secondary outcomes were measures of depression, anxiety, general stress, fear of hypoglycaemia, diabetes distress, self-care activities, psychological flexibility (general and related to diabetes) and quality of life. The primary endpoint was HbA1c 2 years after the intervention programme. Linear mixed models were used to test for an interaction effect between measurement time and group.

Results: Likelihood ratio test of nested models demonstrated no statistically significant interaction effect (χ2=0.49, p=0.485) between measurement time and group regarding HbA1c. However, a statistically significant interaction effect (likelihood ratio test χ2=12.63, p<0.001) was observed with improved scores on The Acceptance and Action Questionnaire in the intervention group after 1 and 2 years.

Conclusions: No statistically significant difference was found between the groups regarding the primary outcome measure, HbA1c. However, the ACT programme showed a persistent beneficial impact on psychological flexibility in the intervention group. The dropout rate was higher than expected, which may indicate a challenge in this type of study.

Keywords
Diabetes and endocrinology, Depression and mood disorders, Preventive medicine
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-5019 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2023-072061 (DOI)38101850 (PubMedID)
Note

As manuscript in dissertation.

Available from: 2023-10-02 Created: 2023-10-02 Last updated: 2024-06-24Bibliographically approved
Wijk, I., Amsberg, S., Andreassen Gleissman, S., Toft, E., Anderbro, T. & Johansson, U.-B. (2023). Living with type 1 diabetes as experienced by adults with prolonged elevated HbA1c: A qualitative study. Diabetes Therapy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Living with type 1 diabetes as experienced by adults with prolonged elevated HbA1c: A qualitative study
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2023 (English)In: Diabetes Therapy, ISSN 1869-6953, E-ISSN 1869-6961Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: High HbA1c levels in type 1 diabetes (T1D) are associated with increased risk of micro- and macrovascular complications and severe diabetes distress. A more comprehensive understanding of the adult perspective of living with T1D can improve the quality of care. We aimed to describe experiences of living with T1D as an adult with prolonged elevated HbA1c.

METHODS: Thirteen adults with T1D and HbA1c > 60 mmol/mol (7.6%) for at least 1 year were individually interviewed via a digital platform. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

RESULTS: The analysis identified an overarching theme, "a lifelong follower", and generated two main categories describing study participants' experience: constraining and manageable. Constraining experiences were explained in obligated control, loss of control, environmental impact, and consequences of diabetes. Manageable experiences were described in everyday life, approach to diabetes, and support in life. Diabetes knowledge in health care and in the general public, and individualized care were important factors in feeling understood, safe, and supported.

CONCLUSIONS: The findings revealed the diverse experiences of adults with prolonged elevated HbA1c. Living with T1D, a lifelong non-chosen follower, could be perceived as constraining but manageable in different degrees. A person-centered care approach addressing both dimensions may be beneficial. Experiences of living with and managing diabetes are multifaceted and intertwined with life context and medical prerequisites.

Keywords
Adults, Content analysis, Experiences, HbA1c, Qualitative research, Type 1 diabetes
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-4996 (URN)10.1007/s13300-023-01443-z (DOI)37470946 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-09-06 Created: 2023-09-06 Last updated: 2023-10-02Bibliographically approved
Haile, S. T., Johansson, U.-B., Lööf, H., Linné, A. & Joelsson-Alm, E. (2023). Patient related outcomes after receiving a person centred nurse led follow up programme among patients undergoing revascularisation for intermittent claudication: A secondary analysis of a randomised clinical trial. European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, 66(3), 371-379
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patient related outcomes after receiving a person centred nurse led follow up programme among patients undergoing revascularisation for intermittent claudication: A secondary analysis of a randomised clinical trial
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2023 (English)In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, ISSN 1078-5884, E-ISSN 1532-2165, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 371-379Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The aim was to evaluate the effect of a person centred nurse led follow up programme on health related quality of life (HRQoL), health literacy, and general self efficacy compared with standard care for patients undergoing revascularisation for intermittent claudication (IC), and to describe factors associated with HRQoL one year after revascularisation.

METHODS: This was a secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial. Patients with IC scheduled for revascularisation at two vascular surgery centres in Sweden between 2016 and 2018 were randomised to intervention or control. During the first year after surgery, the intervention group received a person centred follow up programme with three visits and two telephone calls with a vascular nurse, while the control group received standard follow up with two visits to a vascular surgeon or vascular nurse. Outcomes were HRQoL measured by VascuQol-6, health literacy, and general self efficacy measured by validated questionnaires.

RESULTS: Overall, 214 patients were included in the trial; this secondary analysis comprised 183 patients who completed the questionnaires. One year after revascularisation, HRQoL had improved with a mean increase in VascuQol-6 of 7.0 scale steps (95% CI 5.9 - 8.0) for the intervention and 6.0 scale steps (95% CI 4.9 - 7.0) for the control group; the difference between the groups was not significant (p = .18). In an adjusted regression analysis, the intervention was associated with higher VascuQoL-6 (2.0 scale steps, 95% CI 0.08 - 3.93). There was no significant difference between the groups regarding health literacy or general self efficacy. The prevalence of insufficient health literacy among all participants was 38.7% (46/119) at baseline and 43.2% (51/118) at one year.

CONCLUSION: In this study, a person centred, nurse led follow up programme had no significant impact on HRQoL, health literacy, or general self efficacy among patients undergoing revascularisation for IC. The prevalence of insufficient health literacy was high and should be addressed by healthcare givers and researchers.

Keywords
Health literacy, Health related quality of life, Intermittent claudication, Person centred care, Self efficacy
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-4983 (URN)10.1016/j.ejvs.2023.06.030 (DOI)37391012 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-08-11 Created: 2023-08-11 Last updated: 2024-01-03Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3309-136x

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