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Willman, A., Bjuresäter, K. & Nilsson, J. (2021). Insufficiently supported in handling responsibility and demands: Findings from a qualitative study of newly graduated nurses. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 30(1-2), 83-92
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Insufficiently supported in handling responsibility and demands: Findings from a qualitative study of newly graduated nurses
2021 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 30, no 1-2, p. 83-92Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: To explore newly graduated registered nurses' experiences and how they manage complex patient situations.

BACKGROUND: Newly graduated registered nurses' working in acute care hospital settings are challenged by managing complex patient situations in rapidly changing clinical contexts involving increased patient acuity, co-morbidities, and staffing shortages.

DESIGN: Qualitative study design.

METHODS: Data were collected using focus groups interviews of a total of 16 newly graduated registered nurses with clinical work experience of six months of direct patient care in an acute care hospital setting. Analyses were conducted using qualitative content analysis. COREQ reporting guidelines were used.

RESULTS: The analysis resulted in the overarching theme `Not being sufficiently prepared and supported to meet responsibilities and demands´. The theme included three categories: `Responsibility is not in proportion to competence´, ` Lack of medical competence and experience complicates patient safety´, and `Strives for control to manage and organize nursing care´.

CONCLUSION: The results show that newly graduated registered nurses' are not sufficiently supported for the level of responsibility and the demands placed on them when providing nursing in complex patient situations in acute care hospital settings. If they are given sole responsibility for multiple complex patient situations, patient safety may be compromised.

Keywords
Acute Care, Competencies, New Graduate Nurse, Nursing Care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-3801 (URN)10.1111/jocn.15483 (DOI)32889729 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-09-21 Created: 2020-09-21 Last updated: 2021-10-08Bibliographically approved
Halabi, J. O., Nilsson, J. & Lepp, M. (2021). Professional competence among registered nurses working in hospitals in Saudi Arabia and their experiences of quality of nursing care and patient safety. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 32(4), 425-433, Article ID 1043659621992845.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Professional competence among registered nurses working in hospitals in Saudi Arabia and their experiences of quality of nursing care and patient safety
2021 (English)In: Journal of Transcultural Nursing, ISSN 1043-6596, E-ISSN 1552-7832, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 425-433, article id 1043659621992845Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) plans to become self-sufficient, generating a national nursing workforce. The study's purpose was to assess nurses' self-reported professional competence and illuminate experiences of the quality of nursing care and patient safety.

METHODOLOGY: A cross-sectional design with 469 nurses working in different units from two public hospitals and Regions of the KSA participated. The Nurse Professional Competence Scale short version including six professional areas of nursing care was used.

RESULTS: There are significant relationships between self-reported professional competence and the quality of nursing care, patient safety, nurse's characteristics, and workplace.

DISCUSSION: Registered nurses' professional competence is related to the clinical areas in which they work and the nature of their involvement in patient care. The Nurse Professional Competence Scale can identify professional competence areas for further development, which is important for culturally congruent health care in KSA for their transformation process.

Keywords
NPC Scale, Saudi Arabia, Nursing, Patient safety, Professional competence, Quality of care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-3971 (URN)10.1177/1043659621992845 (DOI)33576306 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-02-22 Created: 2021-02-22 Last updated: 2022-01-07Bibliographically approved
Xu, L., Nilsson, J., Zhang, J. & Engström, M. (2021). Psychometric evaluation of Nurse Professional Competence Scale: Short-form Chinese language version among nursing graduate students. Nursing Open, 8(6), 3232-3241
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychometric evaluation of Nurse Professional Competence Scale: Short-form Chinese language version among nursing graduate students
2021 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 3232-3241Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: The aim of the study was to determine the psychometric properties, construct validity and internal consistency of the Chinese language version of the Nurse Professional Competence scale short form.

DESIGN: A methodological design was used.

METHODS: Questionnaire data from 260 nursing students nearing graduation from 2 universities in China were analysed using confirmatory factor analysis, known-group validity and internal consistency.

RESULTS: The confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the model was acceptable, and the analyses for known-group validity revealed statistically significant differences in all factors and the total scale of the Nurse Professional Competence scale short form. Internal consistency revealed that Cronbach's alpha values exceeded 0.70 for all factors and the total scale. The Chinese language version of the Nurse Professional Competence scale short form has acceptable construct validity and good internal consistency.

Keywords
Nurse professional competence, Nursing students, Psychometric testing, Reliability, Short form, Validity
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-4211 (URN)10.1002/nop2.1036 (DOI)34469073 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-10-19 Created: 2021-10-19 Last updated: 2021-10-19Bibliographically approved
Halabi, J. O., Lepp, M. & Nilsson, J. (2020). Assessing self-reported competence among registered nurses working as a culturally diverse work force in public hospitals in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, Article ID 1043659620921222.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing self-reported competence among registered nurses working as a culturally diverse work force in public hospitals in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
2020 (English)In: Journal of Transcultural Nursing, ISSN 1043-6596, E-ISSN 1552-7832, article id 1043659620921222Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Nurses in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) represent a multicultural workforce who are educated in different countries from around the world. The purpose was to assess professional competence among a multicultural workforce of registered nurses in KSA in relation to individual and work-related factors.

Method: The Nurse Professional Competence Scale was used in a cross-sectional design.

Results: Registered nurses (N = 541) reported highest scores for "nursing care," and "value-based nursing care," and lowest scores for "care pedagogics," and "development, leadership, and organization of nursing care." All CAs achieved 0.80 or more Cronbach's alpha. Known-group validity was verified by comparing nurse managers and staff nurses competence in organization, administration, and leadership of nursing care (p = .000).

Discussion: There is room for competence development in care pedagogics, and development, leadership, and organization of nursing care. Assessing registered nurses competence is of importance for planning and implementing cultural congruent nursing care.

Keywords
NPC Scale, Saudi Arabia, clinical competence, health workforce, internationality, nurses, professional competence, validation studies
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-3743 (URN)10.1177/1043659620921222 (DOI)32418474 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-06-08 Created: 2020-06-08 Last updated: 2020-06-08Bibliographically approved
Forsman, H., Jansson, I., Leksell, J., Lepp, M., Sundin Andersson, C., Engström, M. & Nilsson, J. (2020). Clusters of competence: Relationship between self-reported professional competence and achievement on a national examination among graduating nursing students. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 76(1), 199-208
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clusters of competence: Relationship between self-reported professional competence and achievement on a national examination among graduating nursing students
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 76, no 1, p. 199-208Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS: To identify clusters based on graduating nursing students' self-reported professional competence and their achievement on a national examination. Furthermore, to describe and compare the identified clusters regarding sample characteristics, students' perceptions of overall quality of the nursing programme and students' general self-efficacy.

DESIGN: A cross-sectional study combining survey data and results from a national examination.

METHODS: Data were collected at two universities and one university college in Sweden in January 2017, including 179 students in the final term of the nursing programme. The study was based on the Nurse Professional Competence Scale, the General Self-Efficacy scale and results from the National Clinical Final Examination. A Two-Step Cluster Analysis was used to identify competence profiles, followed by comparative analyses between clusters.

RESULTS: Three clusters were identified illustrating students' different competence profiles. Students in Cluster 1 and 2 passed the examination, but differed in their self-assessments of competence, rating themselves under and above the overall median value respectively. Students in Cluster 3 failed the examination but rated themselves at the overall median level or higher.

CONCLUSION: The study illustrates how nursing students' self-assessed competence might differ from competency assessed by examination, which is challenging for nursing education. Self-evaluation is a key learning outcome and is, in the long run, essential to patient safety.

IMPACT: The study has identified clusters of students where some overestimate and others underestimate their competence. Students who assessed their competence low but passed the exam assessed their general self-efficacy lower than other students. The findings illuminate the need for student-centered strategies in nursing education, including elements of self-assessment in relation to examination to make the students more aware of their clinical competence.

Keywords
cluster analysis, nursing education, nursing students, professional competence, questionnaires, self-assessment, survey
National Category
Nursing Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-3485 (URN)10.1111/jan.14222 (DOI)31576579 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-25 Created: 2019-10-25 Last updated: 2020-06-02Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, J., Johansson, S., Nordström, G. & Wilde-Larsson, B. (2020). Development and validation of the Ambulance Nurse Competence scale. Journal of Emergency Nursing, 46(1), 34-43, Article ID S0099-1767(19)30460-X.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development and validation of the Ambulance Nurse Competence scale
2020 (English)In: Journal of Emergency Nursing, ISSN 0099-1767, E-ISSN 1527-2966, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 34-43, article id S0099-1767(19)30460-XArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: In recent decades, major competency shifts have taken place in prehospital care in Sweden because staffing ambulances with registered/specialized nurses has become a priority. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a new instrument to measure the self-reported professional competency of specialist ambulance nursing students and registered/specialist nurses working in prehospital care.

METHODS: This study used a quantitative cross-sectional design to evaluate psychometric properties of a new instrument. The sample included 179 registered/specialist ambulance nurses and 34 specialist ambulance nursing students.

RESULTS: The analyses resulted in the Ambulance Nurse Competence (ANC) scale, consisting of 43 items and covering 8 factors: Nursing Care (n = 8), Value-based Nursing Care (n = 5), Medical Technical Care (n = 5), Care Environment's Community (n = 4), Care Environment's Serious Events (n = 8), Leadership Management (n = 3), Supervision and Professional Conduct (n = 4), and Research and Development (n = 6). All factors except Leadership Management achieved a Cronbach's alpha value greater than 0.71, explaining 59.62% of the total variance.

DISCUSSION: The ANC scale was systematically tested and showed satisfactory psychometrical properties. The ANC scale can be used in the education programs of future registered/specialist ambulance nurses as a tool for self-reflected learning and could also be of potential use in identifying competence gaps in registered/specialist ambulance nurses, which could direct the design of introductory programs. The scale could also be used as an outcome measure together with other instruments.

Keywords
Ambulance nurse, Competencies, Prehospital, Psychometric properties, Scale development, Specialist nurse
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-3554 (URN)10.1016/j.jen.2019.07.019 (DOI)31685336 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-13 Created: 2020-01-13 Last updated: 2020-06-02Bibliographically approved
Lachmann, H. & Nilsson, J. (2020). Dual use of instruments for assessing nursing students professional - and clinical competence. Nurse Education Today, 96, Article ID 104616.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dual use of instruments for assessing nursing students professional - and clinical competence
2020 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 96, article id 104616Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Changes in demographics and the development of health systems have a direct impact on patients' nursing needs and nurses' ability to meet them. Modern and forward-looking nursing education programmes that will help nursing students to develop their professional competence require useful tools for assessment and self-reflection that can be combined in theoretical and clinical education.

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the associations between the Nurse Professional Competence Scale - Short Form (NPC-SF), and the tool Assessment of Clinical Education (AssCE) tool, and to assess the graduating students´ professional competence based on their self-assessment.

DESIGN: A cross-sectional descriptive study design was used.

PARTICIPANTS AND SETTINGS: A total of 151 nursing students at a Swedish university college completed the NPC-SF and the AssCE (response rate 77%).

METHODS: In their final weeks of the nursing programme, students were invited to respond to two questionnaires: the NPC Scale - Short Form (35 items) and the AssCE tool (21 items).

RESULT: There are significant correlations between the nursing students' responses to the NPC-SF competence areas and the AssCE areas (r = 0.19-0.57). Students score in the NPC-SF were highest in Value-based Nursing Care and lowest in Development, Leadership and Organization of Nursing Care, and in the AssCE areas student scores were highest in Examination and treatment and Professional Approach and lowest in Management and Cooperation.

CONCLUSION: The NPC-SF and AssCE are valid and reliable instruments, showing a high level of correlation. Results imply that dual use could strengthen student-centred theoretical and clinical learning as well as professional competence development. Additional research is needed to assess student's competence development during the nursing program.

Keywords
AssCE, Competence, NPC Scale – Short form, Newly graduated nurses
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-3870 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2020.104616 (DOI)33130447 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-11-18 Created: 2020-11-18 Last updated: 2020-11-18Bibliographically approved
Willman, A., Bjuresäter, K. & Nilsson, J. (2020). Newly graduated nurses' clinical competencies and need for further training in acute care hospitals. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 29, 2209-2220
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Newly graduated nurses' clinical competencies and need for further training in acute care hospitals
2020 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 29, p. 2209-2220Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: To assess self-reported clinical competence and the need for further training among newly graduated registered nurses (NGRNs) working in Swedish acute care hospital settings.

BACKGROUND: NGRNs are expected to take full responsibility for patients' nursing care in an increasingly complex clinical context and professional nurses' clinical competence is critical in providing high quality and safe nursing care.

DESIGN: A cross-sectional design.

METHODS: Data were collected using the 50-item ProffNurse SAS II. A total of 85 NGRNs who had recently commenced working with direct patient care at three hospitals in central Sweden participated in the study. The response rate was 69%. The STROBE cross-sectional reporting guidelines was used.

RESULTS: The NGRNs assessed their clinical competence as being highest in areas relating to team collaboration and ethics and lowest in areas relating to professional development and direct clinical practice. The need for further training was greatest in areas such as direct clinical practice and patient safety and lowest in areas such as team collaborating and ethics.

CONCLUSION: The use of instruments to identify NGRNs' self-assessed clinical competence is of value when designing and evaluating introductory programs for NGRNs taking on positions in acute care hospital settings. The availability of experienced nurses from whom NGRNs can gain clinical competence and learn from is of importance, both from the perspective of the NGRNs themselves as well as patient safety.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: An understanding of NGRNs' clinical competence and their need for further training may assist in both planning and organizing nursing programs and in making clinical policy decisions when designing introduction programs in acute care settings.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-3596 (URN)10.1111/jocn.15207 (DOI)32043711 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-02-18 Created: 2020-02-18 Last updated: 2021-10-08Bibliographically approved
Willman, A., Bjuresäter, K. & Nilsson, J. (2020). Newly graduated registered nurses' self-assessed clinical competence and their need for further training. Nursing Open, 7(3), 720-730
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Newly graduated registered nurses' self-assessed clinical competence and their need for further training
2020 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 720-730Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Acute care settings, Clinical competence, Competence development, Complex patient situations, Newly registered graduated nurses, Nurse competence
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-3589 (URN)
Available from: 2020-02-14 Created: 2020-02-14 Last updated: 2020-06-02Bibliographically approved
Jansson, J., Josse Eklund, A., Larsson, M. & Nilsson, J. (2020). Prehospital care nurses' self reported competence: A cross-sectional study. International Emergency Nursing, 52, Article ID 100896.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prehospital care nurses' self reported competence: A cross-sectional study
2020 (English)In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 52, article id 100896Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The Swedish ambulance service has undergone major changes in recent decades due to advancements being made in medical and technical resources, professional competence, and patient care. Registered and specialist nurses share the same role, accountabilities, and responsibilities in the ambulance service, and their professional competence has not yet been evaluated.

OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to investigate and compare self-reported professional competence among nurses working in the ambulance service and to explore associations between potentially predictive background factors and self-reported professional competence.

METHOD: A cross-sectional study with a digital questionnaire was used for collecting data from 34 registered nurses and 71 specialist nurses. The Ambulance Nurse Competence Scale and the Research Utilization Questionnaire were used for data collection.

RESULTS: Significant differences were found among the nursing categories in terms of age, gender, education, and work experience. Prehospital emergency nurses reported the highest professional competence. Nurses with a master's degree did not report significantly higher professional competence than nurses with a bachelor's degree.

CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicated that there are differences in the professional competence of registered nurses and specialist nurses. Length of work experience in the ambulance service is an important factor associated with higher professional competence.

Keywords
ANC scale, Ambulance service, Nurses, Professional competence, Research utilization
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-3791 (URN)10.1016/j.ienj.2020.100896 (DOI)32763799 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-09-09 Created: 2020-09-09 Last updated: 2021-01-07Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6245-1788

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