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Mazaheri, Monir, Associate Professor, Senior lecturerORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3589-318X
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 12) Show all publications
Karami, F., Nikbakht Nasrabadi, A., Torabizadeh, C., Mazaheri, M. & Sayadi, L. (2024). The challenges of voluntary care provision for hospitalized patients with COVID-19: A qualitative study of the public volunteers' experiences. Health Expectations, 27(2), Article ID e13998.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The challenges of voluntary care provision for hospitalized patients with COVID-19: A qualitative study of the public volunteers' experiences
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2024 (English)In: Health Expectations, ISSN 1369-6513, E-ISSN 1369-7625, Vol. 27, no 2, article id e13998Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a remarkable increase in public volunteering for the care of hospitalized patients. They faced challenges during their voluntary care provision. This study aimed at exploring public volunteers' experiences of the challenges of the voluntary care provision to hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

METHODS: A descriptive qualitative study with an inductive content analysis method was conducted, 2022-2023. Eighteen public volunteers providing care to hospitalized patients with COVID-19 were purposefully selected among 10 hospitals, specialized in COVID-19 care in Tehran and Shiraz, Iran. Data were collected over 7 months through in-depth semistructured interviews and concurrently analyzed using conventional content analysis methods.

FINDINGS: The challenges of voluntary care provision to hospitalized patients with COVID-19 were illustrated in five main categories, each with two subcategories. The categories included structural challenges, interpersonal conflicts, financial constraints, covert participation and the deteriorating condition of care provision. The subcategories comprised lack of volunteer recruitment bases, ineffective organization of voluntary activities, pervasive distrust, heightened risk of clinical errors, conflicts between volunteer commitments and primary occupation, lack of financial support, lack of family support, isolation by friends, mental trauma and physical exhaustion.

CONCLUSION: Public volunteers encounter diverse challenges while providing care to hospitalized patients with COVID-19, which negatively impacts their motivation to serve. By addressing these challenges, we can create a more supportive environment for volunteers and enhance the quality of care provided to patients during public health emergencies. Identifying such challenges can assist healthcare managers and policymakers develop effective strategies to mitigate mounting difficulties and enhance volunteer services, thereby improving the overall quality of care provided to patients during public health crises.

PATIENT CONTRIBUTIONS: Participants were identified and recruited after the study objectives were explained in person to the managers. The participants were approached and interviewed by one author. Participation was voluntary and the participants did not receive any financial compensation for their time.

Keywords
COVID-19, Challenges, Content analysis, Public volunteers, Qualitative research
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-5173 (URN)10.1111/hex.13998 (DOI)38403902 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2024-03-12 Created: 2024-03-12 Last updated: 2024-03-12Bibliographically approved
Mazaheri, M. & Eriksson, H. (2023). An intersectional analysis of health inequalities and vulnerabilities during the Covid-19 pandemic. In: K. Ogunyemi & A.I. Onaga (Ed.), Responsible management of shifts in work modes: Values for post pandemic sustainability, volume 2 (pp. 109-118). Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An intersectional analysis of health inequalities and vulnerabilities during the Covid-19 pandemic
2023 (English)In: Responsible management of shifts in work modes: Values for post pandemic sustainability, volume 2 / [ed] K. Ogunyemi & A.I. Onaga, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2023, p. 109-118Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2023
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-4712 (URN)978-1-80262-724-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-01-18 Created: 2023-01-18 Last updated: 2024-02-21Bibliographically approved
Grbovic, F., Åling, M., Strömberg, L. & Mazaheri, M. (2023). Assessing the alignment of Short-Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability (START) with NANDA-I taxonomy in forensic care settings. Perspectives in psychiatric care, Article ID 8073893.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing the alignment of Short-Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability (START) with NANDA-I taxonomy in forensic care settings
2023 (English)In: Perspectives in psychiatric care, ISSN 0031-5990, E-ISSN 1744-6163, article id 8073893Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-5086 (URN)10.1155/2023/8073893 (DOI)
Available from: 2023-12-13 Created: 2023-12-13 Last updated: 2023-12-13Bibliographically approved
Åhs, J. W., Ranheim, A., Mattelin, E., Eriksson, H. & Mazaheri, M. (2023). Distance in distant care: Qualitative content analysis of providers' experiences in tele-mental care. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 25, Article ID e38568.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distance in distant care: Qualitative content analysis of providers' experiences in tele-mental care
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 25, article id e38568Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Care delivery, Communication technology, Content analysis, Experience, Health care professional, Mental health, Patient care, Patient-provider, Provider, Provider experience, Qualitative, Telehealth, Telemedicine
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-4765 (URN)10.2196/38568 (DOI)36800225 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-03-22 Created: 2023-03-22 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Åhs, J. W., Eriksson, H. & Mazaheri, M. (2023). Distant suffering: A concept analysis. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 151, Article ID 104672.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distant suffering: A concept analysis
2023 (English)In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 151, article id 104672Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Patients who are suffering may be commonly encountered in health care. The growing use of telehealth implies that encounters with patients who are suffering may increasingly take place at a distance. "Distant suffering" is a concept coined within sociology to describe the suffering of far-away others. It is conceptualized as a paradox, as distance changes the relation between the witness of suffering and the suffering encountered. Impacts may include a potential detriment to the sufferer and ethical implications for the witness.

OBJECTIVE: To explore the concept of distant suffering and any relevance, implications, or important avenues for potential research within the healthcare sciences.

DESIGN: Rodgers' evolutionary concept analysis.

DATA SOURCES: Databases of Web of Science, Medline, CINAHL and PsycInfo were searched for the terms "distant suffering" or "mediated suffering".

REVIEW METHOD: Attributes, surrogate or related terms, antecedents, consequences, and uses of the concept were extracted and synthesized.

RESULTS: Thirty articles published within the past ten years were selected for review from the search results. "Distant suffering" was characterized as comprising 1) mediated far-away suffering, 2) a "recognizer" or witness, and 3) a potential role of a moderator. Antecedents include shared understandings and socially-influenced responses. Consequences include responses like empathy, compassion, pity, also indifference, cynicism and compassion fatigue.

CONCLUSIONS: Further research to explore distant suffering from healthcare sciences' perspective could uncover valuable insights for those suffering, for healthcare workers, and any who are exposed to it. An improved understanding of how distant suffering is conveyed and moderated could enable targeted reduction of exposure or improve response to distant suffering. Such knowledge could help diminish negative consequences for those suffering, for healthcare workers who are caring at a distance for those suffering, or for others who encounter distant suffering in their occupations or in daily life via media, social media, or digital communications.

TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: New analysis finds that exposure to distant suffering may have important implications for health and health care.

Keywords
Distress, Health care, Mediation, Suffering, Witnessing
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-5106 (URN)10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2023.104672 (DOI)38184919 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2024-01-08 Created: 2024-01-08 Last updated: 2024-01-08Bibliographically approved
Åhs, J. W., Ranheim, A., Eriksson, H. & Mazaheri, M. (2023). Encountering suffering in digital care: A qualitative study of providers' experiences in telemental health care. BMC Health Services Research, 23, Article ID 418.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Encountering suffering in digital care: A qualitative study of providers' experiences in telemental health care
2023 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 23, article id 418Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Encountering patients who are suffering is common in health care, and particularly when providing mental health care. Telehealth technologies are increasingly used to provide mental health care, yet little is known about the experiences of providers when encountering patients who are suffering within remote care. The present study explored health care providers' lived experiences of encountering patient suffering during telemental health care.

METHODS: A qualitative phenomenological approach was used to uncover participants' experiences. In-depth interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of physicians, psychologists, and therapists who used telemental health in varied clinical practices in Sweden. Data were analyzed using descriptive phenomenology.

RESULTS: Telehealth care with patients who were suffering was experienced by providers as loose connections, both literally in compromised functioning of the technology and figuratively in a compromised ability connecting emotionally with patients. Providers' lived experiences were explicated into the following aspects: insecurity in digital practice, inaccessibility of the armamentarium, and conviction in the value of telehealth care. Interpersonal connection between patient and provider is necessary. Worry and guilt arose for providers with fears that technology would not work, patient status was deteriorated, or the care needed could not be delivered. Providers overcame barriers in telehealth encounters, and expressed they perceived that patients appreciated the care received, and through it found relief.

CONCLUSIONS: This study brings an understanding of experiences in providing telemental care for patients who are suffering. Providers experience challenges in connecting with patients, and in accessing tools needed to enable reaching the goals of the caring encounter. Efforts to ensure functioning of technology, comfort with its use, and accessibility of tools might be some accommodations to support providers for successful and rewarding telehealth care encounters.

Keywords
Lived experience, Mental health providers, Patient care, Phenomenology, Suffering, Telehealth
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-4915 (URN)10.1186/s12913-023-09367-x (DOI)37127655 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-05-25 Created: 2023-05-25 Last updated: 2024-01-09Bibliographically approved
Nazari, S., Norberg, A., Strandberg, G., Åhlin, J., Ericson-Lidman, E. & Mazaheri, M. (2023). Perceptions and stress of conscience in relation to burnout among nursing staff in older people care settings: A cross sectional study. BMC Nursing, 22, Article ID 379.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions and stress of conscience in relation to burnout among nursing staff in older people care settings: A cross sectional study
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2023 (English)In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 22, article id 379Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Considering cultural influences, it is important to study the perceptions and stress of conscience in different contexts. This study aimed to investigate the association between perceptions of conscience, stress of conscience, and burnout among nursing staff working in older people care settings in Tehran.

METHODS: This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study. A total of 161 participants completed the Perceptions of Conscience Questionnaire, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, and Oldenburg Burnout Inventory, 2019. All nursing staff working at the 20 contacted nursing homes agreed to participate in the study. The descriptive and inferential analysis was conducted through SPSS, using T-tests and one-way between-groups analysis of variance, Chi-square and t-tests, Cohen's d (d), Eta-squared (η2), and Phi coefficient (φ), Partial least squares regression (PLSR), jackknife approximate t-tests of the regression coefficients, and jackknife 95% confidence intervals of the regression coefficients.

RESULTS: The nursing staff perceived their conscience mainly as an authority, asset, and warning signal. Impact of workload on family life was the most common source of stress for the nursing staff. Dealing with incompatible demands, the impact of workload on family life, witnessing insulated patients, inability to meet one's standards in providing care, and perception of conscience as a burden were strongly associated with the burnout.

CONCLUSIONS: Perceiving conscience as a warning signal or authority may serve as a buffer against burnout among nursing staff. This study highlights the need for further exploration of perceptions of conscience in different cultural and social backgrounds.

Keywords
Burnout, Nursing staff, Older people care, Perceptions of conscience, Stress of conscience
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-5042 (URN)10.1186/s12912-023-01529-w (DOI)37833719 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-10-17 Created: 2023-10-17 Last updated: 2024-01-09Bibliographically approved
Atthayasai, J., Chatchumni, M., Eriksson, H. & Mazaheri, M. (2023). Surgical nurses' perceptions of strategies to enhance pain management proficiency: A qualitative study. Nursing Reports, 13(2), 923-933
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Surgical nurses' perceptions of strategies to enhance pain management proficiency: A qualitative study
2023 (English)In: Nursing Reports, ISSN 2039-439X, E-ISSN 2039-4403, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 923-933Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To describe surgical nurses' strategies for enhancing their pain management proficiency. A qualitative design was used to conduct the study. The participants were forty surgical nurses who had at least six years of nursing experience in caring for patients with pain. They responded to open-ended questions based on a review of the policy documents concerning the main elements of the pain management programme to be implemented by surgical nurses. Three key themes emerged from the surgical nurses' suggested strategies: partnering, disrupting, and becoming familiar with pain management competency concerns. Surgical nurses' strategies in acute and chronic pain management nursing units included solving patients' problems and promoting and enhancing pain strategies to address health challenges in organisations. The themes presented in the results include enhancing pain management in nursing competencies. State-of-the-art healthcare technologies are being applied to pain management. Surgical nurses' strategies should improve the quality of nursing care, especially post-surgery recovery time. It is recommended to engage patients, their families, and multidisciplinary care teams in other healthcare fields.

Keywords
Competence, Knowledge, Pain management proficiency, Postoperative pain, Surgical nurses’ strategies
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-4985 (URN)10.3390/nursrep13020081 (DOI)37368348 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-08-15 Created: 2023-08-15 Last updated: 2023-08-15Bibliographically approved
Mazaheri, M. (2022). Adopting new perspectives in face of health inequalities during the COVID-19 pandemic. In: : . Paper presented at The 7th RSU International Research Conference on Science and Technology, Rangsit University, Thailand, 29 april 2022 (digital konferens).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adopting new perspectives in face of health inequalities during the COVID-19 pandemic
2022 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-4711 (URN)
Conference
The 7th RSU International Research Conference on Science and Technology, Rangsit University, Thailand, 29 april 2022 (digital konferens)
Available from: 2023-01-18 Created: 2023-01-18 Last updated: 2023-01-18Bibliographically approved
Esmaeili, M., Adib, M., Zakeri Moghadam, M., Dehghan Nayeri, N. & Mazaheri, M. (2022). Broken toughness: Iranian older adults' perceptions of abuse. Annals of Geriatric Medicine and Research, 26(3), 248-255
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Broken toughness: Iranian older adults' perceptions of abuse
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2022 (English)In: Annals of Geriatric Medicine and Research, ISSN 2508-4909, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 248-255Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Older people abuse includes intentional or unintentional conduct or omission of a specific behavior by a trusted person that causes injury or distress to older people. This study described older peoples' perceptions of abuse in Iranian society.

Methods: This qualitative study applied a conventional content analysis method to understand the perceptions of abuse among older Iranian people. Twenty older residents were selected by purposeful sampling. Data were collected through in-depth, semi-structured, and face-to-face interviews. The six-step Graneheim and Lundman content analysis method guided data analysis. MAXQDA software version 10 was used to manage the data.

Results: The data analysis led to the identification of three main themes: broken toughness, hidden abuse, and exploitation. The first theme had two sub-themes: domination and disturbed peace and tranquility.

Conclusion: Abuse resulted from a combination of causes and factors. Abuse was hidden in many cases and was not limited to physical abuse. The other examples of abuse included disrespect, deprivation of authority, disturbed tranquility, and financial exploitation of older adults.

Keywords
Abuse, Older people, Perception, Qualitative study
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:shh:diva-4585 (URN)10.4235/agmr.22.0039 (DOI)35915955 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-09-27 Created: 2022-09-27 Last updated: 2023-01-03Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3589-318X

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